Publications by authors named "S S Al-Abdulwahab"

5 Publications

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Back extension exercises decompress the spinal root and improve standing mobility in patients with sub-acute lumbosacral radiculopathy.

Somatosens Mot Res 2016 Sep - Dec;33(3-4):196-199. Epub 2016 Nov 13.

a Rehabilitation Sciences Department , King Saud University , Riyadh , Saudi Arabia.

Purpose: Repeated back extension exercises (RBEEs) have been reported to cause changes in the distribution and intensity of radicular symptoms. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of RBEEs on the neurophysiology of the compromised nerve root and on standing mobility and pain intensity in patients with sub-acute and chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy (LSR).

Subjects And Methods: A total of 40 patients with unilateral sub-acute/chronic LSR voluntarily participated in the study; the patients performed three sets of 10 RBEEs in the prone position with 1 min of rest between the sets. The soleus H-reflex, standing mobility, and pain intensity were recorded before and after the RBEEs.

Results: The results of the study showed that the RBEEs significantly improved the H-reflex, standing mobility, and pain intensity in patients with sub-acute LSR (p < .01); there was not a significant improvement in the patients with chronic LSR (p < .61).

Conclusion: RBEEs in the prone position are recommended for improving the neurophysiological function of the compromised nerve root and standing mobility in patients with sub-acute LSR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08990220.2016.1251895DOI Listing
January 2018

The effect of various degrees of foot posture on standing balance in a healthy adult population.

Somatosens Mot Res 2015 7;32(3):172-6. Epub 2015 Sep 7.

a Department of Rehabilitation Health Sciences , College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University , Riyadh , Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Purpose: Foot biomechanics plays a significant role in the quality of standing and walking. It has been believed that even minor biomechanical alterations in the foot support surface may influence strategies to maintain body standing balance. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of various degrees of foot posture on static and dynamic standing balance components in a healthy adult population.

Subjects And Methods: A convenience sample of 41 healthy adult subjects with a mean age of 24.3 ± 6.4 years and a body mass index (BMI) of 29 kg/m(2) participated in this study. On the basis of foot posture index (FPI), the participants were allocated into either group A or B. Group A included 16 subjects with an FPI range of 6-11 whereas group B included 25 subjects with an FPI range of 0-5. Standing balance components were analyzed using computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) by the Modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction on Balance (mCTSIB) and the limit of stability (LOS).

Results: Spearman's correlation coefficient showed a significant correlation between the standing dynamic balance and FPI in group B but not in group A. Moreover, it also showed no significant correlation between the standing static balance component and FPI in either group A or B.

Conclusion: This study concluded that higher degrees of FPI might have an effect on standing dynamic balance in healthy subjects. These components may require extra attention during the preventive aspects of rehabilitation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/08990220.2015.1029608DOI Listing
June 2016

Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the gluteus medius improves the gait of children with cerebral palsy.

NeuroRehabilitation 2009 ;24(3):209-17

King Saud University, Rehabilitation Sciences Department, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Unlabelled: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the gluteus medius muscles using a surface electrode during functional walking training has never been reported as a management option to improve gait in spastic diplegic children.

Purpose: This study was investigates the short and longer term effects of simultaneous continuous NMES of both hip abductors during walking on the temporal-spatial gait characteristics and hip adductor muscle tone in children with spastic diplegia caused by cerebral palsy (CP).

Subjects: Three groups of subjects participated: an experimental group of twenty-one ambulant spastic diplegic children; a CP control group containing ten ambulant spastic diplegic children; and a healthy control group with twenty normal children.

Method: The experimental group received three different NMES management programs. The first NMES program was designed to evaluate the immediate short-term effects of simultaneous continuous NMES of both gluteus medius muscles during walking. The second NMES program aimed to evaluate the effect of 15 minutes of simultaneous and continuous NMES of both gluteus medius muscles during walking, three sessions a day for a week. The third program was similar to the first and was designed to detect any additional changes in gait after full adaptation to NMES and completion of the second program. A dual channel stimulator with self-adhesive electrodes at the tolerable motor threshold level was used with a frequency of 20 Hz and pulse width of 50 micros. The effect of NMES programs was assessed using a three-dimensional gait analysis system and the Modified Ashworth Scale.

Results: Significant improvement in the temporal-spatial parameters and hip adductor muscle tone of the experimental group (p < 0.001-0.05) was observed.

Conclusion: The NMES management programs used in this study improved the gait of spastic diplegic CP children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/NRE-2009-0470DOI Listing
August 2009

Hallux valgus and preferred shoe types among young healthy Saudi Arabian females.

Ann Saudi Med 2000 May-July;20(3-4):319-21

Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5144/0256-4947.2000.319DOI Listing
May 2007

The effects of aging on muscle strength and functional ability of healthy Saudi Arabian males.

Ann Saudi Med 1999 May-Jun;19(3):211-5

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Background: Loss of muscle strength as a result of normal aging is reported to impair functional ability in various communities. The purpose of this study was to determine the age at which loss of muscle strength and functional ability begins, and to establish a preliminary baseline for the pattern of changes in muscle strength and functional ability of aging in adult healthy Saudi Arabian males.

Subjects And Methods: A sample of 160 healthy Saudi Arabian males aged 20-89 years participated in this study. The subjects were divided into seven age groups, each representing a decade. Maximum isometric A centAAmakeA centAA strength of bilateral quadriceps muscles were measured using a hand-held dynamometer. Functional ability tests that included stair walking, timed-up-and-go and balance tests were also performed and timed using a digital stopwatch.

Results: Muscle strength and functional ability remained unchanged in the 20- and 30-year-old age groups. Around the age of 40, muscle strength and functional ability began to gradually decline. Muscle strength of males in their twenties was 380+/-62N and 330+/-60N in the right (RT) and left (LT) quadriceps, respectively. A decline with aging is represented by 190+/-40N and 110+/-30N in the RT and LT quadriceps muscles, respectively, by the eighth decade of life. Stair-walking, timed up-and-go and balance tests in the second decade were 4+/-1 sec, 8+/-2 sec and 130+/-20 sec, respectively, against 15+/-4 sec, 26+/-7 sec and 15+/-5 sec in the eighth decade. One-way ANOVA test showed that muscle strength and functional ability differed (P<0.01) among decades, except between the second and third decades (P<0.31). Age, muscle strength and functional ability displayed a significant relationship (P<0.001).

Conclusion: Loss of muscle strength and functional ability seem to begin in the fourth decade of life. The changes in muscle strength and functional ability have a significant relationship to aging. Clinically, these results may provide clinicians with a guide to the strength level of normal quadriceps and the functional ability of adult healthy Saudi Arabian males in relation to the normal aging process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5144/0256-4947.1999.211DOI Listing
October 2012