Publications by authors named "Sławomir Mroczkowski"

5 Publications

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Effects of Intronic SNPs in the Myostatin Gene on Growth and Carcass Traits in Colored Polish Merino Sheep.

Genes (Basel) 2019 12 18;11(1). Epub 2019 Dec 18.

Department of Animal Biotechnology and Genetics, UTP University of Science and Technology, Mazowiecka 28 St., 85-084 Bydgoszcz, Poland.

Myostatin acts as a negative regulator of muscle growth; therefore, its role is important with regard to animal growth and meat production. This study was undertaken with the objective to detect polymorphisms in the first intron and c.*1232 position of the gene and to analyze effects of the detected alleles/genotypes on growth and carcass traits in Colored Polish Merino sheep. In total, 23 traits were analyzed, i.e., seven describing lamb growth and 16 carcass traits. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the first intron and the c.*1232 position were identified using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods, respectively. The MIXED procedure of the SAS software package was used to analyze allelic and genotypic effects of the gene on growth and carcass traits. Polymorphisms were only detected in the first intron of the gene. All investigated sheep were monomorphic G in the c.*1232 position. The genotype was found to have significant effect on body weight at 2nd day of life (BW2) and loin and fore shank weights. Significant allelic effects were detected with respect to BW2, scrag, leg, fore, and hind shank weights. These results suggest that polymorphisms in the first intron of the gene are relevant with respect to several carcass traits and BW2 in Colored Polish Merino sheep.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes11010002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7016813PMC
December 2019

Examination of Growth Hormone (GH) Gene Polymorphism and its Association with Body Weight and Selected Body Dimensions in Ducks.

Folia Biol (Krakow) 2015 ;63(1):43-50

The main objective of the study was to assess the polymorphism in intron 2 of the GH gene and its association with some morphological traits (body weight--BW, length of trunk with neck--LTN, length of trunk--LT, chest girth--CG, length of breast bone--LBB, length of shank--LS). Polymorphism in intron 2 of the GH gene was evaluated for four duck populations (Pekin ducks AF51, Muscovy ducks from a CK and CRAMMLCFF mother and Mulard ducks). Genetic polymorphism was determined with the PCR-RFLP method using the BsmFI restriction enzyme. In the studied duck sample two alleles (GH(C) and GH(T)) and three genotypes (GH/TT, GH/CT, GH/CC) were found at locus GH/BsmFI. In both groups of Muscovies and in Mulards the dominant allele was GH(T). On the contrary in Pekin ducks AF51, the frequency of both alleles was found to be similar. The most frequent genotype in the examined ducks was GH/TT. In Pekin ducks AF51 three genotypes were observed, while in Mulard ducks and in male Muscovy ducks from a mother marked as CK, two genotypes (GH/TT and GH/CT) were identified. Muscovy duck females from a CK mother and all males and females of Muscovy duck from a CRAMMLCFF mother were monomorphic with only the GH/TTgenotype detected. The results showed that males of Pekin duck AF51 with the GH/TT genotype were characterized by higher (P < 0.01) BW value than those with the GH/CC and GH/CTgenotype. In females of Pekin ducks AF51, this same trend was observed; individuals with GH/TT genotype were superior (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) to birds with two other detected genotypes in respect to BW, CG, LBB and LS. In the case of Mulards, ducks with the GH/TT genotype were distinguished by higher values of all evaluated traits compared to ducks with GH/CT and GH/CC genotypes, however most of the recorded differences were not significant. The only trait markedly impacted (P < 0.05) by the polymorphism of the GH gene intron 2 was the LS value in males.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3409/fb63_1.43DOI Listing
July 2015

Sex ratio of White Stork Ciconia ciconia in different environments of Poland.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2015 Sep 5;22(17):13194-203. Epub 2015 May 5.

Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Department of Ecology and Environmental Protection, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Skłodowska-Curie St. 9, 85-094, Bydgoszcz, Poland,

The aim of this study was to analyze the variation in sex ratio of White Stork Ciconia ciconia chicks from differentiated Poland environments. We took under a consideration the impact of Cd and Pb for establish differences among sex ratio in chicks. We also study multiplex PCR employment for establish gender considerations. We collected blood samples via venipuncture of brachial vein of chicks during 2006-2008 breeding seasons at the Odra meadows (SW-Poland; control), which were compared with those from suburbs (SW-Poland), and from copper smelter (S-Poland; polluted) and from swamps near Baltic Sea. We found differences among sex ratio in White Stork chicks from types of environment. Male participation in sex structure is importantly higher in each type of environment excluded suburban areas. Differences in White Stork sex ratio according to the degree of environmental degradation expressed by Cd and Pb and sex-environment-metal interactions testify about the impact of these metals upon sex ratios in storks. Simultaneously, as a result of multiplex PCR, 18S ribosome gene, which served as internal control of PCR, was amplified in male and female storks. It means that it is possible to use primers designed for chicken in order to replicate this fragment of genome in White Stork. Moreover, the use of Oriental White Stork Ciconia boyciana W- chromosome specific primers makes it possible to determine the sex of C. ciconia chicks. Many factors make sex ratio of White Stork changes in subsequent breeding seasons, which depend significantly on specific environmental parameters that shape individual detailed defense mechanisms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-015-4250-zDOI Listing
September 2015

Prolactin (PRL) and prolactin receptor (PRLR) genes and their role in poultry production traits.

Folia Biol (Krakow) 2014 ;62(1):1-8

Prolactin (PRL), secreted from the anterior pituitary, plays extensive roles in osmoregulation, corpus luteum formation, mammogenesis, lactogenesis, lactopoiesis, and production of crop milk. In birds, prolactin (PRL) is generally accepted as crucial to the onset and maintenance of broodiness. All the actions of prolactin (PRL) hormone are mediated by its receptor (PRLR), which plays an important role in the PRL signal transduction cascade. It has been well established that the PRL gene is closely associated to the onset and maintenance of broody behavior, and could be a genetic marker in breeding against broodiness in chickens. Meanwhile, the prolactin receptor (PRLR) gene is regarded as a candidate genetic marker for reproductive traits. PRLR is also an important regulator gene for cell growth and differentiation. The identified polymorphism of this gene is mainly viewed in terms of egg production traits. Due to different biological activities attributed to PRL and PRLR, they can be used as major candidate genes in molecular animal breeding programs. Characterization of PRL and PRLR genes helps to elucidate their roles in birds and provides insights into the regulatory mechanisms of PRL and PRLR expression conserved in birds and mammals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3409/fb62_1.1DOI Listing
May 2014

Blood chemistry in white stork Ciconia ciconia chicks varies by sex and age.

Comp Biochem Physiol B Biochem Mol Biol 2010 Jun 15;156(2):144-7. Epub 2010 Mar 15.

Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Zielona Góra, Prof. Z. Szafrana St. 1, PL 65-516 Zielona Góra, Poland.

Little is known on how blood biochemistry differs among avian chicks, especially in sexually monomorphic species. In this study we sampled blood chemistry of 342 white stork Ciconia ciconia chicks from nests in western Poland during four years (2005-2008). Special attention was paid to the effect of chick age and sex on blood biochemistry. Since white stork is a monomorphic species, the sex of chicks was established by a molecular technique. Nine blood biochemical parameters were studied: total protein concentration, urea, uric acid, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). There were sexual differences in total protein, uric acid, cholesterol, HDL and AST. However, total protein and uric acid only differed significantly between sexes if an age effect was included as a covariate in the analysis. Triglycerides decreased significantly, and AST, increased significantly with chick age. We confirm that blood biochemistry varies with chick age, but we also found significant differences between the sexes. Therefore, to understand changes in blood parameters, and to establish reference ranges useful in captive rearing of this endangered species, establishing gender may be important, even in very young individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpb.2010.03.003DOI Listing
June 2010