Publications by authors named "Ryoko Kato"

17 Publications

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Addendum: Ishida et al. Formula for the Cross-Sectional Area of the Muscles of the Third Lumbar Vertebra Level from the Twelfth Thoracic Vertebra Level Slice on Computed Tomography. 2020, 5, 47.

Geriatrics (Basel) 2021 06 2;6(2):56. Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Department of Palliative and Supportive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, 1-1 Yazakokarimata, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195, Japan.

The authors would like to make an addendum to their published paper [...].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics6020056DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8293150PMC
June 2021

Thoracic Paravertebral Neurolysis for the Treatment of Intractable Chest Wall Pain Caused by Neoplasms: A Case Series.

Pain Med 2021 Sep;22(9):2133-2135

Department of Palliative and Supportive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pm/pnaa462DOI Listing
September 2021

Assessing skeletal muscle mass based on the cross-sectional area of muscles at the 12th thoracic vertebra level on computed tomography in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

Oral Oncol 2021 02 31;113:105126. Epub 2020 Dec 31.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, 1-1 Yazakokarimata, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195, Japan; Nutritional Therapy Support Center, Aichi Medical University Hospital, 1-1 Yazakokarimata, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195, Japan.

Objectives: This study aimed to create a formula to estimate the third lumbar vertebra (L3) level skeletal muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), known as a standard value to evaluate skeletal muscle mass on computed tomography (CT), using the twelfth thoracic vertebra (Th12) level skeletal muscle CSA on chest CT.

Materials And Methods: This retrospective observational study included patients aged 40 + years with a diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (n = 164). Skeletal muscle CSA on CT images was measured using the Th12 and the L3 levels of pretreatment CT scans. The predictive formula was created based on the five-fold cross-validation method with a linear regression model. Correlations between the predicted L3-level CSA and the actual L3-level CSA were evaluated using r and Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC).

Results: The predictive formula for L3-level CSA from Th12-level CSA was: CSA at L3 (cm) = 14.143 + 0.779 * CSA at Th12 (cm) - 0.212 * Age (y) + 0.502 * Weight (kg) + 13.763 * Sex. Correlations between the predicted and measured L3-level CSA were r = 0.915 [0.886-0.937] and ICC = 0.911 [0.881-0.934].

Conclusion: We developed a formula for predicting skeletal muscle mass from the Th12-level CT slice. The predicted L3-level CSA correlated with the measured L3-level CSA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2020.105126DOI Listing
February 2021

Determining the optimal value of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index to screen older patients with malnutrition risk: A study at a university hospital in Japan.

Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020 Sep 20;20(9):811-816. Epub 2020 Jul 20.

Department of Palliative and Supportive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Japan.

Aim: The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) can predict nutritional risk. However, just a few studies have validated the optimal cut-off value of GNRI for nutrition screening in older patients. Hence, this study aimed to determine the optimal value of GNRI to screen the risk of malnutrition among older patients.

Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was carried out with 5867 consecutive older adult patients who were admitted to an academic hospital in Japan. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were carried out to obtain the optimal cut-off value of GNRI, and the results were compared against the Mini Nutritional Assessment - Short Form and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool. The validation of the obtained cut-off value was examined on the concordance rate of malnutrition diagnosis based on the European Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism criteria.

Results: The mean age of the patients was 76.0 ± 7.0 years. The optimal cut-off value of GNRI for Mini Nutritional Assessment - Short Form ≤11 points was 95.92 (area under the curve 0.827 [0.817-0.838], P < 0.001), and that for Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool ≥1 point was 95.95 (area under the curve 0.788 [0.776-0.799], P < 0.001). By adapting GNRI <96 points as an initial screening cut-off in the European Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism-defined malnutrition process, the concordance rates of comparisons were 98.5% and 98.5% for Mini Nutritional Assessment - Short Form-based and MUST-based diagnosis, respectively.

Conclusions: The study showed GNRI <96 points as the optimal cut-off value for nutritional screening. GNRI might be one of the easy-to-use tools for nutritional screening and for diagnosing malnutrition in older adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020; 20: 811-816.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ggi.13976DOI Listing
September 2020

Formula for the Cross-Sectional Area of the Muscles of the Third Lumbar Vertebra Level from the Twelfth Thoracic Vertebra Level Slice on Computed Tomography.

Geriatrics (Basel) 2020 Sep 5;5(3). Epub 2020 Sep 5.

Department of Palliative and Supportive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, 1-1 Yazakokarimata, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195, Japan.

The purpose of this study was to investigate a means by which to reflect muscle mass using chest computed tomography (CT). A cross-sectional study was conducted with patients aged ≥ 65 years having abdominal and chest CT scans. The formula to predict third lumbar vertebra (L3) cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscles from the erector muscles of the spine at the twelfth thoracic vertebra (Th12) level slice on CT was created using the five-fold cross-validation method. Correlation between predicted L3 CSA and measured L3 CSA of the muscles was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and correlation coefficients () in the data of the development, and predictability was examined with accuracy and -values in the validation study. The development study included 161 patients. The developed formula was as follows: -1006.38 + 16.29 × age + 1161.80 × sex (if female, 0; if male, 1) + 55.91 × body weight + 2.22 × CSA of the erector muscles at Th12. The formula demonstrated strong concordance and correlation (ICC = 0.849 [0.800-0.887] and = 0.858 [0.811-0.894]). The validation study included 34 patients. The accuracy and -value between predicted CSA and measured CSA were high (accuracy = 0.889-0.944, -value = 0.931-0.968). We developed a formula predicting CSA at L3 using Th12 CT slice. This formula could be used to assess decreased muscle mass even with chest CT alone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics5030047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7555041PMC
September 2020

Distinguishing coagulase-negative Staphylococcus bacteremia from contamination using blood-culture positive bottle detection pattern and time to positivity.

J Infect Chemother 2020 Jul 2;26(7):672-675. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Central Laboratory, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan; Fourth Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo University Mizonokuchi Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan.

Aim: Detection of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus in blood culture may be a result of either bacteremia or contamination. This often leads to diagnostic uncertainly. Our objective was to develop a method for differentiating whether a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus sp. positive blood culture represents bacteremia or contamination based on positive bottle detection pattern and time to positivity (TTP).

Methods: This study included 155 and 51 adults with positive blood cultures for Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus hominis, respectively, over a three-year period from 2016 to 2018. Positive blood culture cases were categorized as either bacteremia or contamination based on the clinically available information, and the detection pattern and TTP in each category were investigated.

Results: A total of 57, 92, and 6 S. epidermidis positive blood cultures were categorized as bacteremia, contamination, and undetermined, respectively, whereas 15 and 36 S. hominis positive blood cultures were categorized as bacteremia and contamination, respectively. For positive blood cultures categorized as bacteremia, all four bottles in two sets of blood cultures were positive in 47/47 S. epidermidis and 14/14 S. hominis, respectively, whereas either one bottle in each of two sets or three bottles in two sets were positive in 10/19 S. epidermidis and 1/4 S. hominis, respectively; most of those TTPs were <48 h. Among them, the TTP in catheter-related blood stream infection was <24 h.

Conclusion: Although clinical assessment is crucial to differentiate between bacteremia and contamination, a combination of positive bottle detection pattern and TTP is a valuable diagnostic auxiliary tool.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiac.2020.02.004DOI Listing
July 2020

Malnutrition at Admission Predicts In-Hospital Falls in Hospitalized Older Adults.

Nutrients 2020 Feb 20;12(2). Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Department of Palliative and Supportive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute 480-1195, Japan.

Malnutrition leads to poor prognoses, including a predisposition to falls. Few studies have investigated the relationship between malnutrition and falls during hospitalization. This study aimed to determine malnutrition's association with falls during hospitalization. A retrospective observational study was conducted. Patients aged ≥65 years that were admitted to and discharged from a university hospital between April 2018 and March 2019 were examined. Patients with independent basic activities of daily living were included. Diagnosis of malnutrition was based on the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) criteria at admission. Disease information such as the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and reasons for hospitalization were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier curve and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed. Data from 6081 patients (mean age: 74.4 ± 6.1 years; males: 58.1%) were analyzed. The mean CCI was 2.3 ± 2.8 points. Malnutrition was detected in 668 (11.0%) and falls occurred in 55 (0.9%) patients. Malnourished patients experienced a higher fall rate than those without malnutrition (2.4% vs. 0.7%, log-rank test < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, malnutrition had the highest hazard ratio for falls among covariates (hazard ratio 2.78, 95% confidence interval 1.51-5.00, = 0.001). In conclusion, malnutrition at the time of admission to hospital predicts in-hospital falls.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12020541DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071417PMC
February 2020

Development and Predictors of Sarcopenic Dysphagia during Hospitalization of Older Adults.

Nutrients 2019 Dec 26;12(1). Epub 2019 Dec 26.

Department of Palliative and Supportive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, 1-1 Yazakokarimata, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195, Japan.

The study aimed to investigate the impact of sarcopenia and sarcopenia-related conditions on the development of swallowing disorders during hospitalization. Older adult inpatients (n = 8768) without swallowing disorders in the premorbid period were studied. Sarcopenia-related conditions were evaluated in terms of nutritional status, physical status, and ambulatory conditions as well as hand-grip strength and muscle mass assessed by calf circumference. Development of swallowing disorders was defined based on food texture at discharge from the hospital. The patients' mean age was 76.1 ± 6.9 years. A total of 374 (4.3%) patients developed swallowing disorders during hospitalization. They were older, with poorer nutritional status, and had more decline of physical performance than those without swallowing disorders. Performance Status score (odds ratio (OR) = 1.28 (1.12-1.46) < 0.001), ambulatory dependency (OR = 1.72 (1.09-2.71), = 0.020), malnutrition score (OR = 0.92 (0.87-0.97), = 0.002), insufficient nutritional intake (OR = 2.33 (1.60-3.40), < 0.001), and length of stay (OR = 1.01 (1.00-1.01), = 0.001) were independent contributing factors for swallowing disorder development in the multivariate analysis. The presence of possible sarcopenia was also a contributor to swallowing disorder development. In conclusion, swallowing disorders could develop in patients with possible sarcopenia and sarcopenia-related conditions during hospitalization. Clinicians should be aware of this risk and provide appropriate interventions to prevent sarcopenic dysphagia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12010070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7019288PMC
December 2019

Impact of edema on length of calf circumference in older adults.

Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019 Oct 8;19(10):993-998. Epub 2019 Aug 8.

Department of Palliative and Supportive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan.

Aim: Calf circumference, which is a known simple indicator of muscle mass, increases during edema. However, the extent to which edema increases calf circumference in older adults is unclear.

Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study included patients aged ≥65 years whose nutritional status was assessed by nutrition support teams. Two different types of matching models in each sex were created according to the presence of edema on the right lower limb. All models were adjusted by age, body height, handgrip strength and performance status. Sarcopenia was diagnosed based on both reduced calf circumference and decline of handgrip strength. The prevalence of sarcopenia was estimated before and after adjustment for increment of calf circumference.

Results: In total, 2101 patients were included. Multifactor matching models showed that the mean difference in calf circumference between pairs was 1.6 cm (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-2.1, P < 0.001) for women and 2.1 cm (95% CI 1.6-2.7, P < 0.001) for men. The propensity score matching model similarly showed a mean difference of 1.6 cm (95% CI 1.1-2.1, P < 0.001) for women and 2.0 cm (95% CI 1.5-2.6, P < 0.001) for men. The prevalence of sarcopenia before and after adjusting for an edema-related increase in calf circumference was 42.6%/48.6% for women and 35.3%/38.5%-38.7% for men.

Conclusions: Edema in the lower limb increased the calf circumference by approximately 2 cm. When using calf circumference to assess muscle mass in patients with edema, the increase in circumference should be subtracted from the baseline circumference for an accurate assessment. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; 19: 993-998.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ggi.13756DOI Listing
October 2019

Plantar injection of formalin in rats reduces the expression of a potassium chroride cotransporter KCC2 in the spinal cord and a kinase inhibitor suppresses this reduction.

Biomed Res 2016 ;37(4):243-9

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is released from activated microglia during neuropathic pain and is hypothesized to downregulate the expression of the potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) via the TrkB receptor. Previous studies reported that KCC2 is downregulated 5 min after the plantar injection of formalin in rats; however, the mechanism behind this decrease in KCC2 expression during acute inflammatory pain remains unknown. In this study, we determined whether the TrkB receptor contributes to the expression of KCC2 during the acute pain. Five minutes after the plantar injection of formalin in rats, the ratio of KCC2-immunoreactive area in layer II of the spinal cord significantly decreased on the stimulated side compared to the unaffected side. On the other hand, this response was inhibited by the injection of a kinase inhibitor, K252a, in the subarachnoid space 15 min before the formalin injection. These findings suggest that in acute pain, the TrkB receptor may contribute to the decrease in the expression of KCC2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2220/biomedres.37.243DOI Listing
January 2017

Dexmedetomidine suppresses long-term potentiation in the hippocampal CA1 field of anesthetized rats.

J Anesth 2014 Dec 23;28(6):828-32. Epub 2014 May 23.

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Kita-15, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-8638, Japan,

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine (DEX) on hippocampal synaptic activity in vivo.

Methods: The adult rats used for this study received a intraperitoneal bolus injection of 3, 10, 30, or 100 μg/kg of DEX or an equivalent volume of saline. Electrophysiological recording of the hippocampal CA1 region was initiated 20 min after drug administration. The results are expressed as the percentages of the population spike amplitude measured just before high-frequency stimulation (HFS). The electrophysiological data were analyzed with an area under the curve (AUC) of 10-60 min after HFS. Moreover, to investigate the sedative dose of DEX in rats, we recorded the duration of loss of spontaneous movement after the administration of each dose of DEX.

Results: Intraperitoneal administration of DEX at doses of 30 and 100 μg/kg induced a range of sedative effects. The AUC measurements were significantly lower in the 30 and 100 μg/kg groups than in those injected with vehicle (vehicle: 8.81 ± 0.49, n = 7; DEX 30 µg/kg: 6.02 ± 0.99, n = 6; DEX 100 µg/kg: 5.10 ± 0.43, n = 5; P < 0.05).

Conclusion: The results of our in vivo study reveal that sedative doses of DEX impaired the induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). These findings may signify a causal link between DEX-induced sedative action and hippocampal LTP suppression, providing a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the DEX-induced sedative and/or amnestic effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00540-014-1853-3DOI Listing
December 2014

Novel inhibitor of bacterial sphingomyelinase, SMY-540, developed based on three-dimensional structure analysis.

J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem 2014 Jun 14;29(3):303-10. Epub 2013 Mar 14.

Department of Microbiology and.

Context: Bacterial sphingomyelinase (SMase) is thought to play a crucial role in bacterial evasion of the immune response during the early stages of infections.

Objective: The objective of this study was to predict the chemical structure required for competitive SMase inhibition, then synthesize and test the effect of potential inhibitors on the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin (SM) and protection against infection by Bacillus cereus.

Materials And Methods: We synthesized 10 potential SMase inhibitors, derivatives of RY221B-a analogues, based on predictions from three-dimensional structural analysis. We then tested the effect of these compounds on the inhibition of SM hydrolysis and protection of mice inoculated with B. cereus.

Results: One compound, SMY-540, displayed a strong inhibitory effect (IC₅₀ = 0.8 μM) upon SMase and prevented mortality in mice.

Conclusion: SMY-540 is an effective inhibitor of Bc-SMase and has potential for use in the development of drugs to treat infectious diseases caused by bacteria that produce SMase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/14756366.2013.777717DOI Listing
June 2014

Role of sphingomyelinase in infectious diseases caused by Bacillus cereus.

PLoS One 2012 6;7(6):e38054. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Yamashiro-cho, Tokushima, Japan.

Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) is a pathogen in opportunistic infections. Here we show that Bacillus cereus sphingomyelinase (Bc-SMase) is a virulence factor for septicemia. Clinical isolates produced large amounts of Bc-SMase, grew in vivo, and caused death among mice, but ATCC strains isolated from soil did not. A transformant of the ATCC strain carrying a recombinant plasmid containing the Bc-SMase gene grew in vivo, but that with the gene for E53A, which has little enzymatic activity, did not. Administration of an anti-Bc-SMase antibody and immunization against Bc-SMase prevented death caused by the clinical isolates, showing that Bc-SMase plays an important role in the diseases caused by B. cereus. Treatment of mouse macrophages with Bc-SMase resulted in a reduction in the generation of H(2)O(2) and phagocytosis of macrophages induced by peptidoglycan (PGN), but no effect on the release of TNF-α and little release of LDH under our experimental conditions. Confocal laser microscopy showed that the treatment of mouse macrophages with Bc-SMase resulted in the formation of ceramide-rich domains. A photobleaching analysis suggested that the cells treated with Bc-SMase exhibited a reduction in membrane fluidity. The results suggest that Bc-SMase is essential for the hydrolysis of SM in membranes, leading to a reduction in phagocytosis.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0038054PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3368938PMC
November 2012

Association of muscle hardness with muscle tension dynamics: a physiological property.

Eur J Appl Physiol 2012 Jan 17;112(1):105-12. Epub 2011 Apr 17.

Institute of Physical Education, Keio University, Kanagawa, Japan.

This study aimed to investigate the relationship between muscle hardness and muscle tension in terms of length-tension relationship. A frog gastrocnemius muscle sample was horizontally mounted on the base plate inside a chamber and was stretched from 100 to 150% of the pre-length, in 5% increments. After each step of muscle lengthening, electrical field stimulation for induction of tetanus was applied using platinum-plate electrodes positioned on either side of the muscle submerged in Ringer's solution. The measurement of muscle hardness, i.e., applying perpendicular distortion, was performed whilst maintaining the plateau of passive and tetanic tension. The relationship between normalised tension and normalised muscle hardness was evaluated. The length-hardness diagram could be created from the modification with the length-tension diagram. It is noteworthy that muscle hardness was proportional to passive and total tension. Regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between muscle hardness and passive and total tension, with a significant positive slope (passive tension: r = 0.986, P < 0.001; total tension: r = 0.856, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our results suggest that muscle hardness depends on muscle tension in most ranges of muscle length in the length-tension diagram.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-011-1959-3DOI Listing
January 2012

Relationship between muscle tension and hardness in isolated frog muscle with electrical stimulation.

Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2007 ;2007:4818-21

Faculty of Science and Technblogy, Keio University, Yokohama, 223-8522, Japan.

Muscle hardness increases as the contractile level increases. This increase is caused by changes in structure of the muscle fiber and blood flow; however, the mechanism of increasing hardness has not been clearly demonstrated. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between isolated frog muscle tension and hardness. Gastrocnemius muscles were mounted horizontally in a chamber. The femur was fixed, and the Achilles tendon was attached to a stretching device. The muscle tension and hardness were measured during various muscle stretches and with and without electrical stimulation. We applied two protocols. In the first, the muscle was stimulated and then stretched, whereas, in the second, it was stretched and then stimulated. The muscle hardness was proportional to the muscle tension at each amount of stretching in both protocols. There were no significant differences between protocols 1 and 2, although the stretch enhancement of the muscle force was expected in protocol 1. In our experiments, the muscle length corresponds to the ascending limb of the length-tension curves of a sarcomere. The results of this study suggest that the relationship between muscle tension and hardness was not affected by the stretch enhancement in the ascending limb of the length-tension curve. The slope of the regression line between the muscle tension and hardness decreased as the amount of the stretch increased. The decrease of the slope might be caused by structural changes in the filaments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2007.4353418DOI Listing
April 2008

Quantitative evaluation of spasticity in upper limbs in hemiplegic subject using a mathmatical model.

Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2005;2005:6612-4

Dept. Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Fac. Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama, Japan.

This is a proposal for a new technique for evaluating spasticity in the upper limbs of hemiplegic patients. Each subject sat on a chair or stood up, and his or her forearm was extended or flexed by a physician. The subject was instructed to relax. The elbow joint angle, torque, and electromyograms (EMGs) of the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, and brachioradialis muscles were measured. The relationship between the elbow joint angle and torque was approximated with a mathematical model, which consisted of elastic components depending on both muscle activities and elbow joint angle, by the least squares method. The inertia and visco-elastic coefficients were obtained. The elbow angle response was then estimated with the obtained inertia and visco-elastic coefficients by the Runge-Kutta method, and the estimated elbow angle was compared to the observed one. The relationships between the elbow angle and torque were approximated well with the model. Next, the average elasticity was calculated and compared to the modified Ashworth scale. The average elasticity had a tendency to increase as the Ash- worth scale increased. In addition, the average elasticity varied depending on the posture of the subjects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2005.1616017DOI Listing
September 2008

Localization of CD44 (hyaluronan receptor) and hyaluronan in rat mandibular condyle.

J Histochem Cytochem 2005 Jan;53(1):113-20

Division of Hard Tissue Research, Institute for Oral Science, Matsumoto Dental University, 1780 Hirooka-Gohara, Shiojiri 399-0781, Japan.

CD44 is a multifunctional adhesion molecule that binds to hyaluronan (HA), type I collagen, and fibronectin. We investigated localization of CD44 and HA in mandibular condylar cartilage compared with the growth plate and the articular cartilage, to clarify the characteristics of chondrocytes. We also performed Western blotting using a lysate of mandibular condyle. In mandibular condyle, CD44-positive cells were seen in the surface region of the fibrous cell layer and in the proliferative cell layer. Western blotting revealed that the molecular weight of CD44 in condyle was 78 to 86 kD. Intense reactivity for HA was detected on the surface of the condyle and the lacunae of the hypertrophic cell layer. Moderate labeling was seen in cartilage matrix of the proliferative and maturative layer. Weak labeling was also seen in the fibrous cell layer. In growth plate and articular cartilage, HA was detected in all cell layers. However, chondrocytes of these cartilages did not exhibit reactivity for CD44. These results suggest that chondrocytes in the mandibular condylar cartilage differ in expression of CD44 from those in tibial growth plate and articular cartilage. Cell-matrix interaction between CD44 and HA may play an important role in the proliferation of chondrocytes in the mandibular condyle.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/002215540505300113DOI Listing
January 2005
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