Publications by authors named "S Rosell��"

163 Publications

Snail1 is required for the maintenance of the pancreatic acinar phenotype.

Oncotarget 2016 Jan;7(4):4468-82

Programa de Recerca en Càncer, Institut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques (IMIM), 08003 Barcelona, Spain.

The Snail1 transcriptional factor is required for correct embryonic development, yet its expression in adult animals is very limited and its functional roles are not evident. We have now conditionally inactivated Snail1 in adult mice and analyzed the phenotype of these animals. Snail1 ablation rapidly altered pancreas structure: one month after Snail1 depletion, acinar cells were markedly depleted, and pancreas accumulated adipose tissue. Snail1 expression was not detected in the epithelium but was in pancreatic mesenchymal cells (PMCs). Snail1 ablation in cultured PMCs downregulated the expression of several β-catenin/Tcf-4 target genes, modified the secretome of these cells and decreased their ability to maintain acinar markers in cultured pancreas cells. Finally, Snail1 deficiency modified the phenotype of pancreatic tumors generated in transgenic mice expressing c-myc under the control of the elastase promoter. Specifically, Snail1 depletion did not significantly alter the size of the tumors but accelerated acinar-ductal metaplasia. These results demonstrate that Snail1 is expressed in PMCs and plays a pivotal role in maintaining acinar cells within the pancreas in normal and pathological conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.6785DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4826219PMC
January 2016

Safety and preliminary immunogenicity of Cuban pneumococcal conjugate vaccine candidate in healthy children: a randomized phase I clinical trial.

Vaccine 2014 Sep 26;32(41):5266-70. Epub 2014 Jul 26.

Center for Biomolecular Chemistry, 200 and 21 Street, Playa, Havana 11600, Cuba.

A new heptavalent conjugate vaccine (PCV7-TT) is under development in Cuba. PCV7-TT contains 2 μg of serotypes 1, 5, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F and 4 μg of 6B, each one conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT). This vaccine was designed with the serotypes that cause most invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) worldwide. In the present study, we investigated the safety and explored the immunogenicity of PCV7-TT during a controlled, randomized and double blind clinical trial phase I in 4-5-year-old children. PCV7-TT was well tolerated and as safe as Synflorix used as control vaccine. Following a single-dose vaccination, all individual serotypes included in PCV7-TT induced statistically significant increase of IgG GMC and OPA GMT. These are the first clinical results of PCV7-TT in children and they pave the way toward next clinical trials in children and infants. This clinical trial was published in the Cuban Public Register of Clinical Trials with code RPCEC00000173.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.06.094DOI Listing
September 2014

[Virulence blocking antibiotics. Anti-bacterial agents with completely new action mechanisms].

Lakartidningen 2009 Sep 30-Oct 6;106(40):2543-5

Creative Antibiotics AB, Umeå

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November 2009

Virulence blockers as alternatives to antibiotics: type III secretion inhibitors against Gram-negative bacteria.

J Intern Med 2008 Jul 3;264(1):17-29. Epub 2008 Apr 3.

Innate Pharmaceuticals AB, Umestan Företagspark, Umeå, Sweden.

In recent years mounting problems related to antibiotic-resistant bacteria have resulted in the prediction that we are entering the preantibiotic era. A way of preventing such a development would be to introduce novel antibacterial medicines with modes of action distinct from conventional antibiotics. Recent studies of bacterial virulence factors and toxins have resulted in increased understanding of the way in which pathogenic bacteria manipulate host cellular processes. This knowledge may now be used to develop novel antibacterial medicines that disarm pathogenic bacteria. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is known to be a potent virulence mechanism shared by a broad spectrum of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria that interact with human, animal and plant hosts by injecting effector proteins into the cytosol of host cells. Diseases, such as bubonic plague, shigellosis, salmonellosis, typhoid fever, pulmonary infections, sexually transmitted chlamydia and diarrhoea largely depend on the bacterial proteins injected by the T3SS machinery. Recently a number of T3SS inhibitors have been identified using screening-based approaches. One class of inhibitors, the salicylidene acylhydrazides, has been subjected to chemical optimization and evaluation in several in vitro and ex vivo assays in multiple bacterial species including Yersinia spp., Chlamydia spp., Salmonella spp. and Pseudotuberculosis aeruginosa. Reports published up to date indicate that T3SS inhibitors have the potential to be developed into novel antibacterial therapeutics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2008.01941.xDOI Listing
July 2008

Giving citizens a voice in healthcare policy in Canada.

BMJ 2003 May;326(7397):1031-3

Canadian Policy Research Networks, Suite 600, 250 Albert St, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1S 2B7.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.326.7397.1031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1125934PMC
May 2003
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