Publications by authors named "S Marie Harvey"

1,724 Publications

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Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Intensive Care Admissions in a Pregnant and Postpartum Population, Hawai'i, 2012-2017.

Public Health Rep 2021 Jun 7:333549211021146. Epub 2021 Jun 7.

3939 Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, University of Hawai'i John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI, USA.

Objective: Maternal morbidity and mortality is a global concern despite advances in medical care and technology and improved economic resources of nations worldwide. The primary objective of our study was to describe racial/ethnic disparities in severe maternal morbidity by using admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) as a marker. The secondary objective was to evaluate associations between patient characteristics, including obstetric outcomes, and severe maternal morbidity.

Methods: This retrospective cohort study used a large inpatient database to identify pregnancy and postpartum hospitalizations in Hawai'i from January 2012 through September 2017. We evaluated associations between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and race/ethnicity by using χ tests. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between race/ethnicity and ICU admission. We used a post hoc analysis to assess associations between ICU admission and obstetric outcomes by race/ethnicity.

Results: After adjustment, we found a significantly higher ICU admission rate among Asian (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.30; 95% CI, 1.04-1.62; = .02), Filipino (aOR = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.17-1.79; < .001), and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (aOR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.15-1.68; < .001) women compared with non-Hispanic White women. Multiple clinical characteristics and outcomes were associated with ICU admission, such as preexisting chronic conditions and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders.

Conclusion: We found that severe maternal morbidity represented by ICU admission is higher among Asian, Filipino, and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander women than among non-Hispanic White women in Hawai'i. Our findings reemphasize the need for health care providers to be vigilant in caring for members of racial/ethnic minority groups and managing their comorbidities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00333549211021146DOI Listing
June 2021

Hunger and Health: Taking a Formative Approach to Build a Health Intervention Focused on Nutrition and Physical Activity Needs as Perceived by Stakeholders.

Nutrients 2021 May 10;13(5). Epub 2021 May 10.

Department of Health, Sport and Exercise Sciences, School of Education and Human Sciences, Lawrence Campus, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA.

The intersections between hunger and health are beginning to gain traction. New interventions emphasize collaboration between the health and social service sectors. This study aimed to understand the nutrition and physical activity (PA) needs as perceived by food pantry stakeholders to inform a health intervention approach. The study used formative research incorporating mixed methods through surveying and semi-structured interviews with three food pantry stakeholder groups: Clients ( = 30), staff ( = 7), and volunteers ( = 10). Pantry client participants reported; high rates of both individual (60%, = 18) and household (43%, = 13) disease diagnosis; low consumption (0-1 servings) of fruits (67%, = 20) and vegetables (47%, = 14) per day; and low levels (0-120 min) of PA (67%, = 20) per week. Interviews identified five final convergent major themes across all three stakeholder groups including food and PA barriers, nutrition and PA literacy, health status and lifestyle, current pantry operations and adjustments, and suggestions for health intervention programming. High rates of chronic disease combined with low health literacy among pantry clients demonstrate the need to address health behaviors. Further research piloting the design and implementation of a comprehensive health behavior intervention program in the food pantry setting is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13051584DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8151779PMC
May 2021

Experiences of discrimination and endorsement of HIV/AIDS conspiracy beliefs: exploring difference among a sample of Latino, Black, and White young adults.

Ethn Health 2021 May 31:1-18. Epub 2021 May 31.

College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Monmouth, Oregon, USA.

Racial/ethnic discrimination and HIV/AIDS conspiracy beliefs may contribute to disparities in use and satisfaction with healthcare services. Previous studies that examined racial/ethnic experiences of everyday discrimination (EOD), health care discrimination (HCD), and HIV/AIDS conspiracy beliefs (HCB) focused primarily on African Americans with few studies focusing on Latinos. This study used data from in-person structured interviews with 450 Latino, Black, and White young adults from East Los Angeles, California. Multivariable models, adjusting for all demographic covariates, investigated if race/ethnicity and gender were associated with EOD and HCD and endorsing HCB, and if the associations between race/ethnicity and discriminations and HCB varied by gender. Blacks and Latinos reported more experiences of EOD and HCD in almost all forms and endorsed more HIV/AIDS conspiracy beliefs compared to Whites. Additionally, Black and Latino men reported stronger feelings of EOD than their female counterparts. More reports of experiences of HCD and endorsement of HCB beliefs were found for Blacks, Latinos, and participants with children compared to their counterparts. This study contributes to a growing understanding of how different racial/ethnic groups experience discrimination across various settings and everyday activities and their endorsement of HIV/AIDS conspiracy beliefs. The field of Public Health must address the problems of racism and discrimination similar to any other toxic pathogen. In so doing, Public Health becomes proactive in its efforts to mitigate the effects of racial discriminations on population health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13557858.2021.1932765DOI Listing
May 2021

Clinical trials site recruitment optimisation: Guidance from Clinical Trials: Impact and Quality.

Clin Trials 2021 May 27:17407745211015924. Epub 2021 May 27.

Orygen, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Background/aims: Participants are integral to the success of any clinical research study, yet participant recruitment into clinical trials poses ongoing and complex challenges. It is widely accepted and recognised that clinical trial sites often find it difficult to meet recruitment goals, both in terms of accrual targets and timelines. This can impact the validity of trials or cause major delays for research. There are very few frameworks available to clinical trial sites to improve recruitment. The GREET project (Guidance to Recruitment: Examining Experiences at clinical Trial sites) sought to identify barriers to recruitment and produce formal guidance to optimise recruitment outcomes.

Methods: Clinical Trials: Impact and Quality, a collaborative of sector stakeholders, convened a project team with comprehensive knowledge of the Australian clinical trials sector to undertake the GREET project. The project scope included exploration of recruitment issues at a site level across all phases of clinical trials and all types of trial sites. The scope excluded upstream issues such as protocol design and general public clinical trial awareness, participant retention and elements of recruitment outside a site's capacity to directly influence or control. The project team's extensive knowledge and experience conducting clinical trials in Australia was used to collaboratively identify a list of 24 key barriers and 12 enablers to site recruitment which formed the basis of the project. Key stakeholder groups were surveyed to challenge project team assumptions. A national and international environmental scan and literature review was conducted to identify best-practice recruitment solutions.

Results: A total of 343 people responded to a survey sent to sites, sponsors, and contract research organisations, and 162 people responded to a survey sent to consumers via consumer networks. The key barriers and enablers initially identified by the project team aligned with the key outcomes of the surveys, which in turn assisted in the development of best-practice recommendations in the form of a Clinical Trial Site Recruitment Guide. Recommendations were grouped into four key themes; conducting accurate study feasibility; proactive planning during start-up; selecting optimal recruitment methods; and participant involvement. Early intervention was identified as a key facilitator in maximising improved recruitment outcomes. The GREET Clinical Trial Site Recruitment Guide is publicly accessible on the Clinical Trials: Impact and Quality website.

Conclusion: Participant recruitment challenges experienced at a site level are widespread and varied, and there is no universal recruitment solution. However, this project identified that there are interventions and assessments that can be proactively implemented and selectively applied to facilitate improved recruitment outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/17407745211015924DOI Listing
May 2021

Prediction of Protein Complex Structure Using Surface-Induced Dissociation and Cryo-Electron Microscopy.

Anal Chem 2021 Jun 17;93(21):7596-7605. Epub 2021 May 17.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, 2114 Newman & Wolfrom Laboratory, 100 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States.

A variety of techniques involving the use of mass spectrometry (MS) have been developed to obtain structural information on proteins and protein complexes. One example of these techniques, surface-induced dissociation (SID), has been used to study the oligomeric state and connectivity of protein complexes. Recently, we demonstrated that appearance energies (AE) could be extracted from SID experiments and that they correlate with structural features of specific protein-protein interfaces. While SID AE provides some structural information, the AE data alone are not sufficient to determine the structures of the complexes. For this reason, we sought to supplement the data with computational modeling, through protein-protein docking. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the scoring of structures generated from protein-protein docking could be improved with the inclusion of SID data; however, this work relied on knowledge of the correct tertiary structure and only built full complexes for a few cases. Here, we performed docking using input structures that require less prior knowledge, using homology models, unbound crystal structures, and bound+perturbed crystal structures. Using flexible ensemble docking (to build primarily subcomplexes from an ensemble of backbone structures), the RMSD of all (15/15) predicted structures using the combined Rosetta, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and SID score was less than 4 Å, compared to only 7/15 without SID and cryo-EM. Symmetric docking (which used symmetry to build full complexes) resulted in predicted structures with RMSD less than 4 Å for 14/15 cases with experimental data, compared to only 5/15 without SID and cryo-EM. Finally, we also developed a confidence metric for which all (26/26) proteins flagged as high confidence were accurately predicted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.0c05468DOI Listing
June 2021