Publications by authors named "Séverine Audebert-Bellanger"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Disruption of RFX family transcription factors causes autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, intellectual disability, and dysregulated behavior.

Genet Med 2021 Mar 3. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

Division of Genetics and Genomics, Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Purpose: We describe a novel neurobehavioral phenotype of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disability, and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) associated with de novo or inherited deleterious variants in members of the RFX family of genes. RFX genes are evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that act as master regulators of central nervous system development and ciliogenesis.

Methods: We assembled a cohort of 38 individuals (from 33 unrelated families) with de novo variants in RFX3, RFX4, and RFX7. We describe their common clinical phenotypes and present bioinformatic analyses of expression patterns and downstream targets of these genes as they relate to other neurodevelopmental risk genes.

Results: These individuals share neurobehavioral features including ASD, intellectual disability, and/or ADHD; other frequent features include hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli and sleep problems. RFX3, RFX4, and RFX7 are strongly expressed in developing and adult human brain, and X-box binding motifs as well as RFX ChIP-seq peaks are enriched in the cis-regulatory regions of known ASD risk genes.

Conclusion: These results establish a likely role of deleterious variation in RFX3, RFX4, and RFX7 in cases of monogenic intellectual disability, ADHD and ASD, and position these genes as potentially critical transcriptional regulators of neurobiological pathways associated with neurodevelopmental disease pathogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-021-01114-zDOI Listing
March 2021

Gene- and pathway-level analyses of iCOGS variants highlight novel signaling pathways underlying familial breast cancer susceptibility.

Int J Cancer 2021 Apr 9;148(8):1895-1909. Epub 2021 Jan 9.

Inserm, U900, Institut Curie, Paris, France.

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in over 180 loci have been associated with breast cancer (BC) through genome-wide association studies involving mostly unselected population-based case-control series. Some of them modify BC risk of women carrying a BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation and may also explain BC risk variability in BC-prone families with no BRCA1/2 mutation. Here, we assessed the contribution of SNPs of the iCOGS array in GENESIS consisting of BC cases with no BRCA1/2 mutation and a sister with BC, and population controls. Genotyping data were available for 1281 index cases, 731 sisters with BC, 457 unaffected sisters and 1272 controls. In addition to the standard SNP-level analysis using index cases and controls, we performed pedigree-based association tests to capture transmission information in the sibships. We also performed gene- and pathway-level analyses to maximize the power to detect associations with lower-frequency SNPs or those with modest effect sizes. While SNP-level analyses identified 18 loci, gene-level analyses identified 112 genes. Furthermore, 31 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and 7 Atlas of Cancer Signaling Network pathways were highlighted (false discovery rate of 5%). Using results from the "index case-control" analysis, we built pathway-derived polygenic risk scores (PRS) and assessed their performance in the population-based CECILE study and in a data set composed of GENESIS-affected sisters and CECILE controls. Although these PRS had poor predictive value in the general population, they performed better than a PRS built using our SNP-level findings, and we found that the joint effect of family history and PRS needs to be considered in risk prediction models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33457DOI Listing
April 2021

Calibration of Pathogenicity Due to Variant-Induced Leaky Splicing Defects by Using Exon 3 as a Model System.

Cancer Res 2020 09 8;80(17):3593-3605. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

Inserm U1245, UNIROUEN, Normandie University, Normandy Centre for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Rouen, France.

is a clinically actionable gene implicated in breast and ovarian cancer predisposition that has become a high priority target for improving the classification of variants of unknown significance (VUS). Among all VUS, those causing partial/leaky splicing defects are the most challenging to classify because the minimal level of full-length (FL) transcripts required for normal function remains to be established. Here, we explored exon 3 (e3) as a model for calibrating variant-induced spliceogenicity and estimating thresholds for haploinsufficiency. predictions, minigene splicing assays, patients' RNA analyses, a mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) complementation assay and retrieval of patient-related information were combined to determine the minimal requirement of FL transcripts. Of 100 e3 variants tested in the minigene assay, 64 were found to be spliceogenic, causing mild to severe RNA defects. Splicing defects were also confirmed in patients' RNA when available. Analysis of a neutral leaky variant (c.231T>G) showed that a reduction of approximately 60% of FL transcripts from a mutant allele does not cause any increase in cancer risk. Moreover, data obtained from mESCs suggest that variants causing a decline in FL with approximately 30% of wild-type are not pathogenic, given that mESCs are fully viable and resistant to DNA-damaging agents in those conditions. In contrast, mESCs producing lower relative amounts of FL exhibited either null or hypomorphic phenotypes. Overall, our findings are likely to have broader implications on the interpretation of variants affecting the splicing pattern of other essential exons. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate that tumor suppressor function tolerates substantial reduction in full-length transcripts, helping to determine the pathogenicity of leaky splicing variants, some of which may not increase cancer risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-20-0895DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7484206PMC
September 2020

Missense Variants in the Histone Acetyltransferase Complex Component Gene TRRAP Cause Autism and Syndromic Intellectual Disability.

Authors:
Benjamin Cogné Sophie Ehresmann Eliane Beauregard-Lacroix Justine Rousseau Thomas Besnard Thomas Garcia Slavé Petrovski Shiri Avni Kirsty McWalter Patrick R Blackburn Stephan J Sanders Kévin Uguen Jacqueline Harris Julie S Cohen Moira Blyth Anna Lehman Jonathan Berg Mindy H Li Usha Kini Shelagh Joss Charlotte von der Lippe Christopher T Gordon Jennifer B Humberson Laurie Robak Daryl A Scott Vernon R Sutton Cara M Skraban Jennifer J Johnston Annapurna Poduri Magnus Nordenskjöld Vandana Shashi Erica H Gerkes Ernie M H F Bongers Christian Gilissen Yuri A Zarate Malin Kvarnung Kevin P Lally Peggy A Kulch Brina Daniels Andres Hernandez-Garcia Nicholas Stong Julie McGaughran Kyle Retterer Kristian Tveten Jennifer Sullivan Madeleine R Geisheker Asbjorg Stray-Pedersen Jennifer M Tarpinian Eric W Klee Julie C Sapp Jacob Zyskind Øystein L Holla Emma Bedoukian Francesca Filippini Anne Guimier Arnaud Picard Øyvind L Busk Jaya Punetha Rolph Pfundt Anna Lindstrand Ann Nordgren Fayth Kalb Megha Desai Ashley Harmon Ebanks Shalini N Jhangiani Tammie Dewan Zeynep H Coban Akdemir Aida Telegrafi Elaine H Zackai Amber Begtrup Xiaofei Song Annick Toutain Ingrid M Wentzensen Sylvie Odent Dominique Bonneau Xénia Latypova Wallid Deb Sylvia Redon Frédéric Bilan Marine Legendre Caitlin Troyer Kerri Whitlock Oana Caluseriu Marine I Murphree Pavel N Pichurin Katherine Agre Ralitza Gavrilova Tuula Rinne Meredith Park Catherine Shain Erin L Heinzen Rui Xiao Jeanne Amiel Stanislas Lyonnet Bertrand Isidor Leslie G Biesecker Dan Lowenstein Jennifer E Posey Anne-Sophie Denommé-Pichon Claude Férec Xiang-Jiao Yang Jill A Rosenfeld Brigitte Gilbert-Dussardier Séverine Audebert-Bellanger Richard Redon Holly A F Stessman Christoffer Nellaker Yaping Yang James R Lupski David B Goldstein Evan E Eichler Francois Bolduc Stéphane Bézieau Sébastien Küry Philippe M Campeau

Am J Hum Genet 2019 03 28;104(3):530-541. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine Research Centre, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T1J4, Canada. Electronic address:

Acetylation of the lysine residues in histones and other DNA-binding proteins plays a major role in regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. This process is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs/KATs) found in multiprotein complexes that are recruited to chromatin by the scaffolding subunit transformation/transcription domain-associated protein (TRRAP). TRRAP is evolutionarily conserved and is among the top five genes intolerant to missense variation. Through an international collaboration, 17 distinct de novo or apparently de novo variants were identified in TRRAP in 24 individuals. A strong genotype-phenotype correlation was observed with two distinct clinical spectra. The first is a complex, multi-systemic syndrome associated with various malformations of the brain, heart, kidneys, and genitourinary system and characterized by a wide range of intellectual functioning; a number of affected individuals have intellectual disability (ID) and markedly impaired basic life functions. Individuals with this phenotype had missense variants clustering around the c.3127G>A p.(Ala1043Thr) variant identified in five individuals. The second spectrum manifested with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and/or ID and epilepsy. Facial dysmorphism was seen in both groups and included upslanted palpebral fissures, epicanthus, telecanthus, a wide nasal bridge and ridge, a broad and smooth philtrum, and a thin upper lip. RNA sequencing analysis of skin fibroblasts derived from affected individuals skin fibroblasts showed significant changes in the expression of several genes implicated in neuronal function and ion transport. Thus, we describe here the clinical spectrum associated with TRRAP pathogenic missense variants, and we suggest a genotype-phenotype correlation useful for clinical evaluation of the pathogenicity of the variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.01.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407527PMC
March 2019

Familial breast cancer and DNA repair genes: Insights into known and novel susceptibility genes from the GENESIS study, and implications for multigene panel testing.

Int J Cancer 2019 04 13;144(8):1962-1974. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Inserm, Paris, France.

Pathogenic variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 only explain the underlying genetic cause of about 10% of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families. Because of cost-effectiveness, multigene panel testing is often performed even if the clinical utility of testing most of the genes remains questionable. The purpose of our study was to assess the contribution of rare, deleterious-predicted variants in DNA repair genes in familial breast cancer (BC) in a well-characterized and homogeneous population. We analyzed 113 DNA repair genes selected from either an exome sequencing or a candidate gene approach in the GENESIS study, which includes familial BC cases with no BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and having a sister with BC (N = 1,207), and general population controls (N = 1,199). Sequencing data were filtered for rare loss-of-function variants (LoF) and likely deleterious missense variants (MV). We confirmed associations between LoF and MV in PALB2, ATM and CHEK2 and BC occurrence. We also identified for the first time associations between FANCI, MAST1, POLH and RTEL1 and BC susceptibility. Unlike other associated genes, carriers of an ATM LoF had a significantly higher risk of developing BC than carriers of an ATM MV (OR = 17.4 vs. OR = 1.6; p = 0.002). Hence, our approach allowed us to specify BC relative risks associated with deleterious-predicted variants in PALB2, ATM and CHEK2 and to add MAST1, POLH, RTEL1 and FANCI to the list of DNA repair genes possibly involved in BC susceptibility. We also highlight that different types of variants within the same gene can lead to different risk estimates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31921DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6587727PMC
April 2019

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Patients and Relatives Following a Diagnosis of De novo Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

Acta Derm Venereol 2018 Feb;98(2):291-293

Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Brest, CHU Morvan Brest, 2 avenue Foch, FR-29200 Brest, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-2813DOI Listing
February 2018

Sex chromosome aneuploidies and copy-number variants: a further explanation for neurodevelopmental prognosis variability?

Eur J Hum Genet 2017 08 14;25(8):930-934. Epub 2017 Jun 14.

Service de Génétique Médicale, CHU Nantes, Nantes, France.

Sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCA) is a group of conditions in which individuals have an abnormal number of sex chromosomes. SCA, such as Klinefelter's syndrome, XYY syndrome, and Triple X syndrome are associated with a large range of neurological outcome. Another genetic event such as another cytogenetic abnormality may explain a part of this variable expressivity. In this study, we have recruited fourteen patients with intellectual disability or developmental delay carrying SCA associated with a copy-number variant (CNV). In our cohort (four patients 47,XXY, four patients 47,XXX, and six patients 47,XYY), seven patients were carrying a pathogenic CNV, two a likely pathogenic CNV and five a variant of uncertain significance. Our analysis suggests that CNV might be considered as an additional independent genetic factor for intellectual disability and developmental delay for patients with SCA and neurodevelopmental disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ejhg.2017.93DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5567159PMC
August 2017

Type 0 Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Further Delineation of Prenatal and Postnatal Features in 16 Patients.

J Neuromuscul Dis 2016 11;3(4):487-495

Department of Genetics, Normandy Center for Medical Genomics and Personalized Medicine, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France.

Background: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by homozygous inactivation of the SMN1 gene. The SMN2 copy number modulates the severity of SMA. The 0SMN1/1SMN2 genotype, the most severe genotype compatible with life, is expected to be associated with the most severe form of the disease, called type 0 SMA, defined by prenatal onset.

Objective: The aim of the study was to review clinical features and prenatal manifestations in this rare SMA subtype.

Methods: SMA patients with the 0SMN1/1SMN2 genotype were retrospectively collected using the UMD-SMN1 France database.

Results: Data from 16 patients were reviewed. These 16 patients displayed type 0 SMA. At birth, a vast majority had profound hypotonia, severe muscle weakness, severe respiratory distress, and cranial nerves involvement (inability to suck/swallow, facial muscles weakness). They showed characteristics of fetal akinesia deformation sequence and congenital heart defects. Recurrent episodes of bradycardia were observed. Death occurred within the first month. At prenatal stage, decreased fetal movements were frequently reported, mostly only by mothers, in late stages of pregnancy; increased nuchal translucency was reported in about half of the cases; congenital heart defects, abnormal amniotic fluid volume, or joint contractures were occasionally reported.

Conclusion: Despite a prenatal onset attested by severity at birth and signs of fetal akinesia deformation sequence, prenatal manifestations of type 0 SMA are not specific and not constant. As illustrated by the frequent association with congenital heart defects, type 0 SMA physiopathology is not restricted to motor neuron, highlighting that SMN function is critical for organogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JND-160177DOI Listing
November 2016

GENESIS: a French national resource to study the missing heritability of breast cancer.

BMC Cancer 2016 Jan 12;16:13. Epub 2016 Jan 12.

Inserm, U900, Paris, France.

Background: Less than 20% of familial breast cancer patients who undergo genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 carry a pathogenic mutation in one of these two genes. The GENESIS (GENE SISter) study was designed to identify new breast cancer susceptibility genes in women attending cancer genetics clinics and with no BRCA1/2 mutation.

Methods: The study involved the French national network of family cancer clinics. It was based on enrichment in genetic factors of the recruited population through case selection relying on familial criteria, but also on the consideration of environmental factors and endophenotypes like mammary density or tumor characteristics to assess potential genetic heterogeneity. One of the initial aims of GENESIS was to recruit affected sibpairs. Siblings were eligible when index cases and at least one affected sister were diagnosed with infiltrating mammary or ductal adenocarcinoma, with no BRCA1/2 mutation. In addition, unrelated controls and unaffected sisters were recruited. The enrolment of patients, their relatives and their controls, the collection of the clinical, epidemiological, familial and biological data were centralized by a coordinating center.

Results: Inclusion of participants started in February 2007 and ended in December 2013. A total of 1721 index cases, 826 affected sisters, 599 unaffected sisters and 1419 controls were included. 98% of participants completed the epidemiological questionnaire, 97% provided a blood sample, and 76% were able to provide mammograms. Index cases were on average 59 years old at inclusion, were born in 1950, and were 49.7 years of age at breast cancer diagnosis. The mean age at diagnosis of affected sisters was slightly higher (51.4 years). The representativeness of the control group was verified.

Conclusions: The size of the study, the availability of biological specimens and the clinical data collection together with the detailed and complete epidemiological questionnaire make this a unique national resource for investigation of the missing heritability of breast cancer, by taking into account environmental and life style factors and stratifying data on endophenotypes to decrease genetic heterogeneity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-015-2028-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711059PMC
January 2016

Clinical Characteristics of Pruritus in Neurofibromatosis 1.

Acta Derm Venereol 2016 Mar;96(3):398-9

Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Brest , Brest, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-2241DOI Listing
March 2016

Mutations of the Imprinted CDKN1C Gene as a Cause of the Overgrowth Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: Clinical Spectrum and Functional Characterization.

Hum Mutat 2015 Sep 6;36(9):894-902. Epub 2015 Aug 6.

INSERM, UMR_S 938, Centre de recherche Saint-Antoine, F-75012, Paris, France.

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an imprinting disorder associating macroglossia, abdominal wall defects, visceromegaly, and a high risk of childhood tumor. Molecular anomalies are mostly epigenetic; however, mutations of CDKN1C are implicated in 8% of cases, including both sporadic and familial forms. We aimed to describe the phenotype of BWS patients with CDKN1C mutations and develop a functional test for CDKN1C mutations. For each propositus, we sequenced the three exons and intron-exon boundaries of CDKN1C in patients presenting a BWS phenotype, including abdominal wall defects, without 11p15 methylation defects. We developed a functional test based on flow cytometry. We identified 37 mutations in 38 pedigrees (50 patients and seven fetuses). Analysis of parental samples when available showed that all mutations tested but one was inherited from the mother. The four missense mutations led to a less severe phenotype (lower frequency of exomphalos) than the other 33 mutations. The following four tumors occurred: one neuroblastoma, one ganglioneuroblastoma, one melanoma, and one acute lymphoid leukemia. Cases of BWS caused by CDKN1C mutations are not rare. CDKN1C sequencing should be performed for BWS patients presenting with abdominal wall defects or cleft palate without 11p15 methylation defects or body asymmetry, or in familial cases of BWS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.22824DOI Listing
September 2015

A small de novo 16q24.1 duplication in a woman with severe clinical features.

Eur J Med Genet 2013 Apr 17;56(4):211-5. Epub 2013 Jan 17.

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), UMR1078, Brest, France.

We report here a de novo 16q24.1 interstitial duplication in a woman with a severe phenotype consistent with mental retardation, spastic paraplegia, severe epilepsy, a narrow and arched palate, malar hypoplasia, little subcutaneous fat and arachnodactyly. Although conventional karyotyping was found to be normal, array-CGH detected a small duplication on chromosome 16. Using QFM-PCR, we characterised its proximal and distal breakpoints. The duplication, which is approximately 250 kb, encompasses seven genes (KIAA0182, GINS2, c16orf74, COX4NB, COX4I1, MIR1910 and IRF8). Several reports have previously described large 16q duplications, and some of these overlap with our region in 16q24.1. Due to the variability of the described phenotypes, the characterisation of small 16q duplications may help to determine critical regions and the genes they contain that are associated with the components of complex phenotypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2013.01.001DOI Listing
April 2013

Cascade testing in families of carriers identified through newborn screening in Western Brittany (France).

J Cyst Fibros 2013 Jul 28;12(4):338-44. Epub 2012 Dec 28.

Inserm, U1078, Brest, F-29200, France.

Background: Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) can lead to the detection of healthy carriers. We report a unique assessment of family testing following the identification of carriers by NBS for over 20 years, in an area where CF is frequent.

Methods: We reviewed all of the carriers identified by NBS between 1991 and 2010 and registered the tests done in those families.

Results: NBS identified 0.1% of the newborns as carriers, which correspond only to 2.6% of the expected carriers born within the period, and 1/3 of those with an increased IRT level. Of the 195 families, 75.9% requested testing (2.5 tests per family). We identified 183 carriers and five 1-in-4 risk couples. Reassurance about genetic status was provided to 96% of the couples.

Conclusions: Carriers detected by NBS appeared to be well managed in our area, and cascade testing that informs on genetic status seems relatively active.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcf.2012.11.009DOI Listing
July 2013

Subtelomeric monosomy 11q and trisomy 16q in siblings and an unrelated child: molecular characterization of two der(11)t(11;16).

Am J Med Genet A 2011 Sep 10;155A(9):2281-7. Epub 2011 Aug 10.

Laboratoire d'Histologie, Cytologie et Cytogénétique, Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de la Santé, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France.

We report here three children with a der(11)t(11;16), two sibs (patients 1 and 2) having inherited a recombinant chromosome from a maternal t(11;16)(q24.3;q23.2) and a third unrelated child with a de novo der(11)t(11;16)(q25;q22.1), leading to partial monosomy 11q and trisomy 16q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and array-CGH were performed to determine the breakpoints involved in the familial and the de novo rearrangements. The partial 11 monosomy extended from 11q24.3 to 11qter and measured 6.17-6.21 Mb in Patients 1 and 2 while the size of the partial 11q25->qter monosomy was estimated at 1.97-2.11 Mb for Patient 3. The partial 16 trisomy extended from 16q23.2 to 16qter and measured 8.93-8.95 Mb in Patients 1 and 2 while the size of the partial 16q22.1->qter trisomy was 20.82 Mb for Patient 3. Intraventricular hemorrhage and transitional thrombocytopenia were found in both sibs but not in the third patient. The FLI1 gene, which is the most relevant gene for thrombocytopenia in Jacobsen syndrome, was neither deleted in family A nor in Patient 3. We suggest that a positional effect could affect the FLI1 expression for these two sibs. Deafness of our three patients confirmed the association of this anomaly to 11q monosomy and tended to confirm the hypothetic role of DFNB20 in Jacobsen syndrome hearing loss. Both sibs shared most of the features commonly observed in Jacobsen syndrome, but not the third patient. This confirmed that terminal 11q trisomy spanning 1 to 1.97-2.11 Mb is not associated with a typical Jacobsen syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.34162DOI Listing
September 2011

Focus on cystic fibrosis and other disorders evidenced in fetuses with sonographic finding of echogenic bowel: 16-year report from Brittany, France.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2010 Dec 8;203(6):592.e1-6. Epub 2010 Oct 8.

Inserm U613, Faculté de Médecine et des Sciences de Santé, Université Brest, Etablissement Français du Sang Bretagne, Brest, France.

Objective: Pregnancies medical follow-up and ultrasonography development have enabled detection of fetal echogenic bowel, a sign associated with various pathologies, including cystic fibrosis. Based on the long experience of a region where cystic fibrosis is frequent (Brittany, France), we describe disorders diagnosed in fetal echogenic bowel fetuses and assess ultrasonography ability in detecting cystic fibrosis in utero.

Study Design: We reviewed the cases of fetal echogenic bowel diagnosed in pregnant women living in Brittany and referred for CFTR gene analysis over the 1992-2007 period (n = 289).

Results: A disorder was diagnosed in 32.2% of the fetuses, cystic fibrosis being the most commonly identified (7.6%). We also found digestive malformations (7.0%), chromosomal abnormalities (3.7%), and maternofetal infections (3.7%). Combining these data with our ongoing newborn screening program since 1989 showed that ultrasonography enabled diagnosis of 10.7% of the cystic fibrosis cases.

Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of pregnancy ultrasound examinations and their efficiency in detecting cystic fibrosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2010.08.033DOI Listing
December 2010