Publications by authors named "S B Klausen"

24 Publications

Chronic hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and metabolic syndrome are associated with risk of tendon injury.

Scand J Med Sci Sports 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, Department of Orthopedic Surgery M, Copenhagen University Hospital - Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg and Center for Healthy Aging, Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Tendon injury is a considerable problem affecting both physically active and sedentary people. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between markers for metabolic disorders (hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, and metabolic syndrome) and the risk of developing tendon injuries requiring referral to a hospital. The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective study of diabetic and non-diabetic individuals from the Danish general population with different physical activity levels. The cohort was followed for 3 years via national registers with respect to tendon injuries. Data from 5856 individuals (median age 62 years) were included. The overall incidence of tendon injury in both upper and lower extremities that required an out-patient or in-house visit to a hospital was ~5.7/1000 person years. Individuals with elevated HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin) even in the prediabetic range (HbA1c>5.7%) had a ~3 times higher risk of tendon injury in the lower extremities only, as compared to individuals with normal HbA1C levels. Hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol>5 mmol/L) increased risk of tendon injury in the upper extremities by ~1.5 times, and individuals with metabolic syndrome had ~2.5 times higher risk of tendon injury in both upper and lower extremities. In conclusion, these data demonstrate for the first time in a large cohort with different physical activity levels that the indicators for metabolic syndrome are a powerful systemic determinant of tendon injury, and two of its components, hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia, each independently make tendons susceptible for damage and injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.13984DOI Listing
May 2021

Mental movements: How long-distance walking influences reflection processes among middle-age and older adults.

Scand J Psychol 2021 Jun 14;62(3):365-373. Epub 2021 Mar 14.

Department of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

By providing a distinctive room for reflection, long-distance walks can help people similar to professional counselling. To understand reflection processes' influence on mental health, a framework focusing on personal transformations, specifically through the concept of liminality, can be used. Through nine semi-structured interviews with middle-aged and older long-distance walkers, this study answers the following question: How do middle-aged and older adults experience long-distance walking, and how do their experiences influence their reflective process? Four themes emerged during the analysis: (1) overcoming strain and achieving a sense of capability; (2) simplicity in obligations and having the time to pursue emotionally difficult experiences; (3) solitariness and reflection on oneself; and (4) calmness and embracing thoughts. These findings illustrate how going on long-distance walks may be similar to entering a liminal, or transformational, space. The findings show how long-distance walks can be helpful, or perhaps even therapeutic, in situations where personal transformation is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sjop.12721DOI Listing
June 2021

The effect of age when group housed and other management factors on playing and non-nutritive sucking behaviour in dairy calves: a cross sectional observational study.

Acta Vet Scand 2020 Nov 19;62(1):63. Epub 2020 Nov 19.

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Groennegaardsvej 8, 1870, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate if calves' play behaviour and non-nutritive sucking behaviour, as indirect measures of welfare status, are associated with the age of the calf when group housed, age when observed, age difference within the group, pen size, milk feeding system, current or previous sicknesses, access to dry teat, indoor/outdoor rearing, sex, organic/conventional farm, group size and regrouping events. An observational study was conducted on 176 Danish dairy calves in the age range of 1-12 weeks, on both conventional (n = 17) and organic (n = 5) farms. All calves had been group housed before 8 weeks of age and had spent various periods of time with the dam and/or individually housed before being group housed. Behaviour was recorded continuously by filming each individual calf over a period of 30 min.

Results: The calf's age when group housed for the first time was not found to be significantly associated with duration of either play behaviour (P = 0.55) or non-nutritive sucking behaviour (P = 0.44). It was found that calves had significantly reduced odds of playing for longer than the mean play duration (5.5 s) for each day of their lives (OR = 0.97, P = 0.003). Also, they had reduced odds of performing non-nutritive sucking behaviour for longer than the mean non-nutritive sucking duration (145.5 s) when milk was allocated by drinker buckets fitted with a teat compared to by bowl or trough (OR = 0.06, P = 0.02).

Conclusion: No significant associations were found between calves' age when group housed for the first time and play and non-nutritive sucking behaviour. It was found that calves' play behaviour decreased with increasing age, and that non-nutritive sucking behaviour decreased when milk was allocated with a teat compared to no teat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13028-020-00562-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7678188PMC
November 2020

Management Recommendations for Merkel Cell Carcinoma-A Danish Perspective.

Cancers (Basel) 2020 Feb 28;12(3). Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Plastic Surgery, Herlev & Gentofte Hospital, Department of Clinical Medicine, Copenhagen University, 2730 Herlev, Denmark.

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare malignant neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin with a poor prognosis and an apparent increase in incidence. Due to its rarity, evidence-based guidelines are limited, and there is a lack of awareness among clinicians. This review constitutes the consensus management recommendations developed by the Danish MCC expert group and is based on a systematic literature search. Patients with localized disease are recommended surgical excision and adjuvant radiotherapy to the primary site; however, this may be omitted in patients with MCC with low risk features. Patients with regional lymph node involvement are recommended complete lymph node removal and adjuvant radiotherapy in case of extracapsular disease. Metastatic disease was traditionally treated with chemotherapy, however, recent clinical trials with immune therapy have been promising. Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the programmed cell death protein 1(PD-1)/programmed death-ligand 1(PD-L1) axis should therefore be strongly considered as first-line treatment for fit patients. A 5-year follow-up period is recommended involving clinical exam every 3 months for 2 years and every 6 months for the following 3 years and PET-CT one to two times a year or if clinically indicated. These national recommendations are intended to offer uniform patient treatment and hopefully improve prognosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers12030554DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7139291PMC
February 2020

Nonpharmacological Interventions Addressing Pain, Sleep, and Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Primary Headache: A Systematic Review.

J Pain Res 2019 23;12:3437-3459. Epub 2019 Dec 23.

Open Patient Data Explorative Network (OPEN), University of Southern Denmark (SDU), Odense, Denmark.

Purpose: Children and adolescents with primary headache are at risk of persistent somatic symptoms and reduced quality of life (Qol) due to pain and pain-related behaviors, such as avoiding school and activities. Sleep is essential to health, and children and adolescents with primary headaches have more sleep complaints than do healthy controls. A treatment approach that addresses multifactorial causes is likely important. Nonpharmacological interventions seem promising. However, knowledge about effective strategies is limited. The objective of this review is to assess the effect of nonpharmacological interventions in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) among children and adolescents with primary headache in order to identify useful strategies.

Patients And Methods: Outcome measures are pain, sleep, Qol, and coping versus no intervention or control intervention. Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched for eligible trials. ClinicalTrials.gov. was searched for ongoing trials. Initial searches yielded 2588 publications. After initial screening and subsequent full-text review and quality assessment, 13 RCTs reported in 15 articles were selected for review. All reviewers independently assessed study quality using the CONSORT criteria for nonpharmacological interventions.

Results: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), including education on pain-related topics, sleep, coping, and stress management, is an effective strategy for reducing headache and pain within groups over time. Fifteen studies assessed pain, 3 studies assessed sleep, 6 studies assessed Qol, and 11 studies assessed coping.

Conclusion: Strategies identified as useful were parts of CBT interventions. However, it was not possible to identify a single effective intervention addressing pain, sleep, Qol, and coping in children and adolescents with headache, primarily because sleep was infrequently addressed. Various aspects of Qol and coping strategies were assessed, rendering comparison difficult. Strategies for future interventions should include descriptions of theory-driven CBT interventions, depending on clinical setting and based on local resources, to promote a solid evidence base for nonpharmacological interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S216807DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6939407PMC
December 2019