Publications by authors named "S N Hoehne"

17 Publications

The valence and the functions of autobiographical memories: Does intensity matter?

Conscious Cogn 2021 05 26;91:103119. Epub 2021 Mar 26.

Department of Developmental Psychology, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, 89081 Ulm, Germany.

Autobiographical memories serve psychosocial functions in daily life and the use of memories is related to their valence. In the present study, we examined whether functions are also related to the intensity of positive and negative memories. Our sample included 110 participants (57-89 years of age). Memories were prompted with 30 emotionally neutral cue words. Participants rated the emotional quality of each memory and indicated how frequently they had recalled it for self-continuity, directing behavior, social-bonding, and mood-enhancement. We used multilevel modeling to test whether individual differences in the use of memories can explain why individuals recall different numbers of positive and negative memories as well as memories high or low in intensity. Each function revealed its specific pattern regarding valence and intensity but also regarding within-person and between-person effects. Mood-enhancement showed the strongest relations, which points to the importance of considering emotion regulation as a function of autobiographical memory.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.concog.2021.103119DOI Listing
May 2021

The clinical practice of small animal CPR and compliance with RECOVER guidelines in Switzerland: an internet-based survey.

Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd 2020 12;162(12):755-770

Division of Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care, Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern.

Introduction: Objective: In 2012, the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER) published the first evidence-based small animal CPR guidelines. Even though a RECOVER-based CPR approach has been shown to improve patient outcomes, guideline awareness and compliance is necessary to see such benefits. Our study aimed to characterize Swiss small animal veterinary CPR practices and assess their compliance with RECOVER guidelines. Methods: A nationwide, internet-based survey was conducted, and invitations distributed via Swiss veterinary society mailing lists. Questions covered respondents' demographics, CPR preparedness, Basic Life Support (BLS) and Advanced Life Support (ALS) techniques, and awareness of RECOVER guidelines. Percentages of group total (95% confidence interval) were calculated. Results: One-hundred and fifty respondents were grouped by level of expertise into board-certified specialists (BCS, n = 19), veterinarians with additional post-graduate training (PGT, n = 27), and general practitioners with (GPE, n = 30), and without emergency duties (GPG, n = 74). Of BCS respondents, 58% (36-77%) were familiar with the RECOVER guidelines, compared to 8% (4-17%) of GPG. Large disparities in preparedness, BLS, and ALS techniques emerged among the levels of expertise. Incompliance with preparedness measures varied from 89% (69-98%) in BCS to 100% (95-100%) in GPG and was predominantly due to failure to attend regular CPR training. BLS compliance ranged from 26% (12-49%) in BCS to 5% (2-13%) in GPG, and incompliance was mostly characterized by targeting lower than recommended chest compression rates. ALS compliance varied from 21% (9-43%) in BCS to 0% (0-5%) in GPG and was compromised by limitations in the resuscitation environment such as lacking access to a defibrillator, monitoring equipment, and rescue drugs. Conclusion: Awareness of RECOVER guidelines in Switzerland is acceptable in specialists, but inadequate among general practitioners and CPR practices are largely not in agreement with RECOVER guidelines. An educational strategy is needed to improve Swiss small animal CPR knowledge and performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17236/sat00281DOI Listing
December 2020

[Small animal cardiopulmonary -resuscitation (CPR) in general practice].

Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd 2020 12;162(12):735-753

Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria 3030, Australia.

Introduction: Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) is the acute cessation of systemic perfusion and ventilation. It leads to a lack of tissue oxygen delivery and, if not addressed quickly, will inevitably cause death. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the only available treatment for CPA and several opportunities exist to improve the veterinary team's resuscitation approach and optimize small animal CPR patient outcomes. In 2012, the Reassessment Campaign on Veterinary Resuscitation (RECOVER) initiative generated evidence-based clinical guidelines to form the basis for training and practice of CPR in dogs and cats. When employing an evidence-based, standardized approach to small animal CPR, return of spontaneous circulation can be achieved in up to 58% of patients and up to 7% of dogs and 19% of cats can be discharged from the veterinary hospital alive. Survival for dogs and cats that suffer CPA is best in patients that suffer a peri-anesthetic arrest, so high quality CPR in the anesthesia patient population is of utmost importance and expected to be the most rewarding. To ensure the best possible outcomes for any patient suffering from CPA and undergoing CPR, a comprehensive resuscitation strategy is necessary, that includes preventive and preparedness measures, basic life support (chest compressions and ventilation), advanced life support (optimization of the patient status by targeted drug therapy, cardiac rhythm monitoring, and defibrillation), and post-cardiac arrest critical care. This article summarizes the most important RECOVER CPR guidelines for the small animal practitioner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17236/sat00280DOI Listing
December 2020

Role of Dual Oxidases in Ventilator-induced Lung Injury.

Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2021 02;64(2):208-215

University of California Lung Center, University of California, Davis, Davis, California.

Positive-pressure ventilation results in ventilator-induced lung injury, and few therapeutic modalities have been successful at limiting the degree of injury to the lungs. Understanding the primary drivers of ventilator-induced lung injury will aid in the development of specific treatments to ameliorate the progression of this syndrome. There are conflicting data for the role of neutrophils in acute respiratory distress syndrome pathogenesis. Here, we specifically examined the importance of neutrophils as a primary driver of ventilator-induced lung injury in a mouse model known to have impaired ability to recruit neutrophils in previous models of inflammation. We exposed and mice to low- or high-tidal volume ventilation with or without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers for 4 hours. Absolute neutrophils in BAL fluid were significantly reduced in mice compared with mice (6.7 cells/μl; 16.4 cells/μl;  = 0.003), consistent with our hypothesis that neutrophil translocation across the capillary endothelium is reduced in the absence of DUOX1 or DUOX2 in response to ventilator-induced lung injury. Reduced lung neutrophilia was not associated with a reduction in overall lung injury in this study, suggesting that neutrophils do not play an important role in early features of acute lung injury. Surprisingly, mice exhibited significant hypoxemia, as measured by the arterial oxygen tension/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio and arterial oxygen content, which was out of proportion with that seen in the mice (141, 257,  = 0.012). These findings suggest a role for dual oxidases to limit physiologic impairment during early ventilator-induced lung injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2020-0197OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7874397PMC
February 2021

Comparison of the effects of 7.2% hypertonic saline and 20% mannitol on electrolyte and acid-base variables in dogs with suspected intracranial hypertension.

J Vet Intern Med 2021 Jan 25;35(1):341-351. Epub 2020 Nov 25.

Division of Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care, Department of Clinical Veterinary Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Background: Hyperosmolar agents frequently are used to decrease intracranial pressure but their effects on electrolyte and acid-base variables have not been prospectively investigated.

Objectives: Compare duration and magnitude of changes in electrolyte and acid-base variables after hyperosmolar treatment.

Animals: Twenty-eight client-owned dogs with intracranial hypertension caused by various pathologies.

Methods: Prospective, randomized, nonblinded, experimental cohort study. Fifteen dogs received a single dose (4 mL/kg) of 7.2% hypertonic saline (HTS), 13 dogs received 20% mannitol (MAN) 1 g/kg IV. Electrolyte and acid-base variables were measured before (T ), and 5 (T ), 60 (T ), and 120 (T ) minutes after administration. Variables were compared between treatments and among time points within treatment groups.

Results: Mean plasma sodium and chloride concentrations were higher after HTS than MAN at T (158 vs 141 mEq/L; 126 vs 109 mEq/L) and significant differences were maintained at all time points. After HTS, plasma sodium and chloride concentrations remained increased from T at all time points. After MAN, plasma sodium and chloride concentrations decreased at T , but these changes were not maintained at T and T . Plasma potassium concentration was lower at T after HTS compared with T (3.6 vs 3.9 mEq/L) and compared to MAN (3.6 vs 4.1 mEq/L). At T and T , plasma ionized calcium concentration was lower after HTS than MAN (1.2 vs 1.3 mmol/L). No significant differences were found in acid-base variables between treatments.

Conclusions And Clinical Importance: At the administered dose, dogs receiving HTS showed sustained increases in plasma sodium and chloride concentrations, whereas dogs receiving MAN showed transient decreases. Future studies should assess the effects of multiple doses of hyperosmolar agents on electrolyte and acid-base variables.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvim.15973DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7848367PMC
January 2021
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