Publications by authors named "S C Cutmore"

76 Publications

Gastropod first intermediate hosts for two species of Monorchiidae Odhner, 1911 (Trematoda): I can't believe it's not bivalves!

Int J Parasitol 2021 Jun 27. Epub 2021 Jun 27.

The University of Queensland, School of Biological Sciences, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia.

The trematode superfamily Monorchioidea comprises three families of teleost parasites: the Monorchiidae Odhner, 1911, Lissorchiidae Magath, 1917, and Deropristidae Cable & Hunninen, 1942. All presently known lissorchiid and deropristid life cycles have gastropods as first intermediate hosts, whereas those of monorchiids involve bivalves. Here, we report an unexpected intermediate host for monorchiids; two species of Hurleytrematoides Yamaguti, 1954 use gastropods as first intermediate hosts. Sporocysts and cercariae were found infecting two species of the family Vermetidae, highly specialised sessile gastropods that form calcareous tubes, from two locations off the coast of Queensland, Australia. These intramolluscan infections broadly corresponded morphologically to those of known monorchiids in that the cercariae have a spinous tegument, oral and ventral suckers, a simple tail and distinct eye-spots. Given the simplified morphology of intramolluscan infections, genetic data provided a definitive identification. ITS2 rDNA and cox1 mtDNA sequence data from the gastropod infections were identical to two species of Hurleytrematoides, parasites of butterflyfishes (Chaetodontidae); Hurleytrematoides loi McNamara & Cribb, 2011 from Moreton Bay (south-eastern Queensland) and Heron Island (southern Great Barrier Reef) and Hurleytrematoides morandi McNamara & Cribb, 2011 from Heron Island. Notably, species of Hurleytrematoides are positioned relatively basal in the phylogeny of the Monorchiidae and are a sister lineage to that of species known to infect bivalves. Thus, the most parsimonious evolutionary hypothesis to explain infection of gastropods by these monorchiids is that basal monorchiids (in our analyses, species of Cableia Sogandares-Bernal, 1959, Helicometroides Yamaguti, 1934 and Hurleytrematoides) will all prove to infect gastropods, suggesting a single host switching event into bivalves for more derived monorchiids (17 other genera in our phylogenetic analyses). A less parsimonious hypothesis is that the infection of vermetids will prove to be restricted to species of Hurleytrematoides, as an isolated secondary recolonisation of gastropods from a bivalve-infecting lineage. Regardless of how their use arose, vermetids represent a dramatic host jump relative to the rest of the Monorchiidae, one potentially enabled by their specialised feeding biology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2021.05.003DOI Listing
June 2021

n. g., n. sp., a new monorchiid trematode from the eastern Australian coast and its life cycle partially elucidated.

J Helminthol 2021 Jun 8;95:e30. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, QLD4072, Australia.

Of over 250 species of Monorchiidae Odhner, 1911, just four are known from gerreid fishes. Here, we report adult specimens of a new species infecting Gerres oyena (Forsskål) and Gerres subfasciatus Cuvier from off Heron Island and North Stradbroke Island, Queensland, Australia. The species is morphologically most similar to the concept of Lasiotocus Looss, 1907, which currently comprises eight species, in the possession of an unspined genital atrium, bipartite terminal organ, round oral sucker and unlobed ovary. However, phylogenetic analyses of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene region shows the species to be distantly related to the two sequenced species of Lasiotocus - Lasiotocus mulli (Stossich, 1883) Odhner, 1911 and Lasiotocus trachinoti Overstreet & Brown, 1970 - and that it clearly requires a distinct genus; thus, we propose Gerricola queenslandensis n. g., n. sp. Morphologically, G. queenslandensis n. g., n. sp. differs significantly from L. mulli and L. trachinoti only in the possession of distinctly longer caeca, which terminate in the post-testicular region, and in the absence of a distinct gap in the terminal organ spines. The remaining species of Lasiotocus possess caeca that also terminate in the post-testicular region, which might warrant their transfer to Gerricola n. g. However, doubt about their monophyly due to a combination of significant morphological variation, a lack of information on some features and infection of a wide range of hosts, lead us to retain these taxa as species of Lasiotocus until molecular sequence data are available to better inform their phylogenetic and taxonomic positions. Sporocysts and cercariae of G. queenslandensis n. g., n. sp. were found in a lucinid bivalve, Codakia paytenorum (Iredale), from Heron Island. Sexual adult and intramolluscan stages were genetically matched with the ITS2 ribosomal DNA and cox1 mitochondrial DNA regions. This is the second record of the Lucinidae as a first intermediate host for the Monorchiidae. Additionally, we report sporocysts and cercariae of another monorchiid infection in a tellinid bivalve, Jactellina clathrata (Deshayes), from Heron Island. Molecular sequence data for this species do not match any sequenced species and phylogenetic analyses do not suggest any generic position.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022149X21000213DOI Listing
June 2021

A new genus of Bucephalidae Poche, 1907 (Trematoda: Digenea) for three new species infecting the yellowtail pike, Sphyraena obtusata Cuvier (Sphyraenidae), from Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia.

Syst Parasitol 2020 10 13;97(5):455-476. Epub 2020 Aug 13.

School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, 4072, Australia.

Three new species of the family Bucephalidae Poche, 1907 (Trematoda: Digenea) are described from the yellowtail pike, Sphyraena obtusata Cuvier (Sphyraenidae), from Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. The three species are morphologically consistent with the present broad concept of the genus Bucephalus Baer, 1827, but significant phylogenetic and ecological differences relative to the type-species of Bucephalus require the proposal of a new genus. Aenigmatrema n. g. is proposed for A. undecimtentaculatum n. sp. (type-species), A. inopinatum n. sp. and A. grandiovum n. sp. In addition, based on morphological, ecological and biogeographical similarities, we recombine two existing species of Bucephalus as Aenigmatrema kaku (Yamaguti, 1970) n. comb. and Aenigmatrema sphyraenae (Yamaguti, 1952) n. comb. Although the three species described in this study are extremely morphologically similar, they can be differentiated from each other, and from A. kaku and A. sphyraenae, morphometrically on the basis of egg size, tentacle number and a combination of the caecum and vitelline field lengths. Complete ITS2 rDNA, partial 28S rDNA and partial cox1 mtDNA sequence data were generated for the three new species, which formed a well-supported clade in all 28S phylogenetic analyses. An expanded phylogenetic tree for the subfamily Bucephalinae Poche, 1907 is presented, demonstrating unresolved issues with the morphology-based taxonomy of the subfamily. The three largest genera, Bucephalus, Rhipidocotyle Diesing, 1858 and Prosorhynchoides Dollfus, 1929 remain extensively polyphyletic, indicating the need for significant further systematic revision.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11230-020-09931-7DOI Listing
October 2020

Retroporomonorchis pansho n. g., n. sp., an unusual monorchiid trematode exploiting an atypical host.

Syst Parasitol 2020 10 8;97(5):441-454. Epub 2020 Aug 8.

School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia.

The Monorchiidae Odhner, 1911 are well represented in tropical and subtropical marine fishes worldwide but rarely reported from the Lutjanidae, an important family of tropical fishes that prey mainly on demersal fishes, decapods and cephalopods. Here, we report the first monorchiid from a lutjanid in Australian waters, Retroporomonorchis pansho n. g., n. sp. in Lutjanus fulvus (Forster), off Lizard Island on the northern Great Barrier Reef. It is morphologically and phylogenetically distinct among known monorchiids, resolves within the Monorchiinae Odhner, 1911, and is characterised by a relatively large ventral sucker, a sinistral genital pore immediately posterior to the ventral sucker, unfilamented eggs, a single testis, and vitelline follicles restricted to the level of the gonads. We assessed all previous records of monorchiids from lutjanid fishes and found only one to be convincing, that of Infundiburictus overstreeti (Gupta & Gupta, 1990) Wee, Cutmore, Pérez-del-Olmo & Cribb, 2020 from Lutjanus monostigma (Cuvier) in the Bay of Bengal. Another, Monorcheides xishaensis Shen, 1985, from Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Forsskål) in the Paracel Islands, South China Sea, is here recognised as a cryptogonimid, and is synonymised with Siphoderina asiatica Gu & Shen, 1979. In the remaining reports, the identity of the host is either ambiguous or doubtful, or the identity of the worm is not supported with sufficient evidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11230-020-09926-4DOI Listing
October 2020

Pseudohurleytrema yolandae n. sp., the first monorchiid trematode reported from the Triacanthidae (Tetraodontiformes).

Syst Parasitol 2020 10 31;97(5):491-500. Epub 2020 Jul 31.

School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, St Lucia, QLD, 4072, Australia.

Prior to the present study, species of the trematode family Monorchiidae Odhner, 1911 had been reported from four of the ten families of tetraodontiform fishes: the Balistidae, Monacanthidae, Ostraciidae and Tetraodontidae. Here we report the first monorchiid from the family Triacanthidae, Pseudohurleytrema yolandae n. sp. infecting Tripodichthys angustifrons (Hollard), from Moreton Bay, Queensland, Australia. The species conforms well to the morphological concept of the subfamily Hurleytrematinae Yamaguti, 1958, and the genus Pseudohurleytrema Yamaguti, 1954, in the possession of filamented eggs, a bipartite terminal organ, and a unipartite seminal vesicle. Relative to the other three recognised species of Pseudohurleytrema, the present species is distinctive in the size of the testis and eggs, position of the ovary, and the form of the vitellarium and excretory vesicle. We consider Pseudohurleytrema magnum Kaikabad & Bilqees in Bilqees, 1991 as a species inquirenda. Sequence data for the 28S ribosomal RNA gene and cox1 mitochondrial gene were generated for P. yolandae, providing the first molecular data for the genus. Phylogenetic analysis showed that P. yolandae does not form a clade with the other three hurleytrematine genera for which there are molecular data (Helicometroides Yamaguti, 1934, Hurleytrematoides Yamaguti, 1953 and Provitellus Dove & Cribb, 1998), forming a poorly-supported clade with Proctotrema addisoni Searle, Cutmore & Cribb, 2014 within the clade of the subfamily Monorchiinae Odhner, 1911. The four hurleytrematine genera resolved as four distinct clades, indicating that the current subfamilial classification requires comprehensive revision.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11230-020-09924-6DOI Listing
October 2020
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