Publications by authors named "Sabrina M Chabregas"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Production of a His-tagged canecystatin in transgenic sugarcane and subsequent purification.

Biotechnol Prog 2008 Sep-Oct;24(5):1060-6

Dept of Genetic and Evolution, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, Brazil.

Transgenic plants have been used widely as expression systems of recombinant proteins in recent years. This process can be an efficient alternative for the large-scale production of proteins. In this work, we present the establishment of transgenic sugarcane expressing a His-tagged canecystatin under the control of the maize ubiquitin promoter. A number of studies have demonstrated that cystatins, which are natural inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, can be used for protection against insect attacks. A transformed sugarcane plant that presented high levels of (HIS)CaneCPI-1 expression, was selected for the purification of this protein through affinity chromatography in a nickel column. This purified (HIS)CaneCPI-1 was immunodetected using a polyclonal antibody, which was also able to detect the (HIS)CaneCPI-1 in a crude extract from transgenic plant leaves. Assays of inhibitory activity performed with the purified (HIS)CaneCPI-1 revealed its ability to inhibit the catalytic activity of midgut cysteine proteinase partially purified from the sugarcane weevil Sphenophorus levis and human cathepsin L in nanomolar order. These studies demonstrate that sugarcane is a viable expression system for recombinant protein production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/btpr.45DOI Listing
April 2009

Transcriptionally active transposable elements in recent hybrid sugarcane.

Plant J 2005 Dec;44(5):707-17

Departamento de Botânica, IB-USP, São Paulo, Brazil.

Transposable elements (TEs) are considered to be important components of the maintenance and diversification of genomes. The recent increase in genome sequence data has created an opportunity to evaluate the impact of these active mobile elements on the evolution of plant genomes. Analysis of the sugarcane transcriptome identified 267 clones with significant similarity to previously described plant TEs. After full cDNA sequencing, 68 sugarcane TE clones were assigned to 11 families according to their best sequence alignment against a fully characterized element. Expression was further investigated through a combined study utilizing electronic Northerns, macroarray, transient and stable sugarcane transformation. Newly synthesized cDNA probes from flower, leaf roll, apical meristem and callus tissues confirm previous results. Callus was identified as the tissue with the highest number of TEs being expressed, revealing that tissue culture drastically induced the expression of different elements. No tissue-specific family was identified. Different representatives within a TE family displayed differential expression patterns, showing that each family presented expression in almost every tissue. Transformation experiments demonstrated that most Hopscotch clone-derived U3 regions are, indeed, active promoters, although under a strong transcriptional regulation. This is a large-scale study about the expression pattern of TEs and indicates that mobile genetic elements are transcriptionally active in the highly polyploid and complex sugarcane genome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2005.02579.xDOI Listing
December 2005

Differential usage of two in-frame translational start codons regulates subcellular localization of Arabidopsis thaliana THI1.

J Cell Sci 2003 Jan;116(Pt 2):285-91

Departamento de Genética, Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 83, 13400-970, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil.

Arabidopsis thaliana THI1 is encoded by a single nuclear gene and directed simultaneously to mitochondria and chloroplasts from a single major transcript. In vitro transcription/translation experiments revealed the presence of two translational products by the differential usage of two in-frame translational start codons. The coupling site-specific mutations on the THI1 encoding sequence with green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene fusions showed that translation initiation at the first AUG directs translocation of THI1 to chloroplasts. However, when translation starts from the second AUG, THI1 is addressed to mitochondria. Analysis of the translation efficiency of thi1 mRNA revealed that the best context for translation initiation is to use the first AUG. In addition, a suboptimal context in the vicinity of the second AUG initiation codon, next to a stable stem-and-loop structure that is likely to slow translation, has been noted. The fact that translation preferentially occurs in the first AUG of this protein suggests a high requirement for TH1 in chloroplasts. Although the frequency of upstream AUG translation is higher, according to the first AUG rule, initiation at the second AUG deviates significantly from Kozak's consensus. It suggests leaky ribosomal scanning, reinitiation or the internal entry of ribosomes to assure mitochondrial protein import.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.00228DOI Listing
January 2003