Publications by authors named "Sabrina Moretti"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Management of Infants with Brief Resolved Unexplained Events (BRUE) and Apparent Life-Threatening Events (ALTE): A RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Approach.

Life (Basel) 2021 Feb 22;11(2). Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Pediatric Clinic, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy.

Unexpected events of breath, tone, and skin color change in infants are a cause of considerable distress to the caregiver and there is still debate on their appropriate management. The aim of this study is to survey the trend in prevention, decision-making, and management of brief resolved unexplained events (BRUE)/apparent life-threatening events (ALTE) and to develop a shared protocol among hospitals and primary care pediatricians regarding hospital admission criteria, work-up and post-discharge monitoring of patients with BRUE/ALTE. For the study purpose, a panel of 54 experts was selected to achieve consensus using the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method. Twelve scenarios were developed: one addressed to primary prevention of ALTE and BRUE, and 11 focused on hospital management of BRUE and ALTE. For each scenario, participants were asked to rank each option from '1' (extremely inappropriate) to '9' (extremely appropriate). Results derived from panel meeting and discussion showed several points of agreement but also disagreement with different opinion emerged and the need of focused education on some areas. However, by combining previous recommendations with expert opinion, the application of the RAND/UCLA appropriateness permitted us to drive pediatricians to reasoned and informed decisions in term of evaluation, treatment and follow-up of infants with BRUE/ALTE, reducing inappropriate exams and hospitalisation and highlighting priorities for educational interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/life11020171DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7926945PMC
February 2021

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Beyond Risk Factors.

Life (Basel) 2021 Feb 26;11(3). Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Department of Medicine and Surgery, University Hospital of Parma, 43126 Parma, Italy.

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is defined as "the sudden death of an infant under 1 year of age which remains unexplained after thorough investigation including a complete autopsy, death scene investigation, and detailed clinical and pathological review". A significant decrease of SIDS deaths occurred in the last decades in most countries after the beginning of national campaigns, mainly as a consequence of the implementation of risk reduction action mostly concentrating on the improvement of sleep conditions. Nevertheless, infant mortality from SIDS still remains unacceptably high. There is an urgent need to get insight into previously unexplored aspects of the brain system with a special focus on high-risk groups. SIDS pathogenesis is associated with a multifactorial condition that comprehends genetic, environmental and sociocultural factors. Effective prevention of SIDS requires multiple interventions from different fields. Developing brain susceptibility, intrinsic vulnerability and early identification of infants with high risk of SIDS represents a challenge. Progress in SIDS research appears to be fundamental to the ultimate aim of eradicating SIDS deaths. A complex model that combines different risk factor data from biomarkers and omic analysis may represent a tool to identify a SIDS risk profile in newborn settings. If high risk is detected, the infant may be referred for further investigations and follow ups. This review aims to illustrate the most recent discoveries from different fields, analyzing the neuroanatomical, genetic, metabolic, proteomic, environmental and sociocultural aspects related to SIDS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/life11030184DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7996806PMC
February 2021

Neuroprem: the Neuro-developmental outcome of very low birth weight infants in an Italian region.

Ital J Pediatr 2020 Feb 22;46(1):26. Epub 2020 Feb 22.

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital of Modena, Via del Pozzo 71, 41100, Modena, Italy.

Introduction: The survival of preterm babies has increased worldwide, but the risk of neuro-developmental disabilities remains high, which is of concern to both the public and professionals. The early identification of children at risk of neuro-developmental disabilities may increase access to intervention, potentially influencing the outcome.

Aims: Neuroprem is an area-based prospective cohort study on the neuro-developmental outcome of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants that aims to define severe functional disability at 2 years of age.

Methods: Surviving VLBW infants from an Italian network of 7 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) were assessed for 24 months through the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS-R) or the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (BSDI III) and neuro-functional evaluation according to the International Classification of Disability and Health (ICF-CY). The primary outcome measure was severe functional disability at 2 years of age, defined as cerebral palsy, a BSDI III cognitive composite score < 2 standard deviation (SD) or a GMDS-R global quotients score < 2 SD, bilateral blindness or deafness.

Results: Among 211 surviving VLBW infants, 153 completed follow-up at 24 months (72.5%). Thirteen patients (8.5%) developed a severe functional disability, of whom 7 presented with cerebral palsy (overall rate of 4.5%). Patients with cerebral palsy were all classified with ICF-CY scores of 3 or 4. BSDI III composite scores and GMDS-R subscales were significantly correlated with ICF-CY scores (p < 0.01).

Conclusion: Neuroprem represents an Italian network of NICUs aiming to work together to ensure preterm neuro-developmental assessment. This study updates information on VLBW outcomes in an Italian region, showing a rate of cerebral palsy and major developmental disabilities in line with or even lower than those of similar international studies. Therefore, Neuroprem provides encouraging data on VLBW neurological outcomes and supports the implementation of a preterm follow-up programme from a national network perspective.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13052-020-0787-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7036238PMC
February 2020

Flow Cytometry Assessment of CD26 Leukemic Stem Cells in Peripheral Blood: A Simple and Rapid New Diagnostic Tool for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

Cytometry B Clin Cytom 2019 07 3;96(4):294-299. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Hematology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy.

Background: Recent investigations in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) have focused on the identification and characterization of leukemic stem cells (LSCs). These cells reside within the CD34 /CD38 /Lin fraction and score positive for CD26 (dipeptidylpeptidase IV) a marker, expressed in both bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) samples, that discriminates CML cells from normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) or from LSCs of other myeloid neoplasms. CD26 evaluation could be a useful tool to improve the identification of CML LCSs by using flow-cytometry assay.

Methods: CD26 LSCs have been isolated from EDTA PB and BM samples of patients with leucocytosis suspected for CML. Analysis of LSCs CML has been performed by using custom-made lyophilized pre-titrated antibody mixture test and control tube and a CD45 /CD34 /CD38 /CD26 panel as a strict flow cytometric gating strategy.

Results: The expression of CD26 on CD34 /CD38 population was detectable in 211/211 PB and 84/84 BM samples of subsequently confirmed BCR-ABL CP-CML patients. None of the 32 samples suspicious for CML but scoring negative for circulating CD26 LSCs were diagnosed as CML after conventional cytogenetic and molecular testing. To validate our results, we checked for PB CD26 LSCs in patients affected by other hematological disorders and they all scored negative for CD26 expression.

Conclusions: We propose flow cytometry evaluation of CD26 expression on PB CD34 /CD38 population as a new rapid, reproducible, and powerful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of CML. © 2019 The Authors. Cytometry Part B: Clinical Cytometry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Clinical Cytometry Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cyto.b.21764DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6767040PMC
July 2019

Identifying High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Pathogenesis-Oriented Appraisal of Prognostic and Predictive Factors in Patients Treated with Chemotherapy with or without Immunotherapy.

Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis 2016 15;8(1):e2016047. Epub 2016 Oct 15.

Section of Hematology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria S.Anna, Ferrara, Italy.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) displays an extremely variable clinical behaviour. Accurate prognostication and prediction of response to treatment are important in an era of effective first-line regimens and novel molecules for high risk patients. Because a plethora of prognostic biomarkers were identified, but few of them were validated by multivariable analysis in comprehensive prospective studies, we applied in this survey stringent criteria to select papers from the literature in order to identify the most reproducible prognostic/predictive markers. Each biomarker was analysed in terms of reproducibility across the different studies with respect to its impact on time to first treatment (TTFT), progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and response to treatment. We were able to identify the following biomarkers as the most reliable in guiding risk stratification in the daily clinical practice: 17p-/ mutations, unmutated configuration, short telomeres and 11q-. However, the method for measuring telomere length was not validated yet and 11q- was predictive of inferior OS only in those patients who did not receive FCR-like combinations. Stage and lymphocytosis were predictive of shorter TTFT and age, high serum thymidine kinase levels and poor performance status were predictive of shorter OS. Using our criteria no parameter was found to independently predict for inferior response to treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4084/MJHID.2016.047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5111525PMC
October 2016

Infections with multiple high-risk HPV types are associated with high-grade and persistent low-grade intraepithelial lesions of the cervix.

Cancer Cytopathol 2017 Feb 21;125(2):138-143. Epub 2016 Nov 21.

Department of Pathology, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Background: Infections with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) types (mHPV) in Papanicolaou tests have been reported but the histologic correlation and clinical meaning remains debatable.

Methods: The authors prospectively tested 37 HPV types using the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test and correlated the results to cytology and histology findings in 260 women evaluated from June 2009 to October 2011 and followed for up to 60 months.

Results: HPV was detected in 148 of 235 samples (63%) and high-risk HPV was detected in 132 samples (56%). mHPV infection was found to be twice as common as single HPV (sHPV) infection and was detected more frequently in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) (48 of 83 samples [58%]) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or invasive carcinoma (HSIL + (26 of 47 samples [55%]) compared with other categories (P<.001). Of 34 LSIL/cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1 (CIN1) index cases, 13 of 21 patients with mHPV (61.9%) persisted on CIN1, whereas no histologic abnormality was detected during follow-up in all 12 patients with sHPV infection (high risk or low risk) (P<.001). Eighteen of 20 patients with HSIL/cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 (CIN2) (90%) and high-risk mHPV persisted on HSIL+/CIN2 + whereas 6 of 11 patients with sHPV infection did not demonstrate HSIL+/CIN2 + on follow-up (54.5%) (P = .066). Approximately 40% of women with HSIL were infected by high-risk HPV types other than types 16 or 18.

Conclusions: High-risk mHPV infection identified patients with persistent LSIL/CIN1 and may to help identify patients at higher risk of disease progression to HSIL+/CIN2+. Longer follow-up will clarify the role of mHPV testing in patient care. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:138-143. © 2016 American Cancer Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncy.21789DOI Listing
February 2017

Sleep breathing disorders in 40 Italian patients with Myotonic dystrophy type 1.

Neuromuscul Disord 2012 Mar 3;22(3):219-24. Epub 2011 Dec 3.

Clinical Epileptology and Experimental Neurophysiology Unit, Neurological Institute Foundation Carlo Besta, Milan, Italy.

The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and nature of sleep breathing disorders in Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). We wanted to determine whether there is a relationship between sleep breathing disorders and clinical parameters such as pulmonary function, degree of neuromuscular impairment, daytime sleepiness, and fatigue. This will help assess the prevalence of DM1 patients requiring nocturnal ventilatory treatments. We studied a random sample of 40 unrelated patients and found that 22/40 patients had obstructive sleep apnoea. Of these 22 patients, five showed also periodic breathing and four showed sleep hypoventilation. Nine patients were put on nocturnal ventilation following clinical and instrumental evaluations. Our study reveals that obstructive sleep apnoea is very common in these patients, but cannot be predicted on the basis of clinical-neurological features and diurnal functional respiratory tests. Our data emphasize that a periodical evaluation by polysomnography should be mandatory to ascertain, and treat if necessary, the presence of obstructive sleep apnoea, periodic breathing or nocturnal hypoventilation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nmd.2011.08.010DOI Listing
March 2012

A decreased positivity for CD90 on human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is associated with a loss of immunosuppressive activity by MSCs.

Cytometry B Clin Cytom 2009 May;76(3):225-30

Hematology Section, University, St. Anna Hospital, Corso Giovecca n. 203, Ferrara, Italy.

Biologic and clinical interest in human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) has risen over the last years, mainly due to their immunosuppressive properties. In this study, we investigated the basis of immunomodulant possible variability using hMSC from different sources (amniotic membrane, chorion, and bone marrow from either healthy subjects or patients with hematological malignancies, HM) and having discordant positivity for several immunological markers. The CD90+ hMSC reduced lymphoproliferative response in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) via sHLA-G and IL-10 up-modulation. On the contrary, hMSC showing a significantly lower expression for CD90 antigen, elicited a lymphoproliferative allogeneic response in PHA/PBMCs without any increase in soluble HLA-G and IL-10 levels. These data seems to suggest that CD90 molecule may be considered a novel predictive marker for hMSC inhibitory ability, and might cooperate with HLA-G molecule in regulating suppressive versus stimulatory properties of hMSC. These results may have clinical implication in either transplantation or in regenerative medicine fields.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cyto.b.20461DOI Listing
May 2009

CXCR4 pos circulating progenitor cells coexpressing monocytic and endothelial markers correlating with fibrotic clinical features are present in the peripheral blood of patients affected by systemic sclerosis.

Haematologica 2008 Aug 12;93(8):1233-7. Epub 2008 Jun 12.

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Advanced Therapies, Hematology Section and BMT Unit, University of Ferrara-S.Anna Hospital, Ferrara, Italy.

There is still controversy regarding the role of circulating endothelial and progenitor cells (CECs/CEPs) in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Using a sequential Boolean gating strategy based on a 4-color flow cytometric protocol, an increased number of CD31(pos)/CD184(pos)(CXCR4)/CD34(pos)/CD45(pos) and CD31(pos)/CD117(pos) (c-kit-R) /CD34(pos)/ CD45(pos) hematopoietic circulating progenitor cells (HCPCs) was detected in SSc patients compared with healthy subjects. In SSc, no circulating mature and progenitor endothelial cells were observed, while an enhanced generation of erythroid progenitor cells was found to be correlated with the presence of CD117+ HCPCs. The presence of freshly detected CXCR4posHCPC was correlated either to the in vitro cultured spindle-shaped endothelial like cells (SELC) with an endo/myelomonocytic profile or to SDF-1 and VEGF serum level. These data are related to more fibrotic clinical features of the disease, thus supporting a possible role of these cells in fibrosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.12526DOI Listing
August 2008

Transient periventricular echodensities in preterms and neurodevelopmental outcome.

J Child Neurol 2006 Mar;21(3):230-5

Department of Pediatrics, Unit of Child Neuropsychiatry, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

Little is known about the clinical evolution and neurologic sequelae of transient periventricular echodensities in the neonatal period. The aim of our study was to assess the neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants with transient periventricular echodensities. Cerebral ultrasonography was performed within the first 72 hours of life on all preterms with a < or = 37 weeks' gestational age who were admitted consecutively to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the University of Parma from January 2001 to December 2002. Cerebral ultrasonography was performed at least twice within the 14th postnatal day and was repeated weekly until 40 weeks' postconceptional age. Transient aspecific echodensities were defined as areas in the periventricular region brighter than the choroid plexus persisting less than 14 days. One hundred sixty-four preterm infants were selected and divided into three groups: (1) 78 preterm infants without ultrasound abnormalities, (2) 50 preterm infants with transient periventricular echodensities, and (3) 36 preterm infants with persistent echodensities. Developmental outcome was assessed at 44 weeks' postconceptional age, after 1 month from the discharge and at the corrected ages of 3, 6, 9, and 12 months using the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scale. Group 1 and 2 infants showed normal neurodevelopment in 88.5% and 94% of cases, respectively, whereas the preterm infants belonging to group 3 had a favorable outcome in 22.2% (P < .001) of cases only. In conclusion, our study demonstrates how infants with transient echodensities show a neurodevelopmental outcome that is entirely identical to infants with a steadily negative ultrasound finding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2310/7010.2006.00059DOI Listing
March 2006

Immunophenotypic heterogeneity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with hematologic disorders: correlation with bone marrow microenvironment.

Haematologica 2006 Mar;91(3):364-8

Section of Hematology, University Hospital, Ferrara, Italy.

The immunophenotypic analysis of ex vivo-expanded mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has so far been confined to single or dual staining analysis in normal subjects. In this study, using a four-color cytofluorimetric protocol, we demonstrated that cultured MSC derived from the bone marrow of patients with hematologic malignancies showed alterations in the expression of CD105, CD90, CD184, and HLA-DR molecules. The decrease in the percentage of CD105+ and CD90+ MSC correlated with an increased bone marrow angiogenesis. This paper provides evidence that multiparametric flow cytometry is essential for the establishment of a standardized protocol to identify various MSCs subsets and aberrant phenotypes.
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March 2006

Alteration of the amniotic fluid and neonatal outcome.

Acta Biomed 2004 ;75 Suppl 1:71-5

Department of Gynaecology, Obstetrics and Neonatology, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

Quantitative and qualitative alterations of the amniotic fluid complicate 7% of the pregnancies. Polyhydramnios complicates 1-3% while oligohydramnios involves 3-5% of the pregnancies. The most common causes of polyhydramnios are fetal abnormalities, maternal diabetes and twin pregnancies, but are idiopathic in the 60%. Perinatal mortality has been reported to range between 10-30% while the risk of preterm birth reaches up to 22% in pregnancies complicated by polyhydramnios. The neonatal outcome, in cases where polyhydramnios is due to fetal-neonatal abnormalities, depends on the underlying pathology. Polyhydramnios due to defects in intestinal canalisation in particular, has been correlated to good neonatal prognosis. In our experience no early postoperative deaths occurred in a group of 16 newborns consequtively admitted to our unit in the last two years, with abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract with need of surgery within the second week of life. Most cases of oligohydramnios are due to premature rupture of membranes, other causes are fetal abnormalities, such as urinary tract malformations, or chromosomopaties and drugs e.g. NSAID's. Oligohydramnios of mild entities is often associated to preterm birth, fetal growth restriction. In some cases of oligohydramnios, neonatal survival is highly conditioned by pulmonary hypoplasia which develops with rates that range between 13 and 21%. Neonatal prognosis is often disastrous in cases with severe oligohydramnios, which however could be improved by amnioinfusion, which restores an amniotic fluid volume sufficient in reducing the adverse environmental effects and in prolonging, where possible, pregnancy. Beside the quantity also the quality of the amniotic fluid may be related to the neonatal outcome. Finding of some inflammatory factors (interleukines) in the amniotic fluid seems to be significantly correlated to periventricular leucomalacia (PVL), cerebral paralysis and long-term neurological abnormalities, both in the preterm and term neonate. Therefore, increase of the cytokines in the amniotic fluid could give information not only of the infection but also regarding the risk of developing neurological sequelae in neonatal period. Diagnosis and therapy for pathologies that alter the amniotic fluid have progressed, however efforts have still to be made in the identification and search for those quantitative-qualitative alterations of the amniotic fluid, for their potential implications on neonatal outcome.
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October 2004

"In vitro" evaluation of bone marrow angiogenesis in myelodysplastic syndromes: a morphological and functional approach.

Leuk Res 2004 Jan;28(1):9-17

Section of Hematology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Advanced Therapies, University of Ferrara, St. Anna Hospital, Corso Giovecca 203, 44100 Ferrara, Italy.

In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), ineffective hematopoiesis and cytopenia may arise either from increased susceptibility to apoptosis of hematopoietic cells, or possibly from alterations of bone marrow stroma that contributes to defective development of marrow lineages. In order to test the significance of the endothelial growth in MDS patients, two in vitro assays are presented in this study: a long-term culture method for the detection of human bone marrow endothelial colonies (CFU-En) (77 patients) and a human primary model for the evaluation of the influence of a "bone marrow conditioned medium" on the formation of new vessels in a culture matrix ("angio-kit assay") (in 24 out 77 patients). The in vitro growth pattern of bone marrow CFU-En as well as the generation of microvessels in the angio-kit system was increased in RA, RARS and RAEB in comparison with controls. No CFU-En were detected in RAEB-T. The occurrence of large islands, formed by clusters of endothelial cells, unable to generate microcapillaries was also reported. Chromosomal abnormalities did not correlate with the angiogenetic pattern. These in vitro assays may constitute an useful approach to the analysis of angiogenesis in MDS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0145-2126(03)00123-1DOI Listing
January 2004

CXCR-4 expression on bone marrow CD34+ cells prior to mobilization can predict mobilization adequacy in patients with hematologic malignancies.

J Hematother Stem Cell Res 2003 Aug;12(4):425-34

Section of Hematology, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Advanced Therapies, University of Ferrara, Italy.

To investigate the mechanisms of mobilization and of the factors implicated in the homing of progenitors and possibly understand the reasons for unpredicted mobilization failure, we analyzed CXCR-4 (CD184) expression on bone marrow (BM) CD34+ cells prior to peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization in 24 patients affected by hematologic malignancies (non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and acute myeloid leukemia). We wanted to determine whether the level of CXCR-4 expressed by hematopoietic stem cells could influence mobilization process and therefore could be considered a predictive factor for mobilization adequacy. These data were also compared with stromal cell function as assessed by colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) and CFU endothelial cells (CFU-En) assays and stromal layer confluence capacity exhibited by patients' BM cells. In this study, we also compared CXCR-4 expression on CD34+ cells from different sources and at different migration stages specifically bone marrow (BM), steady state peripheral blood (SSPB), fetal cord blood (FCB), cord blood (CB), and mobilized PBSC. Seven (29%) of the 24 patients undergoing mobilization failed to achieve an adequate number of CD34+ stem cells (5 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells) and showed a very high expression frequency of CXCR-4 on BM CD34(+) stem cells (mean number of positive cells, 97%) investigated before the mobilization regimen. We also found that high expression intensity per cell for CXCR-4 was associated with lower amounts of mobilized CD34+ cells whereas those patients (17 out of 24 patients, 71%) with lower expression intensity per cell of CD184 on BM CD34+ cells prior to mobilization harvested at least 5 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells. Setting a cut off of 5 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells harvested, patients mobilizing less had a mean value of 97% CD34+ cells expressing CXCR-4 with a relative mean channel fluorescence of 458 whereas patients mobilizing more than 5 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ progenitors showed a mean value of 59.8% CD34+/CXCR4+ cells with a relative mean channel fluorescence value of 305. Interestingly, in the poor mobilizers group, the marrow stromal microenvironment was found to be more severely damaged in comparison with that of good mobilizers. The comparative analysis of CXCR-4 expression showed no difference in percentage values between steady-state PB (87.4%) and BM (85.1%) stem cells whereas mobilized CD34+ stem cells have a lower expression frequency of CXCR-4 (71.6%) compared to that of progenitors from other sources. Fetal blood CD34+ stem cells had the lowest mean expression frequency of CD184 antigen (36.3%), while CB cells had the highest (94.8%). In conclusion, this study provides evidence that monitoring CXCR-4 CD34 double positive cells before mobilization can be regarded as a predictive factor for mobilization outcome, giving us directional cues for the choice of the best stem cell mobilization regimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/152581603322286051DOI Listing
August 2003

Expression of polycystin-1 C-terminal fragment enhances the ATP-induced Ca2+ release in human kidney cells.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2003 Feb;301(3):657-64

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, Italy.

Polycystin-1 (PC1) is a membrane protein expressed in tubular epithelia of developing kidneys and in other ductal structures. Recent studies indicate this protein to be putatively important in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) levels in various cell types, but little evidence exists for kidney epithelial cells. Here we examined the role of the PC1 cytoplasmic tail on the activity of store operated Ca(2+) channels in human kidney epithelial HEK-293 cell line. Cells were transiently transfected with chimeric proteins containing 1-226 or 26-226 aa of the PC1 cytoplasmic tail fused to the transmembrane domain of the human Trk-A receptor: TrkPC1 wild-type and control Trk truncated peptides were expressed at comparable levels and localized at the plasma membrane. Ca(2+) measurements were performed in cells co-transfected with PC1 chimeras and the cytoplasmic Ca(2+)-sensitive photoprotein aequorin, upon activation of the phosphoinositide pathway by ATP, that, via purinoceptors, is coupled to the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. The expression of TrkPC1 peptide, but not of its truncated form, enhanced the ATP-evoked cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations. When Ca(2+) assays were performed in HeLa cells characterized by Ca(2+) stores greater than those of HEK-293 cells, the histamine-evoked cytosolic Ca(2+) increase was enhanced by TrkPC1 expression, even in absence of external Ca(2+). These observations indicate that the C-terminal tail of PC1 in kidney and other epithelial cells upregulates a Ca(2+) channel activity also involved in the release of intracellular stores.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0006-291x(02)03011-5DOI Listing
February 2003