Publications by authors named "S Greene"

1,526 Publications

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Assessing LGBTQ+ stigma among healthcare professionals: An application of the health stigma and discrimination framework in a qualitative, community-based participatory research study.

J Health Psychol 2022 Aug;27(9):2181-2196

UT Health San Antonio, USA.

This qualitative, community-based participatory research (CBPR) study examines the occurrence of LGBTQ+ stigma in healthcare guided by the Health Stigma and Discrimination Framework. We conducted focus groups with healthcare professionals, analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Stigma drivers included knowledge deficits and transphobia. Facilitators were the binary organization of medical education and training, cisnormative system procedures, a lack of enforceable policy to reduce stigma, and workplace culture and norms. Stigma practices, such as prejudicial attitudes, gossip, and misgendering, primarily focused on transgender individuals. This study reinforces the need to reduce LGBTQ+ stigma in healthcare settings, with implications for multi-level interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/13591053211027652DOI Listing
August 2022

Performance of Current Risk Stratification Models for Predicting Mortality in Patients with Heart Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Eur J Prev Cardiol 2022 Aug 3. Epub 2022 Aug 3.

Department of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

Background: There are several risk scores designed to predict mortality in patients with heart failure (HF).

Aim: To assess performance of risk scores validated for mortality prediction in patients with acute HF (AHF) and chronic HF.

Methods: MEDLINE and Scopus were searched from January 2015 to January 2021 for studies which internally or externally validated risk models for predicting all-cause mortality in patients with AHF and chronic HF. Discrimination data were analyzed using C-statistics, and pooled using generic inverse-variance random-effects model.

Results: Nineteen studies (n = 494,156 patients; AHF:24,762; chronic HF mid-term mortality:62,000; chronic HF long-term mortality:452,097) and 11 risk scores were included. Overall, discrimination of risk scores was good across the three subgroups: AHF mortality (C-statistic:0.76, [0.68-0.83]), chronic HF mid-term mortality (1 year; C-statistic:0.74, [0.68-0.79]) and chronic HF long-term mortality (≥2 years; C-statistic:0.71, [0.69-0.73]). MEESSI-AHF (C-statistic:0.81, [0.80-0.83]) and MARKER-HF (C-statistic:0.85, [0.80-0.89]) had excellent discrimination for AHF and chronic HF mid-term mortality respectively, whereas MECKI had good discrimination (C-statistic:0.78, [0.73-0.83]) for chronic HF long-term mortality relative to other models. Overall, risk scores predicting short-term mortality in patients with AHF did not have evidence of poor calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow p > 0.05). However, risk models predicting mid-term and long-term mortality in patients with chronic HF varied in calibration performance.

Conclusions: Majority of recently validated risk scores showed good discrimination for mortality in patients with HF. MEESSI-AHF demonstrated excellent discrimination in patients with AHF, and MARKER-HF and MECKI displayed excellent discrimination in patients with chronic HF. However, modest reporting of calibration and lack of head-to-head comparisons in same populations warrant future studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurjpc/zwac148DOI Listing
August 2022

Search for Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Interactions of the Top Quark and Higgs Boson in Final States with Two Photons in Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt[s]=13  TeV.

Phys Rev Lett 2022 Jul;129(3):032001

Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen, Belgium.

Proton-proton interactions resulting in final states with two photons are studied in a search for the signature of flavor-changing neutral current interactions of top quarks (t) and Higgs bosons (H). The analysis is based on data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 137  fb^{-1}. No significant excess above the background prediction is observed. Upper limits on the branching fractions (B) of the top quark decaying to a Higgs boson and an up (u) or charm (c) quark are derived through a binned fit to the diphoton invariant mass spectrum. The observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper limits are found to be 0.019% (0.031%) for B(t→Hu) and 0.073% (0.051%) for B(t→Hc). These are the strictest upper limits yet determined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.129.032001DOI Listing
July 2022

Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter-2 Inhibitor Therapy During Anthracycline Treatment: Is There a Role for Cardioprotection?

JACC Heart Fail 2022 Aug 6;10(8):568-570. Epub 2022 Jul 6.

Division of Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, USA; Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchf.2022.04.014DOI Listing
August 2022

Demographic and Regional Trends of Heart Failure-Related Mortality in Young Adults in the US, 1999-2019.

JAMA Cardiol 2022 Jul 27. Epub 2022 Jul 27.

Division of Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.

Importance: There are limited data on mortality trends in young adults with heart failure (HF).

Objective: To study the trends in HF-related mortality among young adults.

Design, Setting, And Participants: This retrospective cohort analysis used mortality data of young adults aged 15 to 44 years with HF listed as a contributing or underlying cause of death in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-Ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research database from January 1999 to December 2019. Analysis took place in October 2021.

Exposures: Age 15 to 44 years with HF listed as a contributing or underlying cause of death.

Main Outcomes And Measures: HF-related age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMR) per 100 000 US population stratified by sex, race and ethnicity, and geographic areas.

Results: Between 1999 and 2019, a total of 61 729 HF-related deaths occurred in young adults. Of these, 38 629 (62.0%) were men and 23 460 (38.0%) were women, and 22 156 (35.9%) were Black, 6648 (10.8%) were Hispanic, and 30 145 (48.8%) were White. The overall AAMR per 100 000 persons for HF in young adults increased from 2.36 in 1999 to 3.16 in 2019. HF mortality increased in young men and women, with men having higher AAMRs throughout the study period. AAMR increased for all race and ethnicity groups, with Black adults having the highest AAMRs (6.41 in 1999 and 8.58 in 2019). AAMR for Hispanic adults and White adults increased from 1.62 to 2.04 and 1.83 to 2.45 over the same time period, respectively. Across most demographic and regional subgroups, HF-related mortality stayed stable or decreased between 1999 and 2012, followed by an increase between 2012 and 2019. There were significant regional differences in the burden of HF-related mortality, with states in the upper 90th percentile of HF-related mortality (Oklahoma, South Carolina, Louisiana, Arkansas, Alabama, and Mississippi) having a significantly higher mortality burden compared with those in the bottom tenth percentile.

Conclusions And Relevance: Following an initial period of stability, HF-related mortality in young adults increased from 2012 to 2019 in the United States. Black adults have a 3-fold higher AAMR compared with White adults, with significant geographic variation. Targeted health policy measures are needed to address the rising burden of HF in young adults, with a focus on prevention, early diagnosis, and reduction in disparities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamacardio.2022.2213DOI Listing
July 2022
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