Publications by authors named "Ruhaida Rusmin"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Clay-polymer nanocomposites: Progress and challenges for use in sustainable water treatment.

J Hazard Mater 2020 02 29;383:121125. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

Korea Biochar Research Centre & Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Contaminant removal from water involves various technologies among which adsorption is considered to be simple, effective, economical, and sustainable. In recent years, nanocomposites prepared by combining clay minerals and polymers have emerged as a novel technology for cleaning contaminated water. Here, we provide an overview of various types of clay-polymer nanocomposites focusing on their synthesis processes, characteristics, and possible applications in water treatment. By evaluating various mechanisms and factors involved in the decontamination processes, we demonstrate that the nanocomposites can overcome the limitations of individual polymer and clay components such as poor specificity, pH dependence, particle size sensitivity, and low water wettability. We also discuss different regeneration and wastewater treatment options (e.g., membrane, coagulant, and barrier/columns) using clay-polymer nanocomposites. Finally, we provide an economic analysis of the use of these adsorbents and suggest future research directions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.121125DOI Listing
February 2020

Removal of lead from aqueous solution using superparamagnetic palygorskite nanocomposite: Material characterization and regeneration studies.

Chemosphere 2017 Nov 13;186:1006-1015. Epub 2017 Aug 13.

Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), The University of Newcastle, ATC Building, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia; CRC CARE - Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, P.O. Box 486, Salisbury, SA 5106, Australia. Electronic address:

A palygorskite-iron oxide nanocomposite (Pal-IO) was synthesized in situ by embedding magnetite into the palygorskite structure through co-precipitation method. The physico-chemical characteristics of Pal-IO and their pristine components were examined through various spectroscopic and micro-analytical techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of Pal-IO in removing Pb(II) from aqueous solution. The surface morphology, magnetic recyclability and adsorption efficiency of regenerated Pal-IO using desorbing agents HCl (Pal-IO-HCl) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-Na) (Pal-IO-EDTA) were compared. The nanocomposite showed a superparamagnetic property (magnetic susceptibility: 20.2 emu g) with higher specific surface area (99.8 m g) than the pristine palygorskite (49.4 m g) and iron oxide (72.6 m g). Pal-IO showed a maximum Pb(II) adsorption capacity of 26.6 mg g (experimental condition: 5 g L adsorbent loading, 150 agitations min, initial Pb(II) concentration from 20 to 500 mg L, at 25 °C) with easy separation of the spent adsorbent. The adsorption data best fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model (R = 0.9995) and pseudo-second order kinetic model (R = 0.9945). Pb(II) desorption using EDTA as the complexing agent produced no disaggregation of Pal-IO crystal bundles, and was able to preserve the composite's magnetic recyclability. Pal-IO-EDTA exhibited almost 64% removal capacity after three cycles of regeneration and preserved the nanocomposite's structural integrity and magnetic properties (15.6 emu g). The nanocomposite holds advantages as a sustainable material (easily separable and recyclable) for potential application in purifying heavy metal contaminated wastewaters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.08.036DOI Listing
November 2017

Mild acid and alkali treated clay minerals enhance bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in long-term contaminated soil: A C-tracer study.

Environ Pollut 2017 Apr 25;223:255-265. Epub 2017 Jan 25.

Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, ACT Building, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia; Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address:

Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soils requires a higher microbial viability and an increased PAH bioavailability. The clay/modified clay-modulated bacterial degradation could deliver a more efficient removal of PAHs in soils depending on the bioavailability of the compounds. In this study, we modified clay minerals (smectite and palygorskite) with mild acid (HCl) and alkali (NaOH) treatments (0.5-3 M), which increased the surface area and pore volume of the products, and removed the impurities without collapsing the crystalline structure of clay minerals. In soil incubation studies, supplements with the clay products increased bacterial growth in the order: 0.5 M HCl ≥ unmodified ≥ 0.5 M NaOH ≥ 3 M NaOH ≥ 3 M HCl for smectite, and 0.5 M HCl ≥ 3 M NaOH ≥ 0.5 M NaOH ≥ 3 M HCl ≥ unmodified for palygorskite. AC-tracing study showed that the mild acid/alkali-treated clay products increased the PAH biodegradation (5-8%) in the order of 0.5 M HCl ≥ unmodified > 3 M NaOH ≥ 0.5 M NaOH for smectite, and 0.5 M HCl > 0.5 M NaOH ≥ unmodified ≥ 3 M NaOH for palygorskite. The biodegradation was correlated (r = 0.81) with the bioavailable fraction of PAHs and microbial growth as affected particularly by the 0.5 M HCl and 0.5 M NaOH-treated clay minerals. These results could be pivotal in developing a clay-modulated bioremediation technology for cleaning up PAH-contaminated soils and sediments in the field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.01.022DOI Listing
April 2017

Bioremediation of PAHs and VOCs: Advances in clay mineral-microbial interaction.

Environ Int 2015 Dec 25;85:168-81. Epub 2015 Sep 25.

Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, SA 5095, Australia; Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, ATC Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia; Global Centre for Environmental Remediation, ATC Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia. Electronic address:

Bioremediation is an effective strategy for cleaning up organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Advanced bioremediation implies that biotic agents are more efficient in degrading the contaminants completely. Bioremediation by microbial degradation is often employed and to make this process efficient, natural and cost-effective materials can serve as supportive matrices. Clay/modified clay minerals are effective adsorbents of PAHs/VOCs, and readily available substrate and habitat for microorganisms in the natural soil and sediment. However, the mechanism underpinning clay-mediated biodegradation of organic compounds is often unclear, and this requires critical investigation. This review describes the role of clay/modified clay minerals in hydrocarbon bioremediation through interaction with microbial agents in specific scenarios. The vision is on a faster, more efficient and cost-effective bioremediation technique using clay-based products. This review also proposes future research directions in the field of clay modulated microbial degradation of hydrocarbons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2015.09.017DOI Listing
December 2015
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