Publications by authors named "Russell G G Condon"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Fluorinert, an oxygen carrier, improves cell culture performance in deep square 96-well plates by facilitating oxygen transfer.

Biotechnol Prog 2012 Jan-Feb;28(1):171-8. Epub 2011 Sep 26.

Protein Expression Technologies, Biotechnology Process Development, Merck Research Laboratories, 1011 Morris Avenue, Union, NJ 07083, USA.

In bioprocess development, the 96-well plate format has been widely used for high-throughput screening of production cell line or culture conditions. However, suspension cell cultures in conventional 96-well plates often fail to reach high cell density under normal agitation presumably due to constraints in oxygen transfer. Although more vigorous agitation can improve gas transfer in 96-well plate format, it often requires specialized instruments. In this report, we employed Fluorinert, a biologically inert perfluorocarbon, to improve oxygen transfer in 96-well plate and to enable the growth of a Chinese Hamster Ovary cell line expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody. When different amounts of Fluorinert were added to the cell culture medium, a dose-dependent improvement in cell growth was observed in both conventional and deep square 96-well plates. When sufficient Fluorinert was present in the culture, the cell growth rate, the peak cell density, and recombinant protein production levels achieved in deep square 96-wells were comparable to cultures in ventilated shake flasks. Although Fluorinert is known to dissolve gases such as oxygen and CO(2), it does not dissolve nor extract medium components, such as glucose, lactate, or amino acids. We conclude that mixing Fluorinert with culture media is a suitable model for miniaturization of cell line development and process optimization. Proper cell growth and cellular productivity can be obtained with a standard shaker without the need for any additional aeration or vigorous agitation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/btpr.712DOI Listing
May 2012

Development of a Chinese hamster ovary cell line for recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene expression.

Biotechnol Prog 2003 Jan-Feb;19(1):137-43

Schering-Plough Research Institute, Biotechnology Development, 1011 Morris Avenue, Union, New Jersey 07083, USA.

Recombinant human adenovirus (rhAd) has been used extensively for functional protein expression in mammalian cells including those of human and nonhuman origin. High-level protein production by rhAd vectors is expected in their permissive host cells, such as the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cell line. This is attributed primarily to the permissiveness of HEK293 to rhAd infection and their ability to support viral DNA replication by providing the missing El proteins. However, the HEK293 cells tend to suffer from cytopathic effect (CPE) as a result of virus replication. Under these circumstances, the host cell function is compromised and the culture viability will be reduced. Consequently, newly synthesized polypeptides may not be processed properly at posttranslational levels. Therefore, the usefulness of HEK293 cells for the expression of complex targets such as secreted proteins could be limited. In the search for a more robust cell line as a production host for rhAd expression vectors, a series of screening experiments was performed to isolate clones from Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO-K1) cells. First, multiple rounds of infection of CHO-K1 cells were performed utilizing an rhAd expressing GFP. After each cycle of infection, a small population of CHO cells with high GFP levels was enriched by FACS. Second, individual clones more permissive to human adenovirus infection were isolated from the highly enriched subpopulation by serial dilution. A single clone, designated CHO-K1-C5, was found to be particularly permissive to rhAd infection than the parental pool and has served as a production host in the successful expression of several secreted proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bp0200696DOI Listing
October 2003