Publications by authors named "S Prathibha"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Extraction of bioactive compounds from Psidium guajava leaves and its utilization in preparation of jellies.

AMB Express 2021 Mar 1;11(1):36. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Department of Biotechnology, Vignan's Foundation for Science, Technology and Research, Vadlamudi, Andhra Pradesh, 522213, India.

Psidium guajava L. (guava) is predominantly grown throughout the world and known for its medicinal properties in treating various diseases and disorders. The present work focuses on aqueous extraction of bioactive compounds from the guava leaf and its utilization in the formulation of jelly to improve the public health. The guava leaf extract has been used in the preparation of jelly with pectin (1.5 g), sugar (28 g) and lemon juice (2 mL). The prepared guava leaf extract jelly (GJ) and the control jelly (CJ, without extract) were subjected to proximate, nutritional and textural analyses besides determination of antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. GJ was found to contain carbohydrate (45.78 g/100 g), protein (3.0 g/100 g), vitamin C (6.15 mg/100 g), vitamin B3 (2.90 mg/100 g) and energy (120.6 kcal). Further, the texture analysis of CJ and GJ indicated that both the jellies showed similar properties emphasizing that the addition of guava leaf extract does not bring any change in the texture properties of jelly. GJ exhibited antimicrobial activity against various bacteria ranging from 11.4 to 13.6 mm. Similarly, GJ showed antioxidant activity of 42.38% against DPPH radical and 33.45% against hydroxyl radical. Mass spectroscopic analysis of aqueous extract confirmed the presence of esculin, quercetin, gallocatechin, 3-sinapoylquinic acid, gallic acid, citric acid and ellagic acid which are responsible for antioxidant and antimicrobial properties.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13568-021-01194-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7921237PMC
March 2021

Synchronous breast carcinoma and peritoneal mesothelioma.

Breast J 2021 Feb 23. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Breast cancer may be associated with other primary cancers via germline mutations; however, sporadic occurrences of other malignancies are rare. With increased use of advanced breast cancer imaging, including MRI and PET/CT, other incidental synchronous cancers are increasingly identified. Such cases can represent unique diagnostic and treatment challenges. Here, we present a case of a young woman diagnosed with primary breast cancer who underwent imaging studies identifying an incidental primary peritoneal mesothelioma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbj.14202DOI Listing
February 2021

Venoarteriovenous ECMO in Concomitant Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Cardiomyopathy Associated with COVID-19 Infection.

Case Rep Crit Care 2021 25;2021:8848013. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

Department of Surgery, Division of Acute Care Surgery and Critical Care, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

In the most severe cases, novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection leads to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome which may be refractory to standard medical interventions including mechanical ventilation. There are growing reports of the use of venovenous (VV) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in these cases. A subset of critically ill COVID-19 patients develops cardiomyopathy as well, manifested by cardiogenic shock with reduced ejection fraction, dysrhythmias, and subsequent increase in mortality. One strategy for managing ARDS with an element of cardiogenic shock is venoarteriovenous (VAV) ECMO. Less than 1% of the cases in the worldwide ELSO COVID-19 database employed any form of hybrid cannulation. To date, there has only been one reported case of patient salvage with arterial or partial arterial support. We present a case that demonstrates the potential role of VAV ECMO in the case of concomitant severe ARDS with cardiomyopathy in the setting of COVID-19 infection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2021/8848013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7836024PMC
January 2021

Initial diagnosis of insignificant cancer, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical small acinar proliferation, and negative have the same rate of upgrade to a Gleason score of 7 or higher on repeat prostate biopsy.

Hum Pathol 2018 09 24;79:116-121. Epub 2018 May 24.

Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address:

Extended prostate needle core biopsies are standard of care for the diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma. Subsequent biopsies may be performed for a variety of indications. Knowledge of biopsy characteristics indicating risk for progression may have utility to guide therapeutic management. Prostate needle core biopsies performed between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. Patients with at least 1 subsequent biopsy were identified. Cases were categorized by worst initial diagnosis. Gleason ≤6 carcinoma was further classified as significant or insignificant with insignificant defined as follows: ≤2 cores with carcinoma, sites with ≤50% carcinoma, and unilateral carcinoma. A total of 329 men underwent repeat biopsies. Gleason ≤6 insignificant carcinoma, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and/or atypical small acinar proliferation, and negative biopsies had a similar rate of Gleason ≥7 upon repeat biopsy (16%, 17%, 14%; P = .91). Initial biopsy diagnoses of Gleason ≤6 significant carcinoma had a higher rate of Gleason ≥7 on repeat biopsy compared with initial biopsies of Gleason ≤6 insignificant carcinoma (39%, 16%; P = .003). Within initial diagnoses of Gleason ≤6, 1 core compared with more than 1 core positive had a lower rate of Gleason ≥7 on repeat biopsy (17%, 30%), although this difference was not significant (P = .08). An initial biopsy diagnosed as Gleason ≤6 insignificant carcinoma, HGPIN and/or atypical small acinar proliferation, or negative had a similar substantial risk of Gleason ≥7 carcinoma upon subsequent biopsy. Our findings support the continued stratification of Gleason ≤6 and thus the diagnostic workup of all atypical foci to provide an accurate, thorough number of involved cores.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humpath.2018.05.011DOI Listing
September 2018

A multidisciplinary approach to sphenoid wing dysplasia presenting with pulsatile proptosis in neurofibromatosis Type 1: A rare case report.

Indian J Ophthalmol 2018 01;66(1):157-160

Department of Radiology, A C S Medical College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.

Neurofibromatosis (NF) with sphenoid wing dysplasia is a rare clinical entity. Herewith, we present a case of NF with sphenoid wing dysplasia which presented with pulsatile progressive proptosis. Other ocular symptoms or visual disturbances were absent. Diagnosis of the condition was not easy and the management was a challenging task which needed multidisciplinary approach as there were ocular, neurological, orthopedic, and dermatological manifestations. With neurosurgical intervention, reconstruction of the sphenoid wing was possible. Proptosis was corrected without any disturbance of vision.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijo.IJO_429_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5778558PMC
January 2018

Enzyme inhibitors in tuber crops and their thermal stability.

Plant Foods Hum Nutr 1995 Oct;48(3):247-57

Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum, India.

Tubers of Cassava (Manihot esculenta), yams (Dioscorea esculenta), aroids (Amorphophallus campanulatus, Colocasia esculenta, Xanthosoma sagittfolium) and Coleus (Solenostemon rotundifolius) were screened for inhibitory activities against amylase, trypsin and chymotrypsin. Coleus tuber possessed the highest anti-amylase activity, whereas Colocasia tuber was the most potent source of anti-tryptic and anti-chymotryptic activity. Xanthosoma tubers exhibited amylase inhibitory activity and Amorphophallus tubers antiprotease activity. Dioscorea esculenta had low levels of amylase and chymotrypsin inhibitors, while Cassava tubers were totally free of inhibitors. When tubers were processed by pressure cooking, there was significant reduction/complete elimination in inhibitory activity. Partial retention of inhibition was observed in the case of amylase inhibitor in Dioscorea, chymotrypsin inhibitor in Colocasia and trypsin inhibitor in Colocasia, Coleus and Amorphophallus. In vitro experiments on heat stability of the different inhibitors revealed almost similar pattern of inactivation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF01088446DOI Listing
October 1995