Publications by authors named "Rozita Edalat"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Molecular cloning of cDNA of mammalian and chicken II gonadotropin-releasing hormones (mGnRHs and cGnRH-II) in the beluga (Huso huso) and the disruptive effect of methylmercury on gene expression.

Fish Physiol Biochem 2010 Sep 11;36(3):803-817. Epub 2009 Oct 11.

Department of Fisheries, Faculty of Marine Natural Resources, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, Khorramshahr, Khouzestan, Iran.

Two gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) isoforms were identified in the beluga (Huso huso) brain by cDNA sequencing: prepro-mammalian GnRH (mGnRH) and prepro-chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II). The nucleotide sequences of the beluga mGnRH and cGnRH-II precursors are 273 and 258 base pairs (bp) long, encoding peptides of 91 and 86 amino acids, respectively. To investigate the effect of methylmercury (MeHg) on GnRH gene expression, animals were fed with four diets containing increasing levels of MeHg (0 mg kg(-1) [control]; 0.76 mg kg(-1) [low]; 7.8 mg kg(-1) [medium]; 16.22 mg kg(-1) [high]) for 32 days. The effects of MeHg on brain GnRH mRNA levels were evaluated by real-time PCR. A significant decrease in brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNA levels were detected in fish receiving high dietary MeHg dose compared to controls on day 11 (P < 0.05). On day 18 and 32, all treatment groups had significantly lower brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNA levels compared to the control group (P < 0.05). These findings demonstrate a disruptive role of MeHg on the level of brain mGnRH and cGnRH-II mRNAs in immature beluga.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10695-009-9356-0DOI Listing
September 2010

Occult hepatitis B virus infection in HIV-infected patients with isolated hepatitis B core antibody.

Intervirology 2008 7;51(4):270-4. Epub 2008 Oct 7.

Virology Department, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: Detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA without detectable hepatitis B surfaceantigen (HBsAg) is defined as occult HBV infection. In patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HBV, HIV interferes with the natural history of HBV infection by enhancing HBV replication, leading to more severe liver disease. The aim of this study was to assess occult HBV infection in Iranian HIV-positive patients with isolated hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc).

Methods: The presence of HBV-DNA was determined quantitatively in plasma samples of HIV-infected patients with isolated anti-HBc by real-time PCR using the artus HBV RG PCR kit on the Rotor-Gene 3000 real-time thermal cycler. Hepatitis C antibody (anti-HCV), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), HIV viral load and CD4+ count were also tested in all subjects.

Results: Of 106 patients enrolled in this study, 22 subjects (20.75%, 95% CI 13-28) had isolated anti-HBc. HBV-DNA was detectable in 3 of the 22 patients (13.6%, 95% CI 0.0-28) who had isolated anti-HBc.

Conclusion: A serological profile of isolated anti-HBc could be associated with occult HBV infection in Iranian HIV-infected patients. Therefore the risk of transmission of HBV is probable in these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000160217DOI Listing
December 2008

Frequency of hepatitis G virus infection among HIV positive subjects with parenteral and sexual exposure.

J Gastrointestin Liver Dis 2008 Sep;17(3):269-72

Clinical Research Department, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Epidemiological data indicate that Hepatitis G virus (HGV) is transmitted predominantly through parenteral routes, with a high seroprevalence among injection drug users (IDUs), although sexual transmission has also been reported. In this study our objective was to compare the frequency of HGV infection in two groups of HIV-positive patients including IDUs and those with sexual risk of exposure.

Methods: Presence of HGV-RNA was analyzed in serum samples from 82 HIV-infected patients including 52 IDUs and 30 cases with sexual (heterosexuals) risk of exposure by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), Hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs), Hepatitis C antibody (anti-HCV), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, HIV viral load and CD4 cells count were also tested in all subjects.

Results: The overall prevalence of HGV infection was 10.97% in HIV infected patients, with no statistically significant difference between the two groups (13.5% among IDUs vs. 6.7% among the sexual cases). We found a higher frequency of HGV co-infection with HCV in IDUs than in the sexual group (11.5% vs. 3.3%). There was no statistically significant difference between IDUs and the sexual group regarding age, viral load, CD4 cells count, ALT levels and the prevalence of HBV infection.

Conclusion: The overall prevalence of HGV infection was relatively high in HIV infected patients. HGV-RNA was found more frequently in patients with injection drug use than in those with sexual risk of exposure.
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September 2008

Frequency and genotype of GB virus C among Iranian patients infected with HIV.

J Med Virol 2008 Nov;80(11):1941-6

Hepatitis and AIDS Department, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran.

GB virus C (GBV-C) infection is frequent in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) due to similar transmission routes of these viruses. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of infection and genotypic characteristics of GBV-C in this population. The presence of GBV-C RNA was determined in serum samples of 106 patients infected with HIV by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction. GBV-C genotypes were determined by direct sequencing. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs), hepatitis C antibody (anti-HCV), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, HIV viral load and CD4(+) count were also tested in all patients. The overall prevalence of GBV-C infection was 11.3% in HIV patients. There was no significant difference between patients with and without GBV-C infection regarding age, sex, route of transmission, viral load, ALT levels, HBV and HCV co-infection and treatment with antiretroviral drugs. 66.7% of patients with GBV-C had a CD4(+) count > or = 200 and 33.3% had a CD4(+) count < 200 cells/mm(3). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all GBV-C isolates were genotype 2, and classified as subtype 2a. GBV-C infection is relatively common in patients infected with HIV. The prevailing GBV-C genotype 2a in this study group concurred with reports from other parts of the Middle East.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmv.21314DOI Listing
November 2008