Publications by authors named "Saba Akram"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A GBS-based GWAS analysis of adaptability and yield traits in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

J Appl Genet 2021 Feb 30;62(1):27-41. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology College. Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (NIAB-C, PIEAS), Jhang Road, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

Wheat is a foremost food grain of Pakistan and occupies a vital position in agricultural policies of the country. Wheat demand will be increased by 60% by 2050 which is a serious concern to meet this demand. Conventional breeding approaches are not enough to meet the demand of growing human population. It is paramount to integrate underutilized genetic diversity into wheat gene pool through efficient and accurate breeding tools and technology. In this study, we present the genetic analysis of a 312 diverse pre-breeding lines using DArT-seq SNPs seeking to elucidate the genetic components of emergence percentage, heading time, plant height, lodging, thousand kernel weight, and yield (Yd) which resulted in detection of 201 significant (p value < 10) and 61 highly significant associations (p value < 1.45 × 10). More importantly, chromosomes 1B and 2A carried loci linked to Yd in two different seasons, and an increase of up to 8.20% is possible in Yd by positive allele mining. We identified seven lines with > 4 positive alleles for Yd whose pedigree carried Aegilops squarrosa as one of the parents providing evidence that Aegilops species, apart from imparting resistance against biotic stresses, may also provide alleles for yield enhancement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13353-020-00593-1DOI Listing
February 2021

Mapping of QTLs Associated with Yield and Yield Related Traits in Durum Wheat ( Desf.) Under Irrigated and Drought Conditions.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Mar 30;21(7). Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Corrensstr. 3, Seeland OT, 06466 Gatersleben, Germany.

Global durum wheat consumption ( Desf.) is ahead of its production. One reason for this is abiotic stress, e.g., drought. Breeding for resistance to drought is complicated by the lack of fast, reproducible screening techniques and the inability to routinely create defined and repeatable water stress conditions. Here, we report the first analysis of dissection of yield and yield-related traits in durum wheat in Pakistan, seeking to elucidate the genetic components of yield and agronomic traits. Analysis of several traits revealed a total of 221 (160 with logarithm of odds (LOD) > 2 ≤ 3 and 61 with LOD > 3) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) distributed on all fourteen durum wheat chromosomes, of which 109 (78 with LOD > 2 ≤ 3 and 31 with LOD > 3) were observed in 2016-17 (S1) and 112 (82 with LOD > 2 ≤ 3 and 30 with LOD > 3) were observed in 2017-18 (S2). Allelic profiles of yield QTLs on chromosome 2A and 7B indicate that allele A of and allele B of can enhance the Yd up to 6.16% in control and 5.27% under drought. Moreover, if combined, a yield gain of up to 11% would be possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21072372DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7177892PMC
March 2020

Adequacy of Completion of Computed Tomography Scan Request Forms at a Tertiary Care Center in Pakistan: A Clinical Audit.

Cureus 2018 Oct 20;10(10):e3470. Epub 2018 Oct 20.

Internal Medicine, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Quaid-E-Azam Medical College, Bahawalpur, PAK.

Introduction A lot of radiation exposure to a population comes from medical sources. Clinicians must justify the need for radiology procedures on a request form to prevent unnecessary scans and radiation exposure. Moreover, the properly-filled form will help to identify the patient correctly and provide clinical details to make a radiological diagnosis. Objective The purpose of the study was to audit the computed tomography (CT) scan request forms and find out the adequacy of completion of the request forms at Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Materials and methods We scrutinized 300 CT scan request forms received at the tertiary care center, Bahawal Victoria Hospital. We checked the adequacy of filling of different fields in the request forms like name, address, clinical and surgical history, and the name of required examination. We also looked for the missing subjects in the CT request form currently used in our hospital like the contact numbers of the patient and the doctor, the identity of the requesting doctor, renal function tests (RFTs), last menstrual period (LMP), and history of allergy. The results were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 20 (SPSS 20) (IBM, NY, USA) and Microsoft Office Excel Worksheet (Microsoft Corporation, NM, USA). Results The name of the patient was present in 100% of the request forms, surname in 27.66%, age in 73.33%, gender in 64.33%, date in 91.66%, bed number in 37.90%, address in 1% and the name of required examination in 99.6%. Information about diagnosis included clinical history in 50.66%, past surgical history in 1%, laboratory investigations in 1%, and clinical examination in 8.66% of the forms. All the forms had the name and signature of the referring consultant, but only 10.33% forms contained the identity of the requesting junior doctor. More than half of the request forms for CT scan provided RFTs. We found no record of the allergy, LMP, and the contact number of the doctor and the patient. Conclusion The information provided in the CT scan request forms was inadequate. The practice of filling these forms needs to be improved to protect the patients from unnecessary radiation exposure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.3470DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6303179PMC
October 2018

The Spectrum of Beta-thalassemia Mutations in Couples Referred for Chorionic Villus Sampling at Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur.

Cureus 2018 Sep 7;10(9):e3265. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Medical Ward, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Quaid-E-Azam Medical College, Bahawalpur, PAK.

Introduction The prevalence of beta-thalassemia mutations is different in various castes, regions, and ethnic groups. By knowing this prevalence, we can conduct a targeted screening of only the high-risk population and only for the specific mutations that are prevalent in each group. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the regional, caste-wise, and ethnic spectrum of beta-thalassemia mutations in couples referred for a prenatal diagnosis. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted at the thalassemia unit, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from October 1, 2015, to May 15, 2018. After obtaining informed consent, chorionic villus sampling (CVS) was performed in 144 women having a gestational age of 12 to 16 weeks. We took blood samples of the couples. A chromosomal analysis for 13 mutations was done at Punjab Thalassaemia Prevention Programme (PTPP), Lahore. The researchers filled a questionnaire with all the details of couples like ethnicity, caste, and region. Results The most common mutation was Fr 8-9(+G), accounting for 29.8%, followed by IVS 1-5(G-C), which was 28.9%. We did not find three mutations in any chromosome. Fr 8-9 (+G) was the most common mutation among Punjabis and Pakhtoons. IVS 1-5 (G-C) was the most common mutation among Saraikis and Urdu-speaking people. In Rajputs, Arains, Jatts, and Pathans, Fr 8-9 (+G) was the most common mutation. IVS 1-5 (G-C) was the most common mutation among Sheikhs, Balochs, Syeds, and Miscellaneous. IVS 1-5 (G-C) was the most common mutation in the Bahawalpur division and Ghotki (Sindh) while Fr 8-9 (+G) was the most common mutation in the Multan division. The p-value of all the results was <0.001. Conclusion There is an ethnic, caste-wise, and regional distribution of mutations. We can conduct a targeted screening of the population and provide counseling about chorionic villus sampling by using this local data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.3265DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6221512PMC
September 2018

The Frequency of Hepatitis C and its Risk Factors Among Health Care Providers at Tehsil Headquarter Hospital, Hasilpur, Pakistan.

Cureus 2018 Aug 21;10(8):e3176. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Medical Ward, Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Quaid-E-Azam Medical College, Bahawalpur, PAK.

Introduction Hepatitis C has emerged as a big challenge for Pakistan. Health care providers are at increased risk of being infected due to tremendous exposure. Aim The purpose of this study was to find the prevalence of hepatitis C, its risk factors especially its occupational risk factors and preventive measures practiced by health care providers of Tehsil Head Quarter Hospital, Hasilpur, Pakistan. Materials and methods Blood samples were collected, and rapid chromatography strips were used for diagnostic purpose. A questionnaire was used for data collection. After analyzing the data, results were summarized. Results The prevalence of Hepatitis was 5.17%. Those who used gloves were 67.24%. A history of needle stick injury was present in 47.41%, and 49.13% knew about the spread of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Just 18.96% knew about the treatment plan, and 19.83% had attended a workshop on preventive measures of infectious diseases in healthcare settings. Conclusion The frequency of HCV among health care providers is high. Awareness programs and training workshops should be mandatory to increase knowledge about hepatitis C prevention. It will decrease the incidence of hepatitis C infection among health care workers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.3176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6197530PMC
August 2018