Publications by authors named "Saba Jalalifar"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Immunometabolism in human brucellosis: An emerging field of investigation.

Microb Pathog 2021 Sep 28;158:105115. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; Research Center for Molecular Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Electronic address:

In recent years, extreme attention has been focused on the role of immunometabolism in the regulation of immune cell responses in healthy individuals during infection, autoimmunity, and cancer. In the infection biology area, it has been shown that there is a close relationship between the immune system and the host metabolic changes. Brucella species is an intracellular coccobacillus that infects humans and mammals, which led to brucellosis. Brucella species with host-specific evolutionary mechanisms allow it to hide from or manipulate cellular immunity and achieve intracellular persistence. Intracellular bacterial pathogens such as Brucella species also employ host cell resources to replicate and persist inside the host. Targeting these host systems is one promising strategy for developing novel antimicrobials to tackle intracellular infections. This study will summarize the role of metabolic reprogramming in immune cells and their relationship to brucellosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2021.105115DOI Listing
September 2021

Role of microbiota-derived short-chain fatty acids in nervous system disorders.

Biomed Pharmacother 2021 Jul 8;139:111661. Epub 2021 May 8.

Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

During the past decade, accumulating evidence from the research highlights the suggested effects of bacterial communities of the human gut microbiota and their metabolites on health and disease. In this regard, microbiota-derived metabolites and their receptors, beyond the immune system, maintain metabolism homeostasis, which is essential to maintain the host's health by balancing the utilization and intake of nutrients. It has been shown that gut bacterial dysbiosis can cause pathology and altered bacterial metabolites' formation, resulting in dysregulation of the immune system and metabolism. The short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyrate, acetate, and succinate, are produced due to the fermentation process of bacteria in the gut. It has been noted remodeling in the gut microbiota metabolites associated with the pathophysiology of several neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stress, anxiety, depression, autism, vascular dementia, schizophrenia, stroke, and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, among others. This review will discuss the current evidence from the most significant studies dealing with some SCFAs from gut microbial metabolism with selected neurological disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2021.111661DOI Listing
July 2021

The pathogenic, therapeutic and diagnostic role of exosomal microRNA in the autoimmune diseases.

J Neuroimmunol 2021 Sep 24;358:577640. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Exosomes are a nano-vesicle surrounded by a bilipid layer that can release from almost all cells and could be detected in tissues and biological liquids. These vesicles contain lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (including DNA, mRNA, and miRNA) inside and on the exosomes' surface constitute their content. Exosomes can transfer their cargo into the recipient cell, which can modify recipient cells' biological activities. Recently it has been deciphering that the miRNA pattern of exosomes reveals the cellular pathophysiological situation and modifies various biological processes. Increasing data regarding exosomes highlights that the exosomes and their cargo, especially miRNAs, are implicated in the pathophysiology of various disorders, such as autoimmune disease. The current evidence on the deciphering of mechanisms in which exosomal miRNAs contributed to autoimmunity was indicated that exosomal miRNA might hold information that can reprogram the function of many of the immune cells involved in autoimmune diseases' pathogenesis. In the present study, we summarized the pathogenic role of exosomal miRNAs in several autoimmune diseases, including myasthenia gravis (MG), psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), type 1 diabetes (T1D), multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjogren's Syndrome (SS), systemic sclerosis (SSc), vitiligo, and autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Moreover, in this work, we present evidence of the potential role of exosomal miRNAs as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in autoimmune diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroim.2021.577640DOI Listing
September 2021

Prevalence, population structure, distribution of serotypes, pilus islands and resistance genes among erythromycin-resistant colonizing and invasive Streptococcus agalactiae isolates recovered from pregnant and non-pregnant women in Isfahan, Iran.

BMC Microbiol 2021 05 4;21(1):139. Epub 2021 May 4.

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Hezar-Jerib Street, Isfahan, Iran.

Background: The information on antibiotic resistance and molecular features of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are essential for epidemiological purposes as well as vaccine development. Therefore, we aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance profiles and molecular characteristics of GBS isolates in Isfahan, Iran. A total number of 72 colonizing and invasive GBS were collected from pregnant and non-pregnant women. The GBS isolates were analyzed for resistance profiles, capsular genotyping, and detection of PI-1, PI-2a, PI-2b, hvgA, ermB, ermTR, lnuB and, mefA genes. Besides, erythromycin-resistant strains were subjected to multilocus sequence typing (MLST).

Results: The prevalence of colonizing and invasive GBS were 11 and 0.05%, respectively. The frequency of capsular serotypes was as follows: III (26.3%), Ia (20.83%), Ib and V (each 15.2%), IV (9.7%), II (8.3%), VII (2.7%), and VI (1.3%). Overall frequencies of PIs were as follows: PI-1, 37.5%, PI-1 + PI-2a, 30.5%, PI-1 + PI-2b, 29.1% and PI-2b, 2.7%. Two maternal colonizing GBS (2.6%) were hvgA positive and were belonged to ST-17/CPS-III/PI-1 + PI-2b lineage. Among 30(41.6%) erythromycin resistant GBS, 21 isolates (70%) harbored ermB gene, followed by ermTR (23.3%) and mefA (10%). One clindamycin-resistant isolate harbored the lnuB gene. MLST analysis revealed the following five clonal complexes (CCs) and nine STs: (CC-19/ST-335, ST-19, and ST-197), (CC-12/ST-43, ST-12), (CC-23/ST-163, ST-23), (CC-17/ST-17) and (CC-4/ST-16).

Conclusion: The study shows an alarmingly high prevalence of erythromycin-resistant GBS in Iran. In addition, we report dissemination of ST-335/CPS-III clone associated with tetracycline and erythromycin resistance in our region. The distribution of capsular and pilus genotypes varies between invasive and colonizing GBS that could be helpful for vaccine development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12866-021-02186-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8096152PMC
May 2021

The emerging role of probiotics as a mitigation strategy against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Arch Virol 2021 Jul 20;166(7):1819-1840. Epub 2021 Mar 20.

Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

COVID-19 is an acute respiratory infection accompanied by pneumonia caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has affected millions of people globally. To date, there are no highly efficient therapies for this infection. Probiotic bacteria can interact with the gut microbiome to strengthen the immune system, enhance immune responses, and induce appropriate immune signaling pathways. Several probiotics have been confirmed to reduce the duration of bacterial or viral infections. Immune fitness may be one of the approaches by which protection against viral infections can be reinforced. In general, prevention is more efficient than therapy in fighting viral infections. Thus, probiotics have emerged as suitable candidates for controlling these infections. During the COVID-19 pandemic, any approach with the capacity to induce mucosal and systemic reactions could potentially be useful. Here, we summarize findings regarding the effectiveness of various probiotics for preventing virus-induced respiratory infectious diseases, especially those that could be employed for COVID-19 patients. However, the benefits of probiotics are strain-specific, and it is necessary to identify the bacterial strains that are scientifically established to be beneficial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-021-05036-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7980799PMC
July 2021

Molecular Characterization of Hospital- and Community-Acquired Isolates among Nonpregnant Adults in Isfahan, Iran.

Adv Biomed Res 2020 30;9:44. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Department of Bacteriology and Virology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Background: The increasing incidence of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) infection among nonpregnant adults has become of growing clinical and public health concern. The current study investigated the distribution of important virulence determinants and antibiotic susceptibility of GBS isolates causing community acquired (CA) and hospital acquired (HA) infections among nonpregnant adults.

Materials And Methods: A total of 62 GBS, including 31 CA GBS and 31 HA GBS, were collected from a teaching hospital in Isfahan, Iran. Capsular polysaccharide genotypes (CPS), PI 1, PI 2a, PI 2b, and hypervirulent GBS adhesin (hvgA) virulence genes and antibiotic resistance profiling were determined.

Results: There were 19 (30.6%) cases of underlying disease that diabetes mellitus (20.9%) was most common. The rate of multidrug resistant GBS strains was accounted for 29%. Distribution of macrolide resistant phenotypes was as follows: constitutive macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramin B (MLSB) (15 isolates); inducible resistance to MLSB; and L phenotype (each 5 isolates) and M phenotype (1 isolate). V and Ia serotypes were the most predominant capsular type in HA GBS and CA GBS isolates, respectively. The most frequent pilus types were PI 1, PI 1+PI 2a, PI 1+PI 2b, and PI 2a. PI 1 and PI 1+PI 2a had significantly different distributions between CA and HA GBS isolates. Three CA GBS isolates (9.6%) were positive for hvgA gene that belonged to clonal complex 17/sequence type 17/CPS III/PI 1+PI 2b lineage.

Conclusion: There was a significant difference in the distribution of PIs among CA GBS and HA GBS isolates in our region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/abr.abr_25_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7792884PMC
September 2020

Bacterial co-infections with SARS-CoV-2.

IUBMB Life 2020 10 8;72(10):2097-2111. Epub 2020 Aug 8.

Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

The pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has affected millions of people worldwide. To date, there are no proven effective therapies for this virus. Efforts made to develop antiviral strategies for the treatment of COVID-19 are underway. Respiratory viral infections, such as influenza, predispose patients to co-infections and these lead to increased disease severity and mortality. Numerous types of antibiotics such as azithromycin have been employed for the prevention and treatment of bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infections in patients with a viral respiratory infection (e.g., SARS-CoV-2). Although antibiotics do not directly affect SARS-CoV-2, viral respiratory infections often result in bacterial pneumonia. It is possible that some patients die from bacterial co-infection rather than virus itself. To date, a considerable number of bacterial strains have been resistant to various antibiotics such as azithromycin, and the overuse could render those or other antibiotics even less effective. Therefore, bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infection are considered critical risk factors for the severity and mortality rates of COVID-19. Also, the antibiotic-resistant as a result of overusing must be considered. In this review, we will summarize the bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infection in some featured respiratory viral infections, especially COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/iub.2356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7436231PMC
October 2020

The importance of intracellular bacterial biofilm in infectious diseases.

Microb Pathog 2020 Oct 22;147:104393. Epub 2020 Jul 22.

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Electronic address:

Various bacterial species, previously known as extracellular pathogens, can reside inside different host cells by adapting to intracellular modes by forming microbial aggregates with similar characteristics to bacterial biofilms. Additionally, bacterial invasion of human cells leads to failure in antibiotic therapy, as most conventional anti-bacterial agents cannot reach intracellular biofilm in normal concentrations. Various studies have shown that bacteria such as uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Borrelia burgdorferi,Moraxella catarrhalis, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumonia, and group A Streptococci produce biofilm-like structures within the host cells. For the first time in this review, we will describe and discuss the new information about intracellular bacterial biofilm formation and its importance in bacterial infectious diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2020.104393DOI Listing
October 2020

Role of microRNAs in Staphylococcus aureus infection: Potential biomarkers and mechanism.

IUBMB Life 2020 09 9;72(9):1856-1869. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

Staphylococcus aureus is known as a common pathogen that colonizes 30% of healthy humans. Additionally, this bacterium can cause a number of serious infections, that is, endocarditis, bacteremia, pneumonia, wound, skin infections, and tissue abscesses. A variety of cellular and molecular pathways and targets are involved in response against S. aureus. Among them, microRNAs (miRNAs) have crucial roles in response against S. aureus. In this regard, it has been shown that these molecules exert their regulatory roles via modulating a wide range of events, such as inflammatory reactions, host innate, and adaptive immunity. Current works have provided insight into the crucial involvement of miRNAs in immune defense toward Staphylococcal infections. Herein, we highlighted the current findings on the deregulation of different miRNAs in S. aureus-infected cells. Moreover, we summarized the mechanisms and targets of miRNAs in S. aureus infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/iub.2325DOI Listing
September 2020

Burden of Infection among Patients in Western Asia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Iran J Public Health 2019 Sep;48(9):1589-1599

Razi Clinical Research Development Center, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

Background: is the most common causes of hospital-acquired diarrhea affecting particularly hospitalized patients globally. This organism has re-emerged in recent years with significant morbidity and mortality. The present study aimed to estimate the burden of infection (CDI) and to acquire information on the overall rates of community- and hospital-acquired CDI in western Asia.

Methods: A systematic literature search was performed to identify articles published from the eight Persian Gulf countries in western Asia including Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates in the electronic databases within Jan of 2000 to Dec of 2017. Then, 20 publications which met our inclusion criteria were selected for data extraction and analysis by Comprehensive Meta-Analysis Software.

Results: Twenty studies reported the prevalence of toxigenic strains of among patients from Persian Gulf countries, of these the pooled prevalence of CDI was 9% (95% CI: 6.5%-12.5%). Totally, 8 studies showed the prevalence of hospital-acquired CDI, from those studies the prevalence of CDI was estimated 8.4% (95% CI: 4.9%-14.1%). Moreover, 7 studies reported the prevalence of community-acquired CDI, from those studies the prevalence of CDI was estimated 1.8% (95% CI: 1.2%-2.9%).

Conclusion: The prevalence of CDI in western Asia is lower than southern and eastern region. Moreover, the lower prevalence of community-acquired CDI compared to hospital-acquired CDI, indicate that the source of infection in western Asia is more likely in the hospitals.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6825664PMC
September 2019

Determination of surface proteins profile, capsular genotyping, and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of Group B Streptococcus isolated from urinary tract infection of Iranian patients.

BMC Res Notes 2019 Jul 19;12(1):437. Epub 2019 Jul 19.

Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Objectives: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important opportunistic bacteria that causes a wide range of infections including neonatal sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia, soft tissue and urinary tract infections (UTI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, surface proteins and capsular types of GBS isolates.

Results: 100 of UTI isolates were confirmed as GBS. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern showed that 95% of GBS isolates were resistant to tetracycline, followed by erythromycin (52%), clindamycin (47%), levofloxacin (9%) and penicillin, cefepime, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone each with (8%), and vancomycin 1%. Common capsular types were III, Ib, V, II, Ia and IV respectively and the distribution of surface protein genes was as follows: rib (40%), alpha-c (22%), alp2/3 (18%) and epsilon (15%), and alp4 gene was not detected in the isolates. Our findings showed the relationship between capsular types with Alpha-like proteins, as well as reduced sensitivity to antibiotics, so the performance of antibiotic surveillance programs is recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4428-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6642507PMC
July 2019

Correction to: Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility, class I and II integrons among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hospitalized patients in Isfahan, Iran.

BMC Res Notes 2019 02 12;12(1):79. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Students Research Committee, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Hezar Jarib St, Isfahan, Iran.

Following publication of the original article [1], an error was reported in the tables due to a typesetting mistake. Table 3 is presented as a duplicate of Table 2. In this Correction, the correct presentation of Table 3 is shown.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-019-4122-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6371590PMC
February 2019

Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility, class I and II integrons among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from hospitalized patients in Isfahan, Iran.

BMC Res Notes 2018 Nov 12;11(1):806. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Students Research Committee, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Hezar Jarib St, Isfahan, Iran.

Objectives: The role of integrons in the transfer of antibiotic resistance is one of the important issues, therefore, this study is aimed to investigate antibiotic resistance pattern and prevalence of class 1 and 2 integrons in P. aeruginosa isolated.

Results: Out of 72 confirmed P. aeruginosa isolates, 50% were from ICU patients. Antibacterial susceptibility pattern showed that isolates were most resistant to ceftazidime (76.4%) and colistin was the most effective antibiotic (100%) and molecular analysis of class I and II integrons showed 55.5% and 29.1% of isolates were positive, respectively and the proportions of MDR isolates were significantly higher among integron-positive isolates with 73.6% compared to negative isolates with 22.9%. Our results showed that there was a correlation among class 1 and 2 integrons with MDR P. aeruginosa isolates. According to the importance of integrons in acquisition and dissemination of antibiotics resistance genes, the performance of antibiotic surveillance programs and investigating the role of integrons is recommended to control the spreading of antibiotics resistance genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-018-3901-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6233361PMC
November 2018
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