Publications by authors named "Rose-Marie Hamladji"

23 Publications

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Successful Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in 4 Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Patients.

J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2021 Apr 6. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Department, Pierre and Marie Curie Center, Algiers, Algeria.

Background: Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potential curative treatment in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS). Here, we analyzed the outcomes in 4 WAS patients who underwent this procedure with peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) in our center.

Patients And Methods: Four patients with severe WAS phenotype have received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between January 2014 and December 2019 from matched sibling donors with PBSC. Two different preparative conditioning regimens were provided: the first associated busulfan-cyclophosphamide (2 patients) and the second with busulfan-fludarabine administered to the others. Cyclosporine gave as preferred graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis with a short course of methotrexate.

Results: All patients achieved engraftment after PBSC with a median CD34+ cell count: 13.6×106/kg (8 to 24.9×106/kg). Chronic graft-versus-host disease developed in 2 patients treated by cyclosporine-steroids with complete resolution. Chimerism for all the patients was fully donor (>95% donor). After a median follow-up of 41 months (8 to 74 mo), all patients (100%) are alive, healthy, with complete clinical, immunologic, and hematologic recovery, without signs of WAS.

Conclusion: This limited study with high-dose PBSC transplantation approach for WAS, demonstrated a safe and effective treatment option, with rapid engraftment, without complications, excellent long-term outcomes, independent of conditioning regimen.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MPH.0000000000002154DOI Listing
April 2021

Outcome of haploidentical versus matched sibling donors in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a study from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

J Hematol Oncol 2021 Apr 1;14(1):53. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Department of Haematology, Saint Antoine Hospital, INSERM UMR 938, Sorbonne University, Paris, France.

Background: Non-T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HaploSCT) is being increasingly used in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with improving patient outcomes. We have recently reported that outcomes of adult patients (pts) with ALL in complete remission (CR) receiving HaploSCT are comparable to unrelated donor transplants. We now compared HaploSCT and matched sibling donor (MSD) transplants in pts with ALL.

Aim: To assess transplantation outcomes of HaploSCT and MSD transplants in pts with ALL in CR.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed adult patients (≥ 18 years) with ALL who underwent their first allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) in first or second CR between 2012 and 2018, either from a T cell replete Haplo or MSD donor, and whose data were reported to the Acute Leukemia Working Party (ALWP) of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT). Multivariate analysis (MVA) adjusting for differences between the groups was performed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Propensity score matching was also performed to reduce confounding effects.

Results: The analysis comprised 2304 patients: HaploSCT-413; MSD-1891. Median follow-up was 25 months. Median age was 37 (range 18-75) and 38 (18-76) years in HaploSCT and MSD, respectively. HaploSCT patients were transplanted more recently than those transplanted from MSD (2016 vs 2015, p < 0.0001). A higher rate of HaploSCT was in CR2 (33.4% vs 16.7%, p < 0.0001), respectively, and fewer received myeloablative conditioning (68% vs 83.2%, p < 0.0001). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositivity was lower in HaploSCT patients (22% vs 28%, p = 0.01) and donors (27.1% vs 33%, p < 0.02), and a higher proportion of the HaploSCTs were performed using a bone marrow (BM) graft (46.2% vs 18.6%, p < 0.0001). The 2 groups did not differ with regard to gender, Karnofsky performance status score, ALL phenotype, Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) positivity and pre-alloSCT measurable residual disease (MRD). Graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was mainly post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCy) based (92.7%) in the HaploSCT setting, while it was mostly pharmacologic in the setting of MSD (18.7% received ATG). Cumulative incidence of engraftment at day 60 was higher in MSD transplants compared to HaploSCT (98.7% vs 96.3%, p = 0.001), respectively. Day 180 incidence of acute (a) GVHD II-IV and III-IV was higher in HaploSCT vs. MSD: 36.3% vs 28.9% (p = 0.002 and 15.2% vs 10.5% (p = 0.005), respectively. Conversely, the 2-year chronic (c) GVHD and extensive cGVHD were 32% vs 38.8% (p = 0.009) and 11.9% vs 19.5% (p = 0.001) in HaploSCT vs MSD, respectively. Main causes of death were leukemia (31.8% vs 45%), infection (33.1% vs 19.7%) and GVHD (16.6% vs 19.7%) for HaploSCT and MSD, respectively. Two-year relapse incidence (RI), non-relapse mortality (NRM), leukemia-free survival (LFS), overall survival (OS) and GVHD-free, relapse-free survival (GRFS) were 26% vs 31.6%, 22.9% vs 13%, 51% vs 55.4%, 58.8% vs 67.4% and 40.6% vs 39% for HaploSCT and MSD, respectively. In the MVA, RI was significantly lower in HaploSCT in comparison with MSD, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.66 (95% CI 0.52-0.83, p = 0.004), while NRM was significantly higher, HR = 1.9 (95% CI 1.43-2.53, p < 0.0001). aGVHD grade II-IV and grade III-IV were higher in HaploSCT than in MSD HR = 1.53 (95% CI 1.23-1.9, p = 0.0002) and HR = 1.54 (95% CI 1.1-2.15, p = 0.011), respectively. Extensive cGVHD was lower in HaploSCT compared with MSD, HR = 0.61 (95% CI 0.43-0.88, p = 0.007), while total cGVHD did not differ significantly, HR = 0.94 (95% CI 0.74-1.18, p = 0.58). LFS, OS and GRFS did not differ significantly between the 2 transplant groups, HR = 0.96 (95% CI 0.81-1.14, p = 0.66); HR = 1.18 (95% CI 0.96-1.43, p = 0.11) and HR = 0.93 (95% CI 0.79-1.09, p = 0.37), respectively. These results were confirmed in a matched-pair analysis.

Conclusions: Outcomes of adult patients with ALL in CR receiving alloSCT from haploidentical donors are not significantly different from those receiving transplants from MSD in terms of LFS, OS and GRFS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13045-021-01065-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8017786PMC
April 2021

Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization and Collection in Pediatric Healthy Sibling Donors Weighing 20 Kilograms or Less; Algerian Experience.

Transfus Apher Sci 2020 Dec 2;59(6):102987. Epub 2020 Nov 2.

Hematology and Bone marrow transplantation department, Pierre and Marie Curie Center, Algiers, Algeria.

Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) are the source of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants currently used for malignant and non-malignant hematological diseases. PBSC harvest may be difficult in young children who are donors. Extracorporeal separator line priming by red blood cells or albumin alone is usually required to improve haemodynamic tolerance and efficacy of collection. We present our experience with 29 children weighing 20 kg or less mobilised between January 2005 and June 2018. The median age and weight at the time of apheresis were 5 years and 18 kg, respectively. A total of 54 PBSC were performed. The median cell yield per apheresis was 5.9 × 10 CD34cells/kg (2,5-13,9) recipient body weight (RBW). Despite their low weight, insertion of a femoral catheter was avoided in 58.6% of children. Nineteen donors required 2 or 3 apheresis sessions without any major complication. Twenty-nine pts with hemopathies have successfully benefited from PBSC except one case of rejection with aplastic anemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transci.2020.102987DOI Listing
December 2020

Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide versus antithymocyte globulin in patients with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation from HLA-identical sibling donors: A retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Cancer 2021 Jan 29;127(2):209-218. Epub 2020 Oct 29.

Hematology Department, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Service d'Hématologie et Thérapie Cellulaire, Paris, France.

Background: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Addition of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY) to standard immunosuppressive agents reduces GVHD in different donor settings.

Methods: We compared the outcomes of adults with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing allo-HSCT from HLA-identical sibling donors after the use of PTCY (n = 197) or ATG (n = 1913).

Results: Patients in the PTCY group were younger than those in the ATG group (median age, 47 vs 54 years; P < .01). Peripheral blood was the most frequently used stem cell source, being significantly more frequent in the ATG group than in the PTCY group (95% vs 70% P < .01). The conditioning regimen was more frequently myeloablative in the PTCY group than in the ATG group (59% vs 48%; P < .01). Time to neutrophil engraftment was shorter in the ATG group than in the PTCY group (17 vs 20 days; P < .01). No differences were observed according to the other transplantation outcomes, except for chronic GVHD of all grades and extensive chronic GVHD at 2 years, which were significantly lower in the ATG group compared with the PTCY group (P < .02).

Conclusion: PTCY is feasible in an HLA-identical sibling setting, and despite similar outcomes, ATG may be associated with lower incidence of chronic GVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.33255DOI Listing
January 2021

Myeloablative conditioning for allo-HSCT in pediatric ALL: FTBI or chemotherapy?-A multicenter EBMT-PDWP study.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2020 08 17;55(8):1540-1551. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Division for Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunology, Department for Children and Adolescents, University Hospital, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.

Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receive fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI) as myeloablative conditioning (MAC) for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), it is an important matter of debate if chemotherapy can effectively replace FTBI. To compare outcomes after FTBI versus chemotherapy-based conditioning (CC), we performed a retrospective EBMT registry study. Children aged 2-18 years after MAC for first allo-HSCT of bone marrow (BM) or peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from matched-related (MRD) or unrelated donors (UD) in first (CR1) or second remission (CR2) between 2000 and 2012 were included. Propensity score weighting was used to control pretreatment imbalances of the observed variables. 3.054 patients were analyzed. CR1 (1.498): median follow-up (FU) after FTBI (1.285) and CC (213) was 6.8 and 6.1 years. Survivals were not significantly different. CR2 (1.556): median FU after FTBI (1.345) and CC (211) was 6.2 years. Outcomes after FTBI were superior as compared with CC with regard to overall survival (OS), leukemia-free survival (LFS), relapse incidence (RI), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). However, we must emphasize the preliminary character of the results of this retrospective "real-world-practice" study. These findings will be prospectively assessed in the ALL SCTped 2012 FORUM trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-020-0854-0DOI Listing
August 2020

Two decades of experience in a combined adult/pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation center in Algiers, Algeria.

Ann Hematol 2020 Mar 23;99(3):619-625. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation Department, Pierre and Marie Curie Center, Avenue Battandier, Algiers, Algeria.

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has evolved from an experimental to a successful treatment modality reaching worldwide 80.000 HSCT/year. Distribution and trends of HSCT, however, remain heterogeneous. Activities range from none to more than 511/10 million population between countries and regions. Here, we report on a successful autologous and allogeneic HSCT program for adult and pediatric patients started two decades ago in Northern Africa. From 1998 to December 2017, a total of 2828 HSCT was performed of which 2059 were allo-HSCT (1474 adults and 585 children). The activities were analyzed according to indication, donor type, stem cell source, and trends over time. There was a significant difference in indications according to age. Adult patients were transplanted more often for hematological malignancies. In children, the indications were distributed equally between malignant and non-malignant diseases. Overall activities increased substantially in AML and to a lower extent in ALL and CLL despite sharp reduction of activity in CML after 2005. Finally, a higher transplantation rate (33/10 million population) was reached as compared to most regions of the world except Europe and USA/Canada. Overall survival in children with AML was 56.0% at 15 years, in adults 61.3% at 5 years, and in patients with CML 55.5% at 15 years without difference between reduced intensity condition (RIC) and myeloablative conditioning (MAC). Patients with Ph+ ALL had the lowest survival reaching 26.7% at 5 years. Highest survival was observed in patients with aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia, and thalassemia reaching 77.3%, 73.5%, and 75.7% at 15 years respectively. Long distances and late referral remain a challenge for this large country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-020-03914-wDOI Listing
March 2020

Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with sequential conditioning in adult patients with refractory or relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the EBMT Acute Leukemia Working Party.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2020 03 27;55(3):595-602. Epub 2019 Sep 27.

EBMT Paris Office, CEREST-TC, Department of Hematology, Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France.

Treatment of relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RR-ALL) remains a clinical challenge with generally dismal prognosis. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation using sequential conditioning ("FLAMSA"-like) has shown promising results in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia, but little is known about its efficacy in RR-ALL. We identified 115 patients (19-66 years) with relapsed (74%) or primary-refractory (26%) ALL allografted from matched related (31%), matched unrelated (58%), or haploidentical donor (11%). Median follow-up was 37 (13-111) months. At day 100, cumulative incidences of grade II-IV/III-IV acute graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) were 30% and 17%, respectively. Two-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 25% with 11% extensive cases. Two-year relapse incidence (RI) was 45%, non-relapse mortality was 41%. Two-year leukemia free survival (LFS) was 14%, overall survival (OS) 17%, and GVHD relapse-free survival (GRFS) was 14%. In multivariable analysis, Karnofsky score <90 negatively affected RI, LFS, OS, and GRFS. Conditioning with chemotherapy alone, compared with total body irradiation (TBI) negatively affected RI (HR = 3.3; p = 0.008), LFS (HR = 1.94; p = 0.03), and OS (HR = 2.0; p = 0.03). These patients still face extremely poor outcomes, highlighting the importance of incorporating novel therapies (e.g., BITE antibodies, inotuzumab, CAR-T cells). Nevertheless, patients with RR-T-cell ALL remain with an unmet treatment need, for which TBI-based sequential conditioning could be one of few available options.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-019-0702-2DOI Listing
March 2020

Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Recommendations for Establishing a Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Program in Countries with Limited Resources, Part II: Clinical, Technical, and Socioeconomic Considerations.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2019 12 17;25(12):2330-2337. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Center for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Aichi Medical University Hospital, Nagakute, Japan; Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany.

The development of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) programs can face significant challenges in most developing countries because such endeavors must compete with other government health care priorities, including the delivery of basic services. Although this is may be a limiting factor, these countries should prioritize development of the needed expertise to offer state-of-the-art treatments, including transplantation, by providing financial, technological, legal, ethical, and other needed support. This would prove beneficial in providing successful programs customized to the needs of their population and potentially provide long-term cost savings by circumventing the need for their citizens to seek care abroad. The costs of establishing an HSCT program and the costs of the HSCT procedure itself can be substantial barriers in developing countries. In addition, socioeconomic factors intrinsic to specific countries can influence access to HSCT, patient eligibility for HSCT, and timely utilization of HSCT center capabilities. This report describes recommendations from the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation for establishing HSCT programs, with a specific focus on developing countries, and identifies challenges and opportunities for providing this specialized procedure in resource-constrained settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.04.012DOI Listing
December 2019

Impact of T-cell depletion strategies on outcomes following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for idiopathic aplastic anemia: A study on behalf of the European blood and marrow transplant severe aplastic anemia working party.

Am J Hematol 2019 01 25;94(1):80-86. Epub 2018 Nov 25.

Federico II University of Napoli, Naples, Italy.

We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of 1837 adults and children with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) who underwent matched sibling donor (MSD) and matched unrelated donor (MUD) hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) between 2000 and 2013. Patients were grouped by transplant conditioning containing either anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) (n = 1283), alemtuzumab (n = 261), or no serotherapy (NS) (n = 293). The risks of chronic GvHD were significantly reduced when ATG or alemtuzumab were compared with NS (P = .021 and .003, respectively). Acute GVHD was significantly reduced in favor of alemtuzumab compared with ATG (P = .012) and NS (P < .001). By multivariate analysis, when compared with ATG, alemtuzumab was associated with a lower risk of developing acute (OR 0.262; 95% CI 0.14-0.47; P < .001) and chronic GVHD (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35-0.94; P = .027). OS was significantly better in ATG and alemtuzumab patients compared with NS (P = .010 and .025). Our data shows inclusion of serotherapy in MSD and MUD HSCT for patients with SAA reduces chronic GVHD and provides a survival advantage over patients not receiving serotherapy. Notably, alemtuzumab reduced the risk of acute and chronic GvHD compared with ATG and indicates that alemtuzumab might be the serotherapy of choice for MSD and MUD transplants for SAA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.25314DOI Listing
January 2019

Narrowing the gap for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the East-Mediterranean/African region: comparison with global HSCT indications and trends.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2019 03 6;54(3):402-417. Epub 2018 Aug 6.

African Blood and Marrow Transplantation Society, Bern, South Africa.

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) activity was evaluated in the African (AFR)/EMRO region and compared to the global activity for the years 2006-2013. Data were obtained from 1570 teams in the 6 WHO continental regions. Of these, 29 (1.85%) of all teams were active in 12 of the 68 AFR/EMRO countries. They reported 2.331 (3.3%) of the worldwide 71.036 HSCT, and a transplant rate of 32.8 (TR; HSCT/10 million inhabitants; worldwide 128.5). This reflects still the lowest regional TR despite an increase of 90% since 2006. HSCT activity in AFR/EMRO countries was characterized by a higher use of allogeneic compared to autologous HSCT, an almost exclusive use of family donors, including haploidentical family donors. These findings contrast with the prevalence of autologous over allogeneic HSCT, and a higher frequency of unrelated HSCT in other parts of the world. Of note, the increase by 200% in HSCT for hemoglobinopathies from 2006 to 2013 (72 per year) in the AFR/EMRO region. This reflects the specific role of HSCT for these disease categories with high prevalence and incidence in the AFR/EMRO region. This report provides information for the competent authorities to foster adequate infrastructure. It urges transplant organization to optimize their cooperation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-018-0275-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6363888PMC
March 2019

Thiotepa-busulfan-fludarabine compared to busulfan-fludarabine for sibling and unrelated donor transplant in acute myeloid leukemia in first remission.

Oncotarget 2018 Jan 15;9(3):3379-3393. Epub 2017 Dec 15.

EBMT Paris Study Office, Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France.

Background: A preparatory regimen consisting of thiotepa-busulfan-fludarabine (TBF) has been associated with reduced relapse in patients with haematological malignancies after haploidentical and cord blood transplants; however, few data exist regarding TBF conditioning in sibling (MSD) and unrelated donor (URD) transplants for AML.

Results: Among patients receiving a myeloablative (MAC) regimen, TBF-MAC was associated with significantly lower relapse (HR 0.47, = 0.005) however higher non-relapse mortality (NRM, HR 2.69, < 10) as compared to BF. This led to similar leukemia-free (LFS) and overall survival (OS) between the two regimens (LFS: = 0.6; OS: = 0.27). When we selected TBF-MAC patients receiving busulfan 9.6 mg/kg, NRM resulted still higher but no more significantly different as compared to BF-MAC with busulfan 12.8 mg/kg (HR 1.53, = 0.12); despite the lower busulfan dose, relapse remained inferior with TBF-MAC (HR 0.45, = 0.01), however no difference in survival could be demonstrated (LFS: = 0.31; OS: 0.82). Among patients receiving a reduced-intensity (RIC) regimen, similar outcome was observed with TBF-RIC and BF-RIC (LFS: = 0.77; OS: = 0.88).

Conclusions: TBF-MAC as conditioning regimen for transplant from MSD and URD in AML patients in first remission provided stronger anti-leukemic activity but higher NRM as compared to BF-MAC, thus leading to similar survival. TBF-MAC with busulfan 9.6 mg/kg was associated with low relapse and acceptable NRM, however again with no survival benefit. TBF-RIC and BF-RIC resulted in comparable outcome.

Methods: We conducted a registry-based study comparing outcomes of patients with AML in first remission undergoing transplant from MSD or URD prepared with either TBF ( = 212) or BF ( = 2698) conditioning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.23273DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5790470PMC
January 2018

Intravenous Busulfan Compared with Treosulfan-Based Conditioning for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Study on Behalf of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2018 04 13;24(4):751-757. Epub 2017 Dec 13.

Division of Hematology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer and Sackler Medical School Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Acute Leukemia Working Party Office, Paris, France.

Dose intensity of the conditioning regimen has significant impact on the outcomes after stem cell transplantation (SCT) for acute myeloid leukemia. Most studies have shown more relapse, less nonrelapse mortality (NRM), and similar overall survival after reduced-intensity and myeloablative conditioning. There are limited data on the dose equivalence and expected outcomes of treosulfan-based compared with busulfan-based conditioning. We compared SCT outcomes after fludarabine with either intravenous busulfan at a myeloablative dose (FB4, 12.8 mg/kg, n = 1265) or a reduced dose (FB2, 6.4 mg/kg, n = 1456) or treosulfan at 42 g/m (FT14, n = 403) or 36 g/m (FT12, n = 168). Median patient age was 48, 60, 57, and 60 years in the FB4, FB2, FT14, and FT12 groups, respectively (P < .0001). Two-year overall survival was 58%, 53%, 53%, and 51%, respectively (P = .25). Multivariate analysis identified advanced age, advanced disease status, and secondary leukemia to be associated with worse survival. Relapse rate was 30%, 35%, 34%, and 40%, respectively. Relapse was more common after FB2, advanced age and disease status, secondary leukemia, and sibling donors. NRM was 17%, 18%, 21%, and 16%, respectively. NRM was least common after FT12 and more common with advanced age and disease status and unrelated donors. Treosulfan-based regimens were associated with lower rates of graft-versus-host disease. There was no difference in any outcome among patients in first complete remission at transplantation. However, there was better survival with treosulfan-based conditioning in advanced leukemia. In conclusion, survival is determined mostly by disease biology and is similar after various regimens. Treosulfan-based conditioning is more similar to myeloablative than to reduced-intensity conditioning but can be administered safely in older patients, with lower rates of graft-versus-host disease and possibly better outcomes in patients with active leukemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2017.12.776DOI Listing
April 2018

Impact of in vivo T cell depletion in HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission conditioned with a fludarabine iv-busulfan myeloablative regimen: a report from the EBMT Acute Leukemia Working Party.

J Hematol Oncol 2017 01 24;10(1):31. Epub 2017 Jan 24.

ALWP Office, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France.

Background: The impact of the use of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) in allogeneic stem cell transplantation performed with HLA-identical sibling donors following fludarabine and 4 days intravenous busulfan myeloablative conditioning regimen has been poorly explored.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 566 patients who underwent a first HLA-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation with this conditioning regimen for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission between 2006 and 2013 and compared the outcomes of 145 (25.6%) patients who received ATG (ATG group) to 421 (74.4%) who did not (no-ATG group). The Kaplan-Meier estimator, the cumulative incidence function, and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used where appropriate.

Results: Patients in the ATG group were older, received more frequently peripheral blood stem cell grafts from older donors, and were transplanted more recently. With a median follow-up of 19 months, patients in the ATG group had reduced 2-year cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (31 vs. 52%, p = 0.0002) and of its extensive form (8 vs. 26%, p < 0.0001) but similar relapse incidence (22 vs. 27%, p = 0.23) leading to improved GVHD and relapse-free survival (GRFS) (60 vs. 40%, p = 0.0001). In multivariate analyses, the addition of ATG was independently associated with lower chronic GVHD (HR = 0.46, p = 0.0001), improved leukemia-free survival (HR = 0.67, p = 0.027), overall survival (HR = 0.65, p = 0.027), and GRFS (HR = 0.51, p = 4 × 10). Recipient age above 50 years was the only other factor associated with worse survivals.

Conclusions: These results suggest that the use of ATG with fludarabine and 4 days intravenous busulfan followed by HLA-identical sibling donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia improves overall transplant outcomes due to reduced incidence of chronic GVHD without increased relapse risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13045-016-0389-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5259921PMC
January 2017

Impact of Conditioning Regimen on Outcomes for Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Transplantation in First Complete Remission. An Analysis on Behalf of the Pediatric Disease Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2017 Mar 1;23(3):467-474. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Bone Marrow Transplant Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the cornerstone of treatment in pediatric high-risk and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of the present study was to compare outcomes of pediatric patients with AML undergoing HSCT using 3 different conditioning regimens: total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide (Cy); busulfan (Bu) and Cy; or Bu, Cy, and melphalan (Mel). In this retrospective study, registry data for patients > 2 and <18 years age undergoing matched allogeneic HSCT for AML in first complete remission (CR1) in 204 European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers between 2000 and 2010 were analyzed. Data were available for 631 patients; 458 patients received stem cells from a matched sibling donor and 173 from a matched unrelated donor. For 440 patients, bone marrow was used as stem cell source, and 191 patients received peripheral blood stem cells. One hundred nine patients received TBICy, 389 received BuCy, and 133 received BuCyMel as their preparatory regimen. Median follow-up was 55 months. Patients receiving BuCyMel showed a lower incidence of relapse at 5 years (14.7% versus 31.5% in BuCy versus 30% in TBICy, P < .01) and higher overall survival (OS) (76.6% versus 64% versus 64.5%, P = .04) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) (74.5% versus 58% versus 61.9%, P < .01), with a comparable nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (10.8% versus 10.5% versus 8.1%, P = .79). Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades III and IV but not chronic GVHD, was higher in patients receiving BuCyMel. Older age at HSCT had an adverse impact on NRM and the use of peripheral blood as stem cell source was associated with increased chronic GVHD and NRM as well as lower LFS and OS. Among pediatric patients receiving HSCT for AML in CR1, the use of BuCyMel conditioning proved superior to TBICy and BuCy in reducing relapse and improving LFS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2016.11.022DOI Listing
March 2017

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMRO) 2011-2012: A comprehensive report on behalf of the Eastern Mediterranean Blood and Marrow Transplantation group (EMBMT).

Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Ther 2015 Dec 1;8(4):167-75. Epub 2015 Oct 1.

Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Hematology, Oncology and SCT Research Center, Tehran, Iran.

Objective/background: The Eastern Mediterranean Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EMBMT) group has accumulated over 31 years of data and experience in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly in hemoglobinopathies, severe aplastic anemia, inherited metabolic and immune disorders, in addition to a wide array of hematologic malignancies unique to this region. A regional update in current HSCT trends is highly warranted. We studied the trends of HSCT activities in World Health Organization-Eastern Mediterranean (EMRO) region, surveyed by the EMBMT, between 2011 and 2012.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of the survey data mainly of cumulative number of transplants, types of transplants (autologous vs. allogeneic), types of conditioning such as myeloablative versus reduced intensity was conducted. Also, trends in leukemias, hemoglobinopathies, severe aplastic anemia, inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, amongst others were analyzed.

Results: Twenty-one teams from nine EMRO countries reported their data (100% return rate) to the EMBMT for the years 2011-2012, with a total of 3,546 first HSCT (1,670 in 2011; 1,876 in 2012). Allogeneic HSCT (allo-HSCT) represented the majority (62%) in both years. The main indications for allo-HSCT were acute leukemias (988; 46%), bone marrow failure syndromes (421, 20%), hemoglobinopathies (242; 11%), and immune deficiencies (157; 7%). There was a progressive increase in the proportions of chronic myeloid leukemia cases transplanted beyond first chronic phase (37 [7%] of all chronic myeloid leukemia cases in 2011 vs. 39 [29%] in 2012). The main indications for autologous transplants were multiple myeloma/plasma cell disorders (510; 39%), Hodgkin lymphoma (311; 24%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (259; 20%), and solid tumors (163; 12%). Reduced intensity conditioning continued to show a progressive decrease over years (9.5% in 2011 vs. 7.9% in 2012), yet remained relatively low compared with contemporary practices in Europe published by EBMT. The vast majority (91%) of allo-HSCT source was from sibling donors with continued dominance of peripheral blood (64%) followed by bone marrow (33%).While umbilical cord blood transplants increased to 4% of allo-HSCT, matched unrelated donor remained underutilized and there was no haplo-identical transplant reported. Large centers with >50 HSCT/year, showed a continued increase in the total number of allo-HSCT over the past 2years that may be related to capacity building issues and require further studies.

Conclusion: There is a discernable increase of HSCT rate in the EMRO region with a significant expansion in utilization of cord blood transplants and allogeneic peripheral blood-HSCT as a valuable source. However, further research of outcome data and the development of regional donor banks (cord blood and matched unrelated donors) may help to facilitate future planning to satisfy the escalating regional needs and augment collaboration within the EMBMT and globally.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hemonc.2015.09.002DOI Listing
December 2015

Higher busulfan dose intensity appears to improve leukemia-free and overall survival in AML allografted in CR2: An analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Leuk Res 2015 Sep 24;39(9):933-7. Epub 2015 Apr 24.

Acute Leukemia Working Party of EBMT, Paris, France; Département d'Hématologie, Hopital Saint Antoine, Paris, France. Electronic address:

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is a potentially curative treatment in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Recent advances in the field of hematopoietic cell allografting have resulted in a practice shift, favoring less intense preparative regimens. We present results of a retrospective comparative analysis of two preparative regimens, namely FB2 (IV fludarabine plus IV busulfan 6.4mg/kg±10%) and FB4 (IV fludarabine plus IV busulfan 12.8mg/kg ±10%), in patients with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell allografting in second complete remission at EBMT participating centers. Between 2003 and 2010, 128 AML patients in second complete remission were allografted following a preparative regimen of FB2 (n=88) or FB4 (n=40). The median time-to-neutrophil engraftment was similar whether patients received FB2 (16 (5-38) days) or FB4 (16 (9-29) days), p=0.45. A multivariate analysis showed that use of FB4 resulted in improved 2-year leukemia-free (HR=0.44 (95%CI=0.21, 0.94), p=0.03) and overall survival (HR=0.38 (95%CI=0.16, 0.86), p=0.02). Cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality (2-year) for all patients was 21% (95%CI=14-28%). Our analysis suggests that FB4 improves 2-year leukemia-free and overall survival in AML allografted in second complete remission. A confirmatory randomized controlled trial that compares these two preparative regimens (FB2 vs. FB4) in AML in CR2 is definitely warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2015.04.009DOI Listing
September 2015

Efficacy and outcome of allogeneic transplantation in IgD and nonsecretory myeloma. A report on behalf of the Myeloma Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 2015 Jun 20;21(6):1054-8. Epub 2015 Feb 20.

Tumor Immunology, University Medical Center St, Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

We have recently reported on the outcome of autologous transplantation in the rare myelomas (IgD, IgE, IgM, and nonsecretory [NS]) but there is no real information on the outcome of these conditions after allogeneic transplantation. We used the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation myeloma database to compare the outcomes after allogeneic transplantation of 1354 common myelomas (IgG, IgA, and light chain myeloma) with the outcome in 26 IgD myelomas and 52 NS myelomas. There was little difference between common and the IgD and NS myeloma patients with respect to prognostic factors although the IgD group had a higher beta 2 microglobulin at diagnosis, shorter time to transplantation, and more T cell depletion. IgD and NS patients had a significantly greater achievement of complete remission at conditioning but this did not translate into equivalent progression-free survival and overall survival for the IgD patients although the NS outcome was very similar to that of common myeloma. The PFS and OS of IgD, common, and NS myelomas appear similar after allogeneic transplantation, despite a tendency for higher early relapse rate in IgD myeloma. Allogeneic transplantation may, therefore, be an option to investigate in prospective observational studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbmt.2015.02.012DOI Listing
June 2015

Current outcome of HLA identical sibling versus unrelated donor transplants in severe aplastic anemia: an EBMT analysis.

Haematologica 2015 May 23;100(5):696-702. Epub 2015 Jan 23.

GKT School of Medicine, Deptartment of Haematological Medicine, King's Denmark Hill Campus, London, UK.

We have analyzed 1448 patients with acquired aplastic anemia grafted between 2005 and 2009, and compared outcome of identical sibling (n=940) versus unrelated donor (n=508) transplants. When compared to the latter, sibling transplants were less likely to be performed beyond 180 days from diagnosis (39% vs. 85%), to have a cytomegalovirus negative donor/recipient status (15% vs. 23%), to receive antithymocyte globulin in the conditioning (52% vs. 61%), and more frequently received marrow as a stem cell source (60% vs. 52%). Unrelated donor grafts had significantly more acute grade II-IV (25% vs. 13%) and significantly more chronic graft-versus-host disease (26% vs. 14%). In multivariate analysis, the risk of death of unrelated donor grafts was higher, but not significantly higher, compared to a sibling donor (P=0.16). The strongest negative predictor of survival was the use of peripheral blood as a stem cell source (P<0.00001), followed by an interval of diagnosis to transplant of 180 days or more (P=0.0005), patient age 20 years or over (P=0.0005), no antithymocyte globulin in the conditioning (P=0.003), and donor/recipient cytomegalovirus sero-status, other than negative/negative (P=0.04). In conclusion, in multivariate analysis, the outcome of unrelated donor transplants for acquired aplastic anemia, is currently not statistically inferior when compared to sibling transplants, although patients are at greater risk of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The use of peripheral blood grafts remains the strongest negative predictor of survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2014.115345DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4420220PMC
May 2015

Who is the best hematopoietic stem-cell donor for a male patient with acute leukemia?

Transplantation 2014 Sep;98(5):569-77

1 Center for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation and Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. 2 Department of Haematology, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France. 3 Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Essen, University Hospital, Essen, Germany. 4 Medizinische Klinik m. S. Hämatologie/Onkologie, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany. 5 Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I, Universitätsklinikum Dresden, Dresden, Germany. 6 CHU Bordeaux, Hôpital Haut-leveque, Pessac, France. 7 Division of Hematology, Oncology and Hemostasiology, University Hospital Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. 8 Service Hématologie Greffe de Moelle, Centre Pierre et Marie Curie, Alger, Algeria. 9 Department of Hematology and BMT, Silesian Medical Academy, Katowice, Poland. 10 Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hannover Medical University, Hannover, Germany. 11 Department of Hematology - BMT, Hôpital St. Louis, Paris, France. 12 Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany. 13 Division of Hematology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. 14 Centre for Clinical Haematology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom. 15 Address correspondence to: Olle Ringdén, M.D., Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet, Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, F79, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Female donors for male recipients worsen the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. We wanted to find out whether a male human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched unrelated donor (MUD, 8/8, n=2,014) might be an alternative to a female HLA-identical sibling donor (n=2,656) for male patients with acute leukemia.

Methods: This is a retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukaemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Results: The relative risk (RR) of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) of grades II to IV was increased in the MUD group with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (RR, 1.47; P<0.001) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (RR, 1.76; P<0.001). There was no difference in incidence of chronic GVHD and nonrelapse mortality between the two groups. Probability of relapse was lower in the MUD group than in the sibling group in patients with ALL (hazards ratio [HR], 0.75; P=0.04) but not in the AML patients (HR, 0.89; P=0.17). Survival was not different between the groups. Leukemia-free survival (LFS) was also similar in the sibling and MUD groups in patients with AML (HR, 1.01; P=0.81) or ALL (HR, 0.93; P=0.45). Factors significantly associated with reduced LFS included active disease, poor cytogenetics, age, year of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, reduced-intensity conditioning, and the use of antithymocyte globulin.

Conclusion: Male patients who received grafts from male MUDs demonstrated an increased incidence of acute GVHD and LFS same as when using HLA-identical female donors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TP.0000000000000102DOI Listing
September 2014

Bone marrow versus peripheral blood as the stem cell source for sibling transplants in acquired aplastic anemia: survival advantage for bone marrow in all age groups.

Haematologica 2012 Aug 7;97(8):1142-8. Epub 2012 Feb 7.

Divisione Ematologia e Trapianto, IRCCS San Martino IST, Genova, Italy.

Background: Bone marrow has been shown to be superior to peripheral blood, as a stem cell source, in young patients (<20 years of age) with acquired aplastic anemia undergoing a matched sibling transplant. The aim of this study was to test whether this currently also holds true for older patients with acquired aplastic anemia.

Design And Methods: We analyzed 1886 patients with acquired aplastic anemia who received a first transplant from a human leukocyte antigen identical sibling between 1999 and 2009, with either bone marrow (n=1163) or peripheral blood (n=723) as the source of stem cells.

Results: In multivariate Cox analysis negative predictors for survival were: patient's age over 20 years (RR 2.0, P<0.0001), an interval between diagnosis and transplantation of more than 114 days (RR 1.3, P=0.006), no anti-thymocyte globulin in the conditioning (RR 1.6, P=0.0001), a conditioning regimen other than cyclophosphamide (RR=1.3, P=0.008) and the use of peripheral blood as the source of stem cells (RR 1.6, P<0.00001). The survival advantage for recipients of bone marrow rather than peripheral blood was statistically significant in patients aged 1-19 years (90% versus 76% P<0.00001) as well as in patients aged over 20 years (74% versus 64%, P=0.001). The advantage for recipients of bone marrow over peripheral blood was maintained above the age of 50 years (69% versus 39%, P=0.01). Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were more frequent in peripheral blood transplants. Major causes of death were graft-versus-host disease (2% versus 6% in bone marrow and peripheral blood recipients, respectively), infections (6% versus 13%), and graft rejection (1.5% versus 2.5%).

Conclusions: This study shows that bone marrow should be the preferred stem cell source for matched sibling transplants in acquired aplastic anemia, in patients of all age groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2011.054841DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3409810PMC
August 2012

Risk of complications during hematopoietic stem cell collection in pediatric sibling donors: a prospective European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Pediatric Diseases Working Party study.

Blood 2012 Mar 12;119(12):2935-42. Epub 2011 Dec 12.

Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz, Poland.

We investigated prospectively factors influencing the safety of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) collection in 453 pediatric donors. The children in the study donated either BM or peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) according to center policy. A large variability in approach to donor issues was observed between the participating centers. Significant differences were observed between BM and PBSC donors regarding pain, blood allotransfusion, duration of hospital stay, and iron supplementation; however, differences between the groups undergoing BM vs PBSC donation preclude direct risk comparisons between the 2 procedures. The most common adverse event was pain, reported mainly by older children after BM harvest, but also observed after central venous catheter (CVC) placement for PBSC collection. With regard to severe adverse events, one patient (0.7%) developed a pneumothorax with hydrothorax after CVC placement for PBSC collection. The risk of allotransfusion after BM harvest was associated with a donor age of < 4 years and a BM harvest volume of > 20 mL/kg. Children < 4 years were at higher risk than older children for allotransfusion after BM harvest and there was a higher risk of complications from CVC placement before apheresis. We conclude that PBSC and BM collection are safe procedures in children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2011-04-349688DOI Listing
March 2012

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMRO) 2008-2009: report on behalf of the Eastern Mediterranean Bone Marrow Transplantation (EMBMT) Group.

Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Ther 2011 ;4(2):81-93

King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Background: The Eastern Mediterranean Bone Marrow Transplantation (EMBMT) Group has accumulated over 25 years of data and experience in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), most particularly in hemoglobinopathies, severe aplastic anemia (SAA), and inherited metabolic and immune disorders, in addition to hematologic malignancies peculiar to the region and where recent updates in trends in activities are warranted.

Objectives: To study trends in HSCT activities in the World Health Organization-Eastern Mediterranean (EM) region surveyed by EMBMT between 2008 and 2009.

Study Design: Retrospective analysis of the survey data, mainly of the cumulative number of transplants, types of transplants (autologous vs. allogeneic), types of conditioning as myeloablative (MAC) vs. reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) and trends in leukemias, hemoglobinopathies, SAA, inherited bone marrow failure syndromes amongst others.

Results And Discussion: Fourteen teams from ten Eastern Mediterranean Region Organization (EMRO) countries reported their data (100% return rate) to the EMBMT for the years 2008-2009 with a total of 2608 first HSCT (1286 in 2008; 1322 in 2009). Allogeneic HSCT represented the majority (63%) in both years. The main indications for allogeneic HSCT were acute leukemias (732; 44%), bone marrow failure syndromes (331, 20%), hemoglobinopathies (255; 15%) and immune deficiencies (90; 5%). There was a progressive increase in the proportions of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cases transplanted beyond the first chronic phase (3; 7% of all CML cases in 2008 vs 13; 29% in 2009). The main indications for autologous transplants were plasma cell disorders (345; 36%) Hodgkin disease (256; 27%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (207; 22%) and solid tumors (83; 9%). RIC continued to show a progressive increase over the years (7% in 2007, 11% in 2008 and 13% in 2009), yet remained relatively low compared to contemporary practices in Europe published by EBMT. The vast majority (95%) of allo-HSCT sources were from sibling donors with a continued dominance of peripheral blood (PB) (1076; 63%), while cord blood transplant (CBT) increased to 83 (5% of allo-HSCT), matched unrelated donor (MUD) remained underutilized (1; 0%) and there were no haploidentical transplants reported. Large centers with >50 HSCT/year showed a plateau of the total number of allo-HSCT over the last 5 years that may be related to capacity issues and needs further study.

Conclusions And Recommendations: There is an overall increased rate of HSCT in the EMRO region with a significant increase in utilization of CBT and allogeneic PB-HSCT as a valuable source. However, further research on outcome data and development of regional donor banks (CB and MUD) may help facilitate future planning to satisfy the regional needs and increase collaboration within the group and globally.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5144/1658-3876.2011.81DOI Listing
December 2011