Publications by authors named "Rosnani Hasham"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A review on extraction techniques and therapeutic value of polar bioactives from Asian medicinal herbs: Case study on and .

Saudi Pharm J 2021 Feb 7;29(2):143-165. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Institute of Bioproduct Development, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia.

Medicinal plants have gained much interest in the prevention and treatment of common human disease such as cold and fever, hypertension and postpartum. Bioactive compounds from medicinal plants were synthesised using effective extraction methods which have important roles in the pharmaceutical product development. (OA), (EL) and (AP) are among popular medicinal herbs in Southeast Asia. The major compounds for these medicinal plants are polar bioactive compounds (rosmarinic acid, eurycomanone and andrographolide) which have multiple benefits to human health. The bioactive compounds are used as a drug to function against a variety of diseases with the support of scientific evidence. This paper was intended to prepare a complete review about the extraction techniques (e.g. OA, EL and AP) of these medicinal plants based on existing studies and scientific works. Suitable solvents and techniques to obtain their major bioactive compounds and their therapeutic potentials were discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsps.2020.12.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7910186PMC
February 2021

Development of Biodegradable Cosmetic Patch Using a Polylactic Acid/Phycocyanin-Alginate Composite.

Polymers (Basel) 2020 Jul 27;12(8). Epub 2020 Jul 27.

Institute of Bioproduct Development, University Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru 81310, Johor, Malaysia.

The usage of non-degradable polymer as the main matrix for a cosmetic patch raises concern, as it can cause environmental pollution when discarded in landfill. Thus, biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) was chosen in this study, as PLA has non-toxic properties and similar mechanical properties to conventional plastic materials. An active ingredient in a cosmetic patch serves the purpose of providing beneficial ingredients to the skin; therefore, phycocyanin, an extract from spirulina, was chosen, as it possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Alginate was also incorporated with the phycocyanin for fabrication onto the PLA matrix. A preliminary study was first carried out to identify the antioxidant properties and cytotoxic effect of the phycocyanin on skin cells. It was observed that phycocyanin had no cytotoxic effect on the skin and showed good antioxidant activity. PLA/phycocyanin-alginate composite was fabricated using a solvent casting method, and optimization of preparation conditions (phycocyanin/alginate ratio, stirring time, and temperature) were carried out using the one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) method with responses of elongation at break and releasing properties. Attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-FTIR analysis was also conducted to further analyze the functional group of the composites. Surface morphologies were observed for samples before and after the releasing test. From the analyses conducted, PLA/phycocyanin-alginate composite prepared at a phycocyanin/alginate ratio of 40/60 for 20 h at 20 °C gave the best properties in terms of flexibility of film and releasing properties of phycocyanin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym12081669DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7463478PMC
July 2020

Assessment of non-invasive techniques and herbal-based products on dermatological physiology and intercellular lipid properties.

Heliyon 2020 May 25;6(5):e03955. Epub 2020 May 25.

Institute of Bioproduct Development, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia.

Skin is the largest external organ of the human body. It acts as a barrier to protect the human body from environmental pollution, mechanical stress, and excessive water loss. The defensive function resides primarily on top of the epidermis layer commonly known as stratum corneum (SC). Human SC consists of three major lipids, namely ceramide, free fatty acid, and cholesterol that comprise approximately 50%, 25%, and 25% of the total lipid mass, respectively. The optimal composition of SC lipids is the vital epidermal barrier function of the skin. On the other hand, skin barrier serves to limit passive water loss from the body, reduces chemical absorption from the environment, and prevents microbial infection. In contrast, epidermal lipids are important to maintain the cell structure, growth and differentiation, cohesion and desquamation as well as formation of a permeability barrier. Multiple non-invasive approaches were implemented on a regular basis to monitor skin physiological and intercellular lipid properties. The measurement of different parameters such as transepidermal water loss (TEWL), hydration level, skin elasticity, collagen intensity, melanin content, sebum, pH, and tape stripping is essential to evaluate the epidermal barrier function. Novel non-invasive techniques such as tape stripping, ultrasound imaging, and laser confocal microscopy offer higher possibility of accurate and detailed characterisation of skin barrier. To date, these techniques have also been widely used to determine the effects of herbal plants in dermatology. Herbal plants have been traditionally used for ages to treat a variety of skin diseases, as reported by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Their availability, lower cost, and minimal or no side effects have created awareness among society, thus increase the demand for natural sources as the remedy to treat various skin diseases. This paper reviews several non-invasive techniques and evaluations of herbal-based product in dermatology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2020.e03955DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7251381PMC
May 2020

Characterization and antiinflammatory properties of fractionated pyroligneous acid from palm kernel shell.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020 May 16. Epub 2020 May 16.

School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia.

Pyroligneous acid (PA) obtained from slow pyrolysis of palm kernel shell (PKS) has high total phenolic contents and exhibits various biological activities including antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal. In this study, PA obtained using slow pyrolysis method and fractionated using column chromatography was characterized (chemical and antioxidative properties) and investigated for its cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibition activities using the in vitro and in silico approaches. The F PA fraction exhibited highest total phenolic content of 181.75 ± 17.0 μg/mL. Fraction F showed ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) (331.80 ± 4.60 mg TE/g) and IC of 18.56 ± 0.01 μg/mL towards COX-2 and 5.25 ± 0.03 μg/mL towards the 5-LOX enzymes, respectively. Molecular docking analysis suggested favourable binding energy for all chemical compounds present in fraction F, notably 1-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)-2-pentanone, towards both COX-2 (- 6.9 kcal/mol) and 5-LOX (- 6.4 kcal/mol) enzymes. As a conclusion, PA from PKS has the potential to be used as an alternative antioxidant and antiinflammatory agents which is biodegradable and a more sustainable supply of raw materials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-09209-xDOI Listing
May 2020

Optimization of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction Conditions Followed by Solid Phase Extraction Fractionation from Leaves for Antiproliferative Effect on Prostate Cancer Cells.

Molecules 2019 Nov 18;24(22). Epub 2019 Nov 18.

Institute of Marine Biotechnology, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia.

Primarily, optimization of ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions of was evaluated and verified using a central composite design (CCD) based on three factors including extraction time (minutes), ultrasound amplitude (A), and solvent concentration (%). The response surface methodology (RSM) was performed to develop an extraction method with maximum yield and high rosmarinic acid content. The optimal UAE conditions were as follows: extraction time 21 min, ultrasound amplitudes 62 A, and solvent composition 70% ethanol in water. The crude extract was further fractionated using solid-phase extraction (SPE), where six sequential fractions that varied in polarity (0-100% Acetonitrile in water) were obtained. Next, the six fractions were evaluated for their antioxidant and anti-cancer properties. This study found that Fraction 2 (F2) contained the highest rosmarinic acid content and showed the strongest antioxidant activity. Additionally, F2 showed an anti-proliferative effect against prostate cancer (DU145) with no harmful effect on normal cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules24224183DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6891422PMC
November 2019

Empty nano and micro-structured lipid carriers of virgin coconut oil for skin moisturisation.

IET Nanobiotechnol 2016 Aug;10(4):195-9

Institute of Bioproduct Development, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia International Campus, Jalan Semarak, 54100 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan, Malaysia.

Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is the finest grade of coconut oil, rich in phenolic content, antioxidant activity and contains medium chain triglycerides (MCTs). In this work formulation, characterisation and penetration of VCO-solid lipid particles (VCO-SLP) have been studied. VCO-SLP were prepared using ultrasonication of molten stearic acid and VCO in an aqueous solution. The electron microscopy imaging revealed that VCO-SLP were solid and spherical in shape. Ultrasonication was performed at several power intensities which resulted in particle sizes of VCO-SLP ranged from 0.608 ± 0.002 µm to 44.265 ± 1.870 µm. The particle size was directly proportional to the applied power intensity of ultrasonication. The zeta potential values of the particles were from -43.2 ± 0.28 mV to -47.5 ± 0.42 mV showing good stability. The cumulative permeation for the smallest sized VCO-SLP (0.608 µm) was 3.83 ± 0.01 µg/cm(2) whereas for larger carriers it was reduced (3.59 ± 0.02 µg/cm(2)). It is concluded that SLP have the potential to be exploited as a micro/nano scale cosmeceutical carrying vehicle for improved dermal delivery of VCO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1049/iet-nbt.2015.0041DOI Listing
August 2016

A long-standing hyperglycaemic condition impairs skin barrier by accelerating skin ageing process.

Exp Dermatol 2011 Dec 20;20(12):969-74. Epub 2011 Oct 20.

Department of Dermatology, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea.

Uncontrolled chronic hyperglycaemia including type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) induces many skin problems related to chronic impaired skin barrier state. However, little is known about the skin barrier state of chronic hyperglycaemia patients, the dysfunction of which may be a major cause of their skin problems. In this study, we investigated whether a long-standing hyperglycaemic condition including type 2 DM impairs skin barrier homoeostasis in proportion to the duration and its pathomechanism. We utilized the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats as an animal model of long-standing hyperglycaemia and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats as a control strain. We confirmed that a long-standing hyperglycaemia delayed skin barrier homoeostasis, which correlated with haemoglobin A1c levels. OLETF rats as a long-standing hyperglycaemia model exhibited decreased epidermal lipid synthesis and antimicrobial peptide expression with increasing age. Decreased epidermal lipid synthesis accounted for decreased lamellar body production. In addition, OLETF rats had significantly higher serum levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and elevated levels of the receptor for AGE in the epidermis. A long-standing hyperglycaemic condition impairs skin barrier function including permeability and antimicrobial barriers by accelerating skin ageing process in proportion to the duration of hyperglycaemia, which could be a major pathophysiology underlying cutaneous complications of DM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0625.2011.01364.xDOI Listing
December 2011