Publications by authors named "Roymon Joseph"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Design Guidelines for Cationic Pillar[n]arenes that Prevent Biofilm Formation by Gram-Positive Pathogens.

ACS Infect Dis 2021 03 3;7(3):579-585. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

School of Chemistry, Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel.

Bacterial biofilms are a major threat to human health, causing persistent infections that lead to millions of fatalities worldwide every year. Biofilms also cause billions of dollars of damage annually by interfering with industrial processes. Recently, cationic pillararenes were found to be potent inhibitors of biofilm formation in Gram-positive bacteria. To identify the structural features of pillararenes that result in antibiofilm activity, we evaluated the activity of 16 cationic pillar[5]arene derivatives including that of the first cationic water-soluble pillar[5]arene-based rotaxane. Twelve of the derivatives were potent inhibitors of biofilm formation by Gram-positive pathogens. Structure activity analyses of our pillararene derivatives indicated that positively charged head groups are critical for the observed antibiofilm activity. Although certain changes in the lipophilicity of the substituents on the positively charged head groups are tolerated, dramatic elevation in the hydrophobicity of the substituents or an increase in steric bulk on these positive charges abolishes the antibiofilm activity. An increase in the overall positive charge from 10 to 20 did not affect the activity significantly, but pillararenes with 5 positive charges and 5 long alkyl chains had reduced activity. Surprisingly, the cavity of the pillar[n]arene is not essential for the observed activity, although the macrocyclic structure of the pillar[n]arene core, which facilitates the clustering of the positive charges, appears important. Interestingly, the compounds found to be efficient inhibitors of biofilm formation were nonhemolytic at concentrations that are ∼100-fold of their MBIC (the minimal concentration of a compound at which at least 50% inhibition of biofilm formation was observed compared to untreated cells). The structure-activity relationship guidelines established here pave the way for a rational design of potent cationic pillar[n]arene-based antibiofilm agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsinfecdis.0c00662DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8041275PMC
March 2021

Pillar[5]arene microcapsules turn on fluid flow in the presence of paraquat.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2020 Aug 14;56(65):9284-9287. Epub 2020 Jul 14.

Institute of Nano Science and Technology, Phase-10, Sector-64, Mohali, Punjab 160062, India.

We report the fabrication of pillar[5]arene (P[5]A) stabilized MCs via the self-assembly and crosslinking of P[5]A nanoaggregates at the liquid-liquid interface. These MC microengines turn on fluid flow in the presence of paraquat (PQ) due to "host-guest" molecular recognition. The microengines could be useful in designing non-mechanical micropumps, powerless microfluidics, and diagnostic devices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0cc04282jDOI Listing
August 2020

Selective Detection of Fe, F, and Cysteine by a Novel Triazole-Linked Decaamine Derivative of Pillar[5]arene and Its Metal Ion Complex in Water.

Authors:
Roymon Joseph

ACS Omega 2020 Mar 10;5(11):6215-6220. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

Department of Chemistry, University of Calicut, Calicut 673635, Kerala, India.

Appropriately functionalized pillar[]arenes are elegant supramolecular hosts for ion and molecule sensing. A water-soluble decaamine derivative of pillar[5]arene () bearing triazole and amide moieties is synthesized. The ion and molecular recognition properties of are studied by fluorescence, UV-visible, and H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The selectively detects Fe among 11 studied ions, which are important in several biological processes. Moreover, the in situ prepared Fe complex of () exhibits the highest responsiveness toward F (∼12-fold) among 11 anions and cysteine (∼120-fold) among the 20 naturally occurring amino acids by a fluorescence turn-on mechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.0c00595DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098014PMC
March 2020

Quinoline appended pillar[5]arene (QPA) as Fe sensor and complex of Fe (FeQPA) as a selective sensor for F, arginine and lysine in the aqueous medium.

Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc 2020 Jan 16;224:117390. Epub 2019 Jul 16.

Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IIST), Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695547, India.

A quinoline functionalized pillar[5]arene, QPA has been prepared and its interaction with biologically relevant ions and molecules in aqueous solution has been demonstrated. The sensor molecule, QPA has shown selectivity towards Fe among eleven metal ions studied. The Fe complex of QPA (FeQPA) selectively interacts with F among halides by ∼4 fold fluorescence enhancement. Further, FeQPA has shown selectivity towards arginine and lysine among twenty naturally occurring amino acids. The binding of QPA with Fe has been confirmed by MALDI-TOF and H NMR titrations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.saa.2019.117390DOI Listing
January 2020

High Exchange Rate Complexes of Xe with Water-Soluble Pillar[5]arenes for Adjustable Magnetization Transfer MRI.

Chemphyschem 2019 01 21;20(2):246-251. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Molecular Imaging, Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP), Robert-Rössle-Str. 10, 13125, Berlin, Germany.

Macrocyclic host structures for generating transiently bound Xe have been used in various ultra-sensitive NMR and MRI applications for molecular sensing of biochemical analytes. They are based on hyperpolarized nuclei chemical exchange saturation transfer (Hyper-CEST). Here, we tested a set of water-soluble pillar[5]arenes with different counterions in order to compare their potential contrast agent abilities with that of cryptophane-A (CrA), the most widely used host for such purposes. The exchange of Xe with such compounds was found to be sensitive to the type of ions present in solution and can be used for switchable magnetization transfer (MT) contrast that arises from off-resonant pre-saturation. We demonstrate that the adjustable MT magnitude depends on the interplay of saturation parameters and found that the optimum MT contrast surpasses the CrA CEST performance at moderate saturation power. Since modification of such water-soluble pillar[5]arenes is straightforward, these compounds can be considered a promising platform for designing various sensors that may complement the field of Xe HyperCEST-based biosensing MRI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cphc.201800618DOI Listing
January 2019

Phosphonium pillar[5]arenes as a new class of efficient biofilm inhibitors: importance of charge cooperativity and the pillar platform.

Chem Commun (Camb) 2016 Aug;52(70):10656-9

School of Chemistry, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel.

Biofilm formation, which frequently occurs in microbial infections and often reduces the efficacy of antibiotics, also perturbs many industrial and domestic processes. We found that a new class of water soluble pillar[5]arenes bearing phosphonium moieties (1, 2) and their respective ammonium analogues (3, 4) inhibit biofilm formation with IC50 values in the range of 0.67-1.66 μM. These compounds have no antimicrobial activity, do not damage red blood cell membranes, and do not affect mammalian cell viability in culture. Comparison of the antibiofilm activities of the phosphonium-decorated pillar[5]arene derivatives 1 and 2 with their respective ammonium counterparts 3 and 4 and their monomers 5 and 6, demonstrate that while positive charges, charge cooperativity and the pillararene platform are essential for the observed antibiofilm activity the nature of the charges is not.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6cc05170gDOI Listing
August 2016

Cationic Pillararenes Potently Inhibit Biofilm Formation without Affecting Bacterial Growth and Viability.

J Am Chem Soc 2016 Jan 14;138(3):754-7. Epub 2016 Jan 14.

School of Chemistry, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University , Tel Aviv 69978, Israel.

It is estimated that up to 80% of bacterial infections are accompanied by biofilm formation. Since bacteria in biofilms are less susceptible to antibiotics than are bacteria in the planktonic state, biofilm-associated infections pose a major health threat, and there is a pressing need for antibiofilm agents. Here we report that water-soluble cationic pillararenes differing in the quaternary ammonium groups efficiently inhibited the formation of biofilms by clinically important Gram-positive pathogens. Biofilm inhibition did not result from antimicrobial activity; thus, the compounds should not inhibit growth of natural bacterial flora. Moreover, none of the cationic pillararenes caused detectable membrane damage to red blood cells or toxicity to human cells in culture. The results indicate that cationic pillararenes have potential for use in medical applications in which biofilm formation is a problem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jacs.5b11834DOI Listing
January 2016

Stabilization of cucurbituril/guest assemblies via long-range Coulombic and CH···O interactions.

J Am Chem Soc 2014 May 25;136(18):6602-7. Epub 2014 Apr 25.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University , Athens, Ohio 45701, United States.

Cucurbit[n]urils (CB[n], n = 6-8) interact strongly with metal-bound 4'-substituted terpyridine ligands (M = Fe(II) and Ir(III)) via CH···O hydrogen bonding, despite significant separation between the positive metallic cation and the carbonylated rim of CB[n], and the location of the latter in the second coordination sphere of the metal ion. While water has been shown to mediate interactions between cations and CB[n]s in some assemblies, mediation by organic ligands is unprecedented. The recognition process is driven by the contrasted combination of extremely favorable binding enthalpies (up to 20.2 kcal/mol) and very unfavorable entropic components (as low as -10.2 kcal/mol). Dynamic oligomers were prepared in the presence of CB[8], which acts as a "soft", noncovalent linker between metal/terpyridine complexes, and interconnects two 4'-substituents inside its cavity. Social self-sorting between CB[8] and metal/terpyridine complexes bearing 4'-(2-naphthyl) and 4'-(2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl) substituents was also observed, and could afford well-organized oligomers with alternating Fe(II) and Ir(III) cations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja4092165DOI Listing
May 2014

Subtle "supramolecular buttressing effects" in Cucurbit[7]uril/guest assemblies.

Org Biomol Chem 2013 May 4;11(19):3116-27. Epub 2013 Apr 4.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701, USA.

Biphenyl derivatives bearing a dimethylsulfonium group at position 3 and three different substituents at position 4 (H, F and CH3) have been prepared as probes to test the validity of the "supramolecular buttressing" concept. We define the latter as the alteration, by a neighboring unit, of a substituent effect on intermolecular recognition. In this case, the 4-substituents exert some pressure on the 3-dimethylsulfonium groups and control the ratio of their syn and anti conformations. As free species, biphenyls bearing 4-H and 4-F substituents are present as approximately equimolar mixtures of syn and anti-conformers, while the biphenyl scaffold with a 4-CH3 group adopts the anti-conformation exclusively. The 3-dimethylsulfonium substituents then interact with one of the carbonylated portals of Cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]), and their conformations affect the position of the guests inside the cavity of the macrocycle, thereby validating our "supramolecular buttressing" model. Surprisingly however, binding affinities towards CB[7] are barely affected by the nature of the 4-substituents and the conformations of the neighboring sulfonium groups, despite very different electronic densities presented to the CB[7] portal in their syn or anti conformations. Solvation was found to dramatically smoothen host-guest Columbic interactions, although the latter remain important in the recognition process. Replacing the positively charged 3-dimethylsulfonium unit with an isopropyl substituent decreases the affinity of the biphenyl guest by 1000-fold.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c3ob40250aDOI Listing
May 2013

Calix[4]arene-based 1,3-diconjugate of salicylyl imine having dibenzyl amine moiety (L): synthesis, characterization, receptor properties toward Fe2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+, crystal structures of its Zn2+ and Cu2+ complexes, and selective phosphate sensing by the [ZnL].

Inorg Chem 2011 Aug 1;50(15):7050-8. Epub 2011 Jul 1.

Bioinorganic Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076, India.

A calix[4]arene conjugate bearing salicylyl imine having dibenzyl moiety (L) has been synthesized and characterized, and its ability to recognize three most important essential elements of human system, viz., iron, copper, and zinc, has been addressed by colorimetry and fluorescence techniques. L acts as a sensor for Cu(2+) and Fe(2+) by exhibiting visual color change and for Zn(2+) based on fluorescence spectroscopy. L shows a minimum detection limit of 3.96 ± 0.42 and 4.51 ± 0.53 ppm and 45 ± 4 ppb, respectively, toward Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+). The in situ prepared [ZnL] exhibits phosphate sensing among 14 anions studied with a detection limit of 247 ± 25 ppb. The complexes of Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(2+) of L have been synthesized and characterized by different techniques. The crystalline nature of the zinc and copper complexes and the noncrystalline nature of simple L and its iron complex have been demonstrated by powder XRD. The structures of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) complexes have been established by single crystal XRD wherein these were found to be 1:1 monomeric and 2:2 dimeric, respectively, using N(2)O(2) as binding core. The geometries exhibited by the Zn(2+) and the Cu(2+) complexes were found to be distorted tetrahedral and distorted square planar, respectively. The iron complex of L exists in 1:1 stoichiometry as evident from the mass spectrometry and elemental analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ic200544aDOI Listing
August 2011

Ion and molecular recognition by lower rim 1,3-di-conjugates of calix[4]arene as receptors.

Chem Rev 2011 Aug 22;111(8):4658-702. Epub 2011 Apr 22.

Bioinorganic Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Mumbai 400 076, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr1004524DOI Listing
August 2011

Lower rim 1,3-diderivative of calix[4]arene-appended salicylidene imine (H(2)L): experimental and computational studies of the selective recognition of H(2)L toward Zn(2+) and sensing phosphate and amino acid by [ZnL].

J Org Chem 2010 May;75(10):3387-95

Bioinorganic Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076, India.

A new 1,3-diderivative of calix[4]arene appended with hydroxymethyl salicylyl imine has been synthesized and its ion recognition toward biologically relevant M(n+) ions studied. The receptor H(2)L showed selectivity toward Zn(2+) by switch-on fluorescence among the 12 metal ions studied with a detection limit of 192 ppb. The interaction of Zn(2+) with H(2)L has been further supported by absorption studies, and the stoichiometry of the complex formed (1:1) has been established on the basis of absorption and ESI MS. Competitive ion titrations carried out reveal that the Zn(2+) can be detected even in the presence of other metal ions of bioimportance. The mode of interaction of Zn(2+) with conjugate has been established by a fleet of computational calculations carried out in a cascade manner, either on the ligand or on the complex, wherein the final optimizations were carried out by the density functional theory (DFT) and found that the Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) indeed bind differently. In situ prepared [ZnL] complex responds to both inorganic phosphate as well as AMP, ADP, and ATP with a minimum detection limit of 426 ppb wherein the Zn(2+) from the complex is detached and recomplexed by the added phosphate moiety. It has been possible to build an INHIBIT logic gate for the conjugate using Zn(2+) and HPO(4)(2-) as inputs by monitoring the fluorescence emission band at 444 nm as output. The amino acid sensing abilities of [ZnL] have been explored by fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy where it showed selectivity toward Cys, Asp, and His through the formation of the Zn(2+) complex of these amino acids by chelating through their side chain moieties. Thus, while H(2)L is selective for Zn(2+) among a number of cations, the [ZnL] is selective toward phosphate among a number of anions and also toward Asp, Cys, and His among the naturally occurring amino acids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo1004247DOI Listing
May 2010

Lower rim 1,3-di{bis(2-picolyl)}amide derivative of calix[4]arene (l) as ratiometric primary sensor toward Ag+ and the complex of Ag+ as secondary sensor toward Cys: experimental, computational, and microscopy studies and INHIBIT logic gate properties of L.

J Org Chem 2009 Nov;74(21):8181-90

Bioinorganic Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076, India.

A structurally characterized lower rim 1,3-di{bis(2-picolyl)}amide derivative of calix[4]arene (L) exhibits high selectivity toward Ag(+) by forming a 1:1 complex, among nine other biologically important metal ions, viz., Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), as studied by fluorescence, absorption, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The 1:1 complex formed between L and Ag(+) has been further proven on the basis of ESI mass spectrometry and has been shown to have an association constant, K(a), of 11,117 +/- 190 M(-1) based on fluorescence data. L acts as a primary ratiometric sensor toward Ag(+) by switch-on fluorescence and exhibits a lowest detectable concentration of 450 ppb. DFT computational studies carried out in mimicking the formation of a 1:1 complex between L and Ag(+) resulted in a tetrahedral complex wherein the nitrogens of all four pyridyl moieties present on both arms are being coordinated. Whereas these pyridyls are located farther apart in the crystal structure, appropriate dihedral changes are induced in the arms in the presence of silver ion in order to form a coordination complex. Even the nanostructural features obtained in TEM clearly differentiates L from its Ag(+) complex. The in situ prepared silver complex of L detects Cys ratiometrically among the naturally occurring amino acids to a lowest concentration of 514 ppb by releasing L from the complex followed by formation of the cysteine complex of Ag(+). These were demonstrated on the basis of emission, absorption, (1)H NMR, and ESI mass spectra. The INH logic gate has also been generated by choosing Ag(+) and Cys as input and by monitoring the output signal at 445 nm that originates from the excimer emission of L in the presence of Ag(+). Thus L is a potential primary sensor toward Ag(+) and is a secondary sensor toward Cys.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo901676sDOI Listing
November 2009

Experimental and computational studies of selective recognition of Hg2+ by amide linked lower rim 1,3-dibenzimidazole derivative of calix[4]arene: species characterization in solution and that in the isolated complex, including the delineation of the nanostructures.

J Org Chem 2008 Aug 1;73(15):5745-58. Epub 2008 Jul 1.

Department of Chemistry Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076, India.

Amide linked lower rim 1,3-dibenzimidazole derivative of calix[4]arene, L has been shown to be sensitive and selective to Hg(2+) in aqueous acetonitrile solution based on fluorescence spectroscopy, and the stoichiometry of the complexed species has been found to be 1:1. The selectivity of L toward Hg(2+) has been shown among 11 M(2+) ions, viz., Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) studied, including those of the mercury group and none of these ions impede the recognition of Hg(2+) by L. Role of the solvent on the recognition of Hg(2+) has been demonstrated. The role of calix[4]arene platform and the benzimidazole moieties in the recognition of Hg(2+) by L has been delineated upon performing such studies with five different molecules of relevance as reference molecular systems. The binding cores formed by the receptor L and the reference compounds have been established based on the single crystal XRD structures, and the preferential metal ion binding cores have been discussed. The binding of Hg(2+) with L has been further established based on (1)H and (13)C NMR, ESI MS, absorption, and fluorescence lifetime measurements. Some of these techniques have been used to establish the stoichiometry of the species formed. The complex species formed between L and Hg(2+) have been isolated and characterized and found to be 1:1 species even in the isolated complex. Whereas transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provided the nanostructural behavior of L, the TEM and SEM demonstrated that the mercury complex has different characteristics when compared to L. The TEM, SEM, and powder XRD studies revealed that whereas L is crystalline, that of the mercury complex is not, perhaps a reason for not being able to obtain single crystals of the complex. Binding characteristics of Hg(2+) toward L have been established based on the DFT computational calculations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jo800073gDOI Listing
August 2008