Publications by authors named "Rubens Caliento"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Poor oral health status and short-term outcome of kidney transplantation.

Spec Care Dentist 2020 Nov 21;40(6):549-554. Epub 2020 Aug 21.

Department of Stomatology, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Aims: This study aims to know whether poor oral health increases the risk of acute rejection and hospitalization in kidney allograft recipients.

Methods And Results: This is a prospective cohort study. The same dentist followed participants for 2 months after renal transplant for monitoring oral health (clinical evaluation, DTMF index, and CPITN index), signs of graft rejection, infection, and hospitalization. We compiled rates and reasons for hospital readmission or extended hospital stay. The CPITN had a mean score of 0.38 ± 0.71, increasing to 0.90 ± 0.84, 60 days after transplant (P < .001). No one rejected the graft in the period of study. Patients with older age (P = .009; OR: 1.07; CI 95% 1.01-1.12) were at higher risk of hospitalization at each year of age and patients presenting pretransplant dental focus (P = .001; OR: 7.23; CI 95% 2.13-24.56) had 7.23 times more chance to be hospitalized in the first 2 months after the transplant. One participant was hospitalized due to acute foci of dental infection.

Conclusion: There was an association between dental focus and hospital readmission/stay. However, our methods do not provide conclusive proof of causality. Hospitalization due to acute dental infection was rare.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/scd.12512DOI Listing
November 2020

Salivary shedding of herpesviruses in renal transplant recipients.

J Investig Clin Dent 2018 Nov 30;9(4):e12356. Epub 2018 Jul 30.

Department of Stomatology, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to describe the salivary shedding of human herpesviruses (HHV) in renal transplant recipients and to observe the oral manifestations in this group.

Methods: A prospective case-control study was conducted with a study group of 20 renal transplant recipients and a control group of 20 non-transplanted, immunocompetent individuals. Clinical examination evaluated the presence of drug-induced gingival overgrowth (DIGO), salivary flow, and caries. Stimulated saliva was collected from both groups, with HHV being detected by using real-time polymerase chain reaction.

Results: The mean age of the study group was 45.90 ± 9.89 years, with 55% (11/20) being female, 60% (12/20) being Caucasian, 65% (13/20) having a deceased donor, and 70% (14/20) having used tacrolimus as the main immunosuppressive drug. Renal transplant recipients had shedding of more herpesviruses compared to the control group, with the exception of HHV-7. Statistical significance was found for herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) (P = 0.017) and cytomegalovirus (P = 0.035). DIGO was observed in seven patients (35%), with 35% (7/20) presenting with decreased salivary flow and four (20%) reporting xerostomia.

Conclusion: Renal transplant recipients excreted herpesviruses more often than control individuals, especially HSV-1. Decreased salivary flow and xerostomia were more frequent in patients who used tacrolimus, whereas those who used cyclosporine had more cases of DIGO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jicd.12356DOI Listing
November 2018

Prevalence of and Factors Associated with Actinic Cheilitis in Extractive Mining Workers.

Braz Dent J 2018 Mar-Apr;29(2):214-221

Oral Pathology, USP - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of actinic cheilitis among extractive mining workers and factors associated with the condition, especially the relationship between clinical appearance and the length of occupational exposure to sunlight. A cross-sectional study was performed in Dona Inês, Paraíba, Brazil between 2014 and 2015. A clinical examination, clinical photography and a questionnaire were applied to 201 extractive mining workers. The T-student's, ANOVA one-way, Fisher's exact and Pearson chi-squared tests were performed and the significance level was set at 5%. A high prevalence of actinic cheilitis was observed (38.8%). Length of occupational exposure to sunlight in months (169.63±112.68, p=0.002) was associated with actinic cheilitis. Most workers were Caucasian (p<0.001) and aged 37.41±12.15 years (p=0.004). The time of occupational exposure to sunlight was significant in relation to the following clinical features: atrophy (225.75±97.31; p=0.024); blurred demarcation between the vermilion border of the lip and the skin (186.68±113.15; p=0.032); vertical fissures (210.09±123.07; p=0.046); white and red spotting (199.51±91.80; p=0.004); hard consistency of the lip (225.81±122.34; p=0.012). A high prevalence of actinic cheilitis was found. Age and ethnicity were associated with the presence of AC. Severe clinical presentations of actinic cheilitis were found among participants who had worked for at least 185 months (approximately 15 years) exposed to the sun.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0103-6440201801605DOI Listing
December 2018

Clinical outcome of dental procedures among renal transplant recipients.

Spec Care Dentist 2018 May 6;38(3):146-149. Epub 2018 Apr 6.

Head of Special Care Dentistry Center, University of São Paulo School of Dentistry, Brazil.

Aims: To compare outcomes of dental procedures among a group of renal transplant recipients who had received antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) before the procedure and another group that had not received AP.

Methods And Results: The records of all renal transplant patients treated at the Special Care Dentistry Center (SCDC) were assessed. Dental procedures documented in the records were classified as invasive or noninvasive. All dental procedures performed were compiled, and the prescription or nonprescription of prophylactic antibiotics, and the incidence and description of postoperative complications after invasive procedures were recorded. Eighty-seven records were evaluated. Out of 190 invasive procedures all were simple dental extractions, 107 (56.3%) were preceded by AP; out of 242 noninvasive procedures, 14 (5.7%) were preceded by AP. A lack of uniformity on the type and dose of the antibiotic prescribed was observed. Four postoperative complications after invasive procedures (dental extraction) were noted and in 2 cases the procedures were preceded by AP.

Conclusion: This retrospective study showed no difference in postextraction outcomes between renal transplant recipients who received and who did not receive AP before dental extractions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/scd.12286DOI Listing
May 2018

Oral shedding of HSV-1 and EBV and oral manifestations in paediatric chronic kidney disease patients and renal transplant recipients.

Acta Odontol Scand 2018 Nov 6;76(8):539-544. Epub 2018 Feb 6.

a Department of Stomatology, Division of Oral Pathology, School of Dentistry , University of São Paulo , São Paulo , Brazil.

Objective: Previous research demonstrated that salivary shedding of HSV-1 and EBV occurs often in adult renal transplant recipients, but there is a lack of studies on the presence of them in the saliva of paediatric population. Therefore, the objective of this study is to describe oral characteristics and to compare the shedding profile of HSV-1 and EBV in the saliva of children with renal transplant to that of chronic kidney disease patients and controls.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study involving 100 children, being 25 renal transplant recipients, 25 chronic kidney disease patients and 50 healthy children. Demographic and oral clinical characteristics were assessed. Saliva samples were collected and submitted to screening for EBV and HSV-1 by using nested polymerase chain reaction technique. Fisher's exact, Pearson's chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for statistical analysis at a significance level of 5%.

Results: Oral shedding of HSV-1 (28%) and EBV (60%) were significantly higher in renal transplant recipients compared to the other groups. Single vesicles in the oral mucosa were statistically associated with the presence of HSV-1 (p = .035). In children with chronic kidney disease, there was a higher prevalence of pale oral mucosa (32%) and enamel hypoplasia (40%) compared to paediatric renal transplant recipients and controls. Dental calculus (36%), candidiasis (8%), drug-induced gingival overgrowth (16%), mouth blisters (8%), xerostomia (12%) and salivary gland enlargement (20%) were more common in paediatric renal transplant recipients.

Conclusions: Therefore, it can be concluded that salivary shedding of HSV-1 and EBV in paediatric patients was more often found in renal transplant recipients than in the renal failure and control children. Transplanted recipients showed more oral manifestations than renal failure and control children did.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016357.2018.1437218DOI Listing
November 2018

Magnetic resonance imaging appearance of foreign-body granulomatous reactions to dermal cosmetic fillers.

Imaging Sci Dent 2017 Dec 12;47(4):281-284. Epub 2017 Dec 12.

Division of General Pathology, Department of Stomatology, School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Foreign body granulomas can develop after the injection of various cosmetic filling materials into the facial area to flatten wrinkles. Clinically, reactive lesions are easily mistaken for soft-tissue neoplasms or cysts. This report presents a case of foreign body granuloma in a 52-year-old female patient complaining of a painless swelling in the nasolabial region. Both clinical and histological features are described, underscoring the diagnostic role of magnetic resonance imaging findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5624/isd.2017.47.4.281DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5738512PMC
December 2017

Oral shedding of human herpesviruses in renal transplant recipients.

Clin Oral Investig 2018 Mar 1;22(2):885-891. Epub 2017 Jul 1.

Division of Pathology, Department of Stomatology, University of São Paulo School of Dentistry, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitária, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Objective: To describe the shedding profile of human herpesviruses in the saliva of renal transplant recipients.

Methods: This is a prospective case-control study of 50 renal transplant recipients and control group of 50 individuals (non-transplanted and immunocompetent). Mouthwash samples were collected via oral rinse and then submitted to screening for the presence of eight types of herpesviruses by using multiplex PCR. Fisher's exact, chi-square, and Student t tests were used for statistical analysis, and the significance level was set at 5%.

Results: The mean age of the study group was 49.42 ± 12.94 years, 28/50 (56%) were female, and the time elapsed after transplantation was 68.20 ± 67.19 months. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) (P = 0.025) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (P = 0.024) were, statistically, more excreted in the saliva of renal transplant recipients compared to control group. Gender (P = 1.00) and age (P = 0.563) did not influence the salivary shedding of herpesviruses in renal transplant recipients. Individuals who excreted varicella-zoster virus in saliva had a shorter mean time of transplantation (22:00 + 2.82 months) (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: Renal transplant recipients excreted herpesviruses more often than controls, especially HSV-1 and EBV, with salivary shedding of herpesviruses being more frequent in patients with recent kidney transplantation.

Clinical Relevance: The present findings support other longitudinal studies evaluating the relationship between oral shedding of human herpesviruses and clinical presence of active infection and renal transplant failure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-017-2166-3DOI Listing
March 2018

A retrospective study of oral manifestations in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis.

Braz Dent J 2012 ;23(6):753-7

Department of Stomatology, Ribeirão Preto Dental School, USP - University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

South American blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis (Pb mycosis) or Lutz disease is an endemically fungal infection in Latin America. It is caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and may cause oral mucosal lesions. The incidence of Pb mycosis oral lesions was evaluated in patients assisted at a Brazilian Dental School's Specialized Oral Diagnosis Service with special focus on the different clinical forms of these lesions, its location, patients' occupation, deleterious habits, and diagnosis methodology. Students' and professionals' initial diagnoses were compared with the definitive diagnosis. Lesions were detected 31 cases (18 patients). The results show that 88.8% of the patients were male with a mean age of 50 years and 39% work(ed) with activities related to agriculture. As much as 88.9% were smokers and 72.2% were alcohol users. Exfoliative cytology was performed in 66.6% of the patients. Oral mucosa (30%), gingiva (16.6%) and lips 16.6% were the most common sites of Pb mycosis oral lesions. Comparing the initial with the definitive diagnosis made by the professionals their accuracy was 33% (6 out of 18 patients). Students' diagnosis was more accurate demonstrating 72.5% of initial correct diagnosis (13 out of 18). Statistical analysis by ANOVA (α=0.05, SPSS WIN) demonstrated a significant difference between the diagnosis of Pb mycosis made by students and professionals when considering initial diagnosis and final diagnosis (after histopathological analysis) (p=0.25). Incisional biopsy and exfoliate cytology are efficient for an early diagnosis of this disease in mouth. Students' training in diagnosis of oral pathologies to recognize lesions is urgent to improve public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0103-64402012000600021DOI Listing
January 2014