Publications by authors named "S J Moug"

99 Publications

Prehabilitation services for people diagnosed with cancer in Scotland - Current practice, barriers and challenges to implementation.

Surgeon 2021 Sep 14. Epub 2021 Sep 14.

Professor of Public Health Nutrition, Centre for Research Into Cancer Prevention and Screening, Level 7, Mailbox 7, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK. Electronic address:

Background: Prehabilitation is the practice of enhancing a patient's functional and psychological capacity before treatment commences. It is of interest in the cancer context because of the impact of treatments on quality of life and cancer survivorship. This work aims to document current practice, barriers and challenges to implementing prehabilitation to inform the development of a national framework.

Methods: A mixed-methods approach was applied: an on-line survey was sent to stakeholders in cancer care across Scotland, supplemented by in-depth interviews. Key domains explored were the perceived importance of prehabilitation, availability, delivery and content of services, outcome measures, referral processes and funding.

Findings: A total of 295 survey responses were obtained and 11 interviews completed. Perceived importance of prehabilitation was rated highly. There was uncertainty over the definition of prehabilitation and most respondents did not know if local services were available. Where services were described, a range of health professionals were involved, different outcome measures were utilised and frequency of referrals varied. Respondents highlighted short time frames between referral and treatment, concerns about patient engagement, the evidence base for action and funding priorities. Respondents also commented on which context a referral should be made and to whom, and the need for equity of service across the country.

Conclusions: The current work found clear evidence of the perceived importance of prehabilitation in cancer patients. However, issues and key gaps were identified within current services (including issues arising from COVID-19) which must be addressed to enable wide-spread development and implementation of equitable programmes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surge.2021.08.005DOI Listing
September 2021

Follow-up of small & diminutive colonic polyps - how to balance the risks in the COVID-19 era.

Colorectal Dis 2021 Sep 12. Epub 2021 Sep 12.

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a reduced colonoscopy capacity in the UK resulting in increased waiting times for investigation. To increase diagnostic capacity and reduce the risk of diagnostic delay, CT colonography (CTC) and colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) are increasingly being relied upon. Endoscopic assessment and treatment will be required for those patients with large colonic polyps or malignant tumours detected by CTC or CCE, provided they are fit enough to undergo further investigation. The management of patients with intermediate (6-9mm) and diminutive (<6mm) colonic polyps, reported by CTC and CCE, will increasingly be decided by clinicians. Published literature suggests the risk of progression to malignancy of intermediate or diminutive polyps over 3 years is low. Furthermore, the risk of intermediate or diminutive polyps harbouring malignancy is extremely low. The benefits, and timeline, for the removal of these polyps must be carefully considered for patients. We present a pragmatic approach to managing intermediate and diminutive polyps. We suggest delayed polypectomy (up to one year) for patients with intermediate polyps who are likely to benefit. For those patients with diminutive polyps, we advocate further surveillance only for younger patients where clinical concern exists. This meets the aspirations of Realistic Medicine, providing a risk-based approach for patients, while appropriately prioritising resources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/codi.15907DOI Listing
September 2021

Antibiotics as first-line alternative to appendicectomy in adult appendicitis: 90-day follow-up from a prospective, multicentre cohort study.

Br J Surg 2021 Sep 3. Epub 2021 Sep 3.

Colorectal Department, Royal Derby Hospital, Derby, UK.

Background: Uncomplicated acute appendicitis can be managed with non-operative (antibiotic) treatment, but laparoscopic appendicectomy remains the first-line management in the UK. During the COVID-19 pandemic the practice altered, with more patients offered antibiotics as treatment. A large-scale observational study was designed comparing operative and non-operative management of appendicitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate 90-day follow-up.

Methods: A prospective, cohort study at 97 sites in the UK and Republic of Ireland included adult patients with a clinical or radiological diagnosis of appendicitis that either had surgery or non-operative management. Propensity score matching was conducted using age, sex, BMI, frailty, co-morbidity, Adult Appendicitis Score and C-reactive protein. Outcomes were 90-day treatment failure in the non-operative group, and in the matched groups 30-day complications, length of hospital stay (LOS) and total healthcare costs associated with each treatment.

Results: A total of 3420 patients were recorded: 1402 (41 per cent) had initial antibiotic management and 2018 (59 per cent) had appendicectomy. At 90-day follow-up, antibiotics were successful in 80 per cent (1116) of cases. After propensity score matching (2444 patients), fewer overall complications (OR 0.36 (95 per cent c.i. 0.26 to 0.50)) and a shorter median LOS (2.5 versus 3 days, P < 0.001) were noted in the antibiotic management group. Accounting for interval appendicectomy rates, the mean total cost was €1034 lower per patient managed without surgery.

Conclusion: This study found that antibiotics is an alternative first-line treatment for adult acute appendicitis and can lead to cost reductions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjs/znab287DOI Listing
September 2021

Feasibility of a perioperative smartphone application in colorectal surgery.

Br J Surg 2021 Aug 18. Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Department of Surgery, Royal Alexandra Hospital, University of Glasgow, Paisley, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjs/znab143DOI Listing
August 2021

Healthcare professional preferences in the health and fitness assessment and optimization of older patients facing colorectal cancer surgery.

Colorectal Dis 2021 Sep 1;23(9):2331-2340. Epub 2021 Jul 1.

Department of Oncology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Aim: There are few age- and fitness-specific, evidence-based guidelines for colorectal cancer surgery. The uptake of different assessment and optimization strategies is variable. The aim of this study was to explore healthcare professional opinion about these issues using a mixed methods design.

Methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were undertaken with healthcare professionals from a single UK region involved in the treatment, assessment and optimization of colorectal surgery patients. Interviews were analysed using the framework approach. An online questionnaire survey was subsequently designed and disseminated to UK surgeons to quantitatively assess the importance of interview themes. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse questionnaire data.

Results: Thirty-seven healthcare professionals out of 42 approached (response rate 88%) were interviewed across five hospitals in the south Yorkshire region. Three broad themes were developed: attitudes towards treatment of the older patient, methods of assessment of suitability and optimization strategies. The questionnaire was completed by 103 out of an estimated 256 surgeons (estimated response rate 40.2%). There was a difference in opinion regarding the role of major surgery in older patients, particularly when there is coexisting dementia. Assessment was not standardized. Access to optimization strategies was limited, particularly in the emergency setting.

Conclusion: There is wide variation in the process of assessment and provision of optimization strategies in UK practice. Lack of evidence-based guidelines, cost and time constraints restrict the development of services and pathways. Differences in opinion between surgeons towards patients with frailty or dementia may account for some of the variation in colorectal cancer outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/codi.15758DOI Listing
September 2021
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