Publications by authors named "Ruchi Kaushik"

5 Publications

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Locked and (Un)-Loaded Discussions: A Pediatric Resident Safe Firearm Storage Counseling Curriculum.

MedEdPORTAL 2020 12 4;16:11028. Epub 2020 Dec 4.

Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine and Children's Hospital of San Antonio.

Introduction: Firearm-related fatalities are a public health crisis. Despite recognizing the vital nature of counseling parents/caregivers regarding firearm safety, residents remain uncomfortable asking patients about the presence of firearms in homes and discussing American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations regarding safe firearm storage.

Methods: We designed an interactive curriculum to improve pediatric resident knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behavior regarding counseling families about safe firearm storage. Components of the curriculum included a didactic session, a hands-on experience to better understand the parts of a firearm and its relevant storage/safety devices, and role-playing scenarios.

Results: The curriculum was delivered to 53 pediatric residents in two different residency programs. A statistically significant improvement in knowledge and skills related to safe firearm storage counseling was demonstrated in both settings. Furthermore, a statistically significant change in counseling behavior was noted among one resident group. Curriculum evaluation revealed overwhelmingly positive learner responses.

Discussion: An adaptable interactive safe firearm storage counseling curriculum was well received by pediatric residents and improved resident knowledge and skills, resulting in an increase in safe firearm storage counseling discussions with families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.11028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7727610PMC
December 2020

Is Managed Care Better Care? The Effects of Medicaid Managed Care on Children With Medical Complexity.

Hosp Pediatr 2020 08 15;10(8):709-711. Epub 2020 Jul 15.

The Children's Hospital of San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas; and Department of General Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/hpeds.2020-0046DOI Listing
August 2020

My Fourth Child.

Authors:
Ruchi Kaushik

Acad Pediatr 2020 Nov - Dec;20(8):1061-1062. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of San Antonio, Baylor College of Medicine, San Antonio, Tex. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2020.01.005DOI Listing
January 2020

Pediatric bicycle-related head injuries: a population-based study in a county without a helmet law.

Inj Epidemiol 2015 Dec 7;2(1):16. Epub 2015 Jul 7.

Mayo Clinic Children's Center, 200 First Street SW, Mayo 16E, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.

Background: Head injuries are the leading cause of death among cyclists, 85 % of which can be prevented by wearing a bicycle helmet. This study aims to estimate the incidence of pediatric bicycle-related injuries in Olmsted County and assess differences in injuries between those wearing helmets vs. not.

Methods: Olmsted County, Minnesota residents 5 to 18 years of age with a diagnostic code consistent with an injury associated with the use of a bicycle between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2011, were identified. Incidence rates were calculated and standardized to the age and sex distribution of the 2000 US white population. Type of injuries, the percentage requiring head CT or X-ray, and hospitalization were compared using a chi-square test. Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission, permanent neurologic injury, seizure, need for mechanical ventilation, and mortality were compared using Fisher's exact test.

Results: A total of 1189 bicycle injuries were identified. The overall age-adjusted incidence rate of all injuries was 278 (95 % CI, 249 to 306) per 100,000 person-years for females and 589 (95 % CI, 549 to 629) for males. The corresponding rates for head injuries were 104 (95 % CI, 87 to 121) for females and 255 (95 % CI, 229 to 281) for males. Of patients with head injuries, 17.4 % were documented to have been wearing a helmet, 44.8 % were documented as not wearing a helmet, and 37.8 % had no helmet use documentation. Patients with a head injury who were documented as not wearing a helmet were significantly more likely to undergo imaging of the head (32.1 percent vs. 11.5 %; p < 0.001) and to experience a brain injury (28.1 vs. 13.8 %; p = 0.008).

Conclusions: Children and adolescents continue to ride bicycles without wearing helmets, resulting in severe head and facial injuries and mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40621-015-0048-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5005552PMC
December 2015

Anasarca, hypoalbuminemia, and anemia: what is the correlation?

Clin Pediatr (Phila) 2014 Jun 18;53(7):710-2. Epub 2014 Mar 18.

Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0009922814526990DOI Listing
June 2014