Publications by authors named "Ryan Margolis"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Multiscale computational modeling of cancer growth using features derived from microCT images.

Sci Rep 2021 09 17;11(1):18524. Epub 2021 Sep 17.

Department of Bioengineering, University of Texas at Dallas, BSB 13.929, 800 W Campbell Rd, Richardson, TX, 75080, USA.

Advances in medical imaging technologies now allow noninvasive image acquisition from individual patients at high spatiotemporal resolutions. A relatively new effort of predictive oncology is to develop a paradigm for forecasting the future status of an individual tumor given initial conditions and an appropriate mathematical model. The objective of this study was to introduce a comprehensive multiscale computational method to predict cancer and microvascular network growth patterns. A rectangular lattice-based model was designed so different evolutionary scenarios could be simulated and for predicting the impact of diffusible factors on tumor morphology and size. Further, the model allows prediction-based simulation of cell and microvascular behavior. Like a single cell, each agent is fully realized within the model and interactions are governed in part by machine learning methods. This multiscale computational model was developed and incorporated input information from in vivo microscale computed tomography (microCT) images acquired from breast cancer-bearing mice. It was found that as the difference between expansion of the cancer cell population and microvascular network increases, cells undergo proliferation and migration with a greater probability compared to other phenotypes. Overall, multiscale computational model agreed with both theoretical expectations and experimental findings (microCT images) not used during model training.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-97966-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8448838PMC
September 2021

Evaluating Microelectrode Arrays in Peripheral Nerve Using Micro Computed Tomography

Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2020 07;2020:3432-3435

Many advances have been made with imaging of implanted neural devices; however, the ability to image whole nerve samples remains limited. Further, few imaging modalities are well suited for visualizing both whole devices in vivo and individual microelectrodes within a nerve. In this study, we used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to evaluate Wireless Floating Microelectrode Arrays (WMFAs) implanted in rat sciatic nerve at the level of whole devices and individual electrodes. WFMAs were also used to track selective recruitment of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the rear paw, which was achieved by each implanted device (n=6) during chronic implantation. Evoked limb motion was correlated to end-of-study assessments using micro-CT to visualize electrode locations within the fascicular structure of the sciatic nerve. Results of this study show that micro-CT imaging can provide valuable assessments of microelectrode arrays implanted in peripheral nerves for both whole devices visualized in vivo and individual electrodes visualized in whole nerve tissue samples.Clinical relevance- This work informs the use of micro-computed tomography as a tool for correlating neural device performance with physical attributes of the implant location.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/EMBC44109.2020.9176598DOI Listing
July 2020

Monitoring Progression of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Using Photoacoustics and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound.

Transl Oncol 2019 Jul 20;12(7):973-980. Epub 2019 May 20.

Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. Electronic address:

Breast cancer is the leading form of cancer in women, accounting for approximately 41,400 deaths in 2018. While a variety of risk factors have been identified, physical exercise has been linked to reducing both the risk and aggressiveness of breast cancer. Within breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a common finding. However, less than 25% of DCIS tumors actually progress into invasive breast cancer, resulting in overtreatment. This overtreatment is due to a lack of predictive precursors to assess aggressiveness and development of DCIS. We hypothesize that tissue oxygenation and perfusion measured by photoacoustic and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging, respectively, can predict DCIS aggressiveness. To test this, 20 FVB/NJ and 20 SV40Tag mice that genetically develop DCIS-like breast cancers were divided evenly into exercise and control groups and imaged over the course of 6 weeks. Tissue oxygenation was a predictive precursor to invasive breast cancer for FVB/NJ mice (P = 0.015) in the early stages of tumor development. Meanwhile, perfusion results were inconclusive (P > 0.2) as a marker for disease progression. Moreover, voluntary physical exercise resulted in lower weekly tumor growth and significantly improved median survival (P = 0.014).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tranon.2019.04.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6529783PMC
July 2019
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