Publications by authors named "Ross C Klingsberg"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

CFTR modulator therapy improves cystic fibrosis-related diabetes. But how?

J Diabetes Complications 2021 Jun 25;35(6):107887. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Tulane University School of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Diseases, Critical Care and Environmental Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States of America; Tulane University School of Medicine, John W. Deming Department of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States of America; Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System, New Orleans, LA, United States of America. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2021.107887DOI Listing
June 2021

Tezacaftor/ivacaftor in people with cystic fibrosis who stopped lumacaftor/ivacaftor due to respiratory adverse events.

J Cyst Fibros 2021 Mar 23;20(2):228-233. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Increased rates of respiratory adverse events have been observed in people ≥12 years of age with cystic fibrosis homozygous for the Phe508del-CFTR mutation treated with lumacaftor/ivacaftor, particularly in those with percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (ppFEV) of <40%. We evaluated the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of tezacaftor/ivacaftor in people with cystic fibrosis homozygous for Phe508del-CFTR who discontinued lumacaftor/ivacaftor due to treatment-related respiratory signs or symptoms.

Methods: Participants ≥12 years of age with cystic fibrosis homozygous for Phe508del-CFTR with ppFEV of ≥25% and ≤90% were randomized 1:1 and treated with tezacaftor/ivacaftor or placebo for 56 days.

Results: Of 97 participants, 94 (96.9%) completed the study. The primary endpoint was incidence of predefined respiratory adverse events of special interest (chest discomfort, dyspnea, respiration abnormal, asthma, bronchial hyperreactivity, bronchospasm, and wheezing): tezacaftor/ivacaftor, 14.0%; placebo, 21.3%. The adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. None were serious or led to treatment interruption or discontinuation. Overall, the discontinuation rate was similar between groups. The mean (SD) ppFEV at baseline was 44.6% (16.1%) with tezacaftor/ivacaftor and 48.0% (18.1%) with placebo. The posterior mean difference in absolute change in ppFEV from baseline to the average value of days 28 and 56 was 2.7 percentage points with tezacaftor/ivacaftor vs placebo.

Conclusions: Tezacaftor/ivacaftor was generally safe, well tolerated, and efficacious in people ≥12 years of age with cystic fibrosis homozygous for Phe508del-CFTR with ppFEV of ≥25% and ≤90% who previously discontinued lumacaftor/ivacaftor due to treatment-related respiratory signs or symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcf.2020.06.001DOI Listing
March 2021

A 45-Year-Old Woman With 3 Weeks of Cough and Night Sweats.

Chest 2016 Mar;149(3):e87-90

Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA.

A 45-year-old woman who received a renal transplant 7 years prior presented with a 3-week history of low-grade fever, night sweats, and a dry cough with scant sputum production. Additionally, she reported generalized weakness and increased fatigability. She denied hemoptysis or weight loss, and there had been no change in medication or foreign travel. She had no history of latent tuberculosis or sick contacts. She had recently relocated to Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She was sexually active with her boyfriend who worked as a prison guard. She also reported that she was briefly incarcerated 7 years ago shortly after her renal transplantation. Her immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and prednisone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2015.08.014DOI Listing
March 2016

The Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 1 and transforming growth factor--β1 synergistically induce epithelial--mesenchymal transition in lung epithelial cells.

Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2011 Jun 6;44(6):852-62. Epub 2010 Aug 6.

Department of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary Diseases, Critical Care and Environmental Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

The histopathology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) includes the presence of myofibroblasts within so-called fibroblastic foci, and studies suggest that lung myofibroblasts may be derived from epithelial cells through epithelial--mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is expressed and/or activated in fibrogenesis, and induces EMT in lung epithelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. A higher occurrence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been reported in the lung tissue of patients with IPF. EBV expresses latent membrane protein (LMP) 1 during the latent phase of infection, and may play a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis inasmuch as LMP-1 may act as a constitutively active TNF-α receptor. Our data show a remarkable increase in mesenchymal cell markers, along with a concurrent reduction in the expression of epithelial cell markers in lung epithelial cells cotreated with LMP-1, and very low doses of TGF-β1. This effect was mirrored in lung epithelial cells infected with EBV expressing LMP1 and cotreated with TGF-β1. LMP1 pro-EMT signaling was identified, and occurs primarily through the nuclear factor-κB pathway and secondarily through the extracellular signal--regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Activation of the ERK pathway was shown to be critical for aspects of TGF-β1-induced EMT. LMP1 accentuates the TGF-β1 activation of ERK. Together, these data demonstrate that the presence of EBV-LMP1 in lung epithelial cells synergizes with TGF-β1 to induce EMT. Our in vitro data may help to explain the observation that patients with IPF demonstrating positive staining for LMP1 in lung epithelial cells have a more rapid demise than patients in whom LMP1 is not detected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2009-0232OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3135845PMC
June 2011

Current clinical trials for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Respirology 2010 Jan;15(1):19-31

Section of Pulmonary Diseases, Tulane University School of Medical, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA.

Most pulmonary consultants are called upon to discuss IPF management with their patients. The gravity of IPF treatment discussion is immense in view of the data that 3- and 5-year mortality rates are approximately 50% and 80%, respectively. Although IPF occurs in older patients with comorbid diseases, most patients with IPF die as a direct consequence of their lung fibrosis. Here, the results of recently completed IPF trials and the rationale for ongoing studies are succinctly reviewed. There are a number of novel agents in clinical trials that are in the earlier stages of development, and there is new evidence supporting palliative therapies, which may help in managing symptoms of IPF, such as cough, without necessarily altering the course of the disease. The information provided herein should facilitate informed physician-patient dialogue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1843.2009.01672.xDOI Listing
January 2010

Abrogation of TGF-beta1-induced fibroblast-myofibroblast differentiation by histone deacetylase inhibition.

Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 2009 Nov 21;297(5):L864-70. Epub 2009 Aug 21.

Biomedical Sciences Program, 1430 Tulane Ave. SL-9, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease with no known effective pharmacological therapy. The fibroblastic foci of IPF contain activated myofibroblasts that are the major synthesizers of type I collagen. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 promotes differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. In the current study, we investigated the molecular link between TGF-beta1-mediated myofibroblast differentiation and histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. Treatment of normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLFs) with the pan-HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) inhibited TGF-beta1-mediated alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) and alpha1 type I collagen mRNA induction. TSA also blocked the TGF-beta1-driven contractile response in NHLFs. The inhibition of alpha-SMA expression by TSA was associated with reduced phosphorylation of Akt, and a pharmacological inhibitor of Akt blocked TGF-beta1-mediated alpha-SMA induction in a dose-dependent manner. HDAC4 knockdown was effective in inhibiting TGF-beta1-stimulated alpha-SMA expression as well as the phosphorylation of Akt. Moreover, the inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A and 1 (PP2A and PP1) rescued the TGF-beta1-mediated alpha-SMA induction from the inhibitory effect of TSA. Together, these data demonstrate that the differentiation of NHLFs to myofibroblasts is HDAC4 dependent and requires phosphorylation of Akt.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajplung.00128.2009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2777501PMC
November 2009

Requirement of HDAC6 for transforming growth factor-beta1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

J Biol Chem 2008 Jul 21;283(30):21065-73. Epub 2008 May 21.

Department of Medicine and Tulane Cancer Center, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, 1430 Tulane Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

The aberrant expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 in the tumor microenvironment and fibrotic lesions plays a critical role in tumor progression and tissue fibrosis by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT promotes tumor cell motility and invasiveness. How EMT affects motility and invasion is not well understood. Here we report that HDAC6 is a novel modulator of TGF-beta1-induced EMT. HDAC6 is a microtubule-associated deacetylase that predominantly deacetylates nonhistone proteins, including alpha-tubulin, and regulates cell motility. We showed that TGF-beta1-induced EMT is accompanied by HDAC6-dependent deacetylation of alpha-tubulin. Importantly, inhibition of HDAC6 by small interfering RNA or the small molecule inhibitor tubacin attenuated the TGF-beta1-induced EMT markers, such as the aberrant expression of epithelial and mesenchymal peptides, as well as the formation of stress fibers. Reduced expression of HDAC6 also impaired the activation of SMAD3 in response to TGF-beta1. Conversely, inhibition of SMAD3 activation substantially impaired HDAC6-dependent deacetylation of alpha-tubulin as well as the expression of EMT markers. These findings reveal a novel function of HDAC6 in EMT by intercepting the TGF-beta-SMAD3 signaling cascade. Our results identify HDAC6 as a critical regulator of EMT and a potential therapeutic target against pathological EMT, a key event for tumor progression and fibrogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M802786200DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2475688PMC
July 2008