Publications by authors named "Rose-Marie Ölander"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Immunity after (re)vaccination of paediatric patients following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Acta Paediatr 2012 Aug 16;101(8):e373-7. Epub 2012 May 16.

Division of Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

Aims: Loss of specific immunity follows allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in the majority of cases. Responses to (re)vaccinations can be used as indicators of a functional immunological recovery.

Methods: Twenty-three paediatric recipients of HSCT were enrolled in a single centre setting and responses to scheduled immunizations analysed.

Results: Immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases was impaired post HSCT, but (re)vaccinations induced protective responses in 59-100%, depending on the vaccine, regardless of prior graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) history.

Conclusion: Despite the marked impact of moderate to severe chronic prior GVHD on both the qualitative and quantitative T-cell recovery post allogenic HSCT, most paediatric recipients of allogeneic stem cell grafts appear to attain protective antibody levels after immunization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2012.02710.xDOI Listing
August 2012

Antibody responses to tetanus and diphtheria vaccine in chronic and recurrent rhinosinusitis.

Rhinology 2011 Mar;49(1):90-4

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.

Objectives: Chronic rhinosinusitis may be accompanied by impaired immunity despite normal levels of serum immunoglobulins. Immune responses in sinusitis patients have previously been evaluated using polysaccharide vaccines. Our AIM was to assess the immune status by evaluating responses to diphtheria and tetanus vaccine.

Methods: Specific antibodies were measured before and 2 weeks after vaccination in 25 patients with chronic or recurrent sinusitis and in 30 healthy individuals. The mean age of the patients was 46 years and that of healthy controls 43 years.

Results: After vaccination the patients had on average 4.08-fold lower responses to diphtheria toxoid and 2.20-fold lower responses to tetanus than the controls. Fourteen out of 25 patients had antibody levels that did not reach the 95% normal distribution range of healthy controls after either diphtheria or tetanus vaccination. All the patients had normal levels of serum immunoglobulins.

Conclusions: A significant proportion of patients with persisting symptoms of rhinosinisitis may have impaired responses to protein vaccines. Responses to protein vaccines may be used to evaluate immune function of sinusitis patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4193/Rhino10.005DOI Listing
March 2011

External quality assessment for the determination of diphtheria antitoxin in human serum.

Clin Vaccine Immunol 2010 Aug 7;17(8):1282-90. Epub 2010 Jul 7.

Istituto Superiore di Sanità, CRIVIB, viale Regina Elena 299, Rome, Italy.

Accurate determination of diphtheria toxin antibodies is of value in determining the rates of immunity within broad populations or the immune status of individuals who may be at risk of infection, by assessing responses to vaccination and immunization schedule efficacy. Here we report the results of an external quality assessment (EQA) study for diphtheria serology, performed within the dedicated surveillance network DIPNET. Twelve national laboratories from 11 European countries participated by testing a standard panel of 150 sera using their current routine method: Vero cell neutralization test (NT), double-antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; DAE), dual double-antigen time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (dDA-DELFIA), passive hemagglutination assay (PHA), toxin binding inhibition assay (ToBI), and in-house or commercial ELISAs. The objective of the study was not to identify the best assay, as the advantages and drawbacks of methods used were known, but to verify if laboratories using their routine method would have categorized (as negative, equivocal, or positive) a serum sample in the same way. The performance of each laboratory was determined by comparing its results on a quantitative and qualitative basis to NT results from a single reference laboratory, as this test is considered the in vitro "gold standard." The performance of laboratories using NT was generally very good, while the laboratories' performance using other in vitro methods was variable. Laboratories using ELISA and PHA performed less well than those using DAE, dDA-DELFIA, or ToBI. EQA is important for both laboratories that use in vitro nonstandardized methods and those that use commercial ELISA kits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00096-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2916253PMC
August 2010

Bordetella pertussis isolates in Finland: serotype and fimbrial expression.

BMC Microbiol 2008 Sep 25;8:162. Epub 2008 Sep 25.

Pertussis Reference Laboratory, National Public Health Institute, Kiinamyllynkatu 13, 20520 Turku, Finland.

Background: Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough or pertussis in humans. It produces several virulence factors, of which the fimbriae are considered adhesins and elicit immune responses in the host. B. pertussis has three distinct serotypes Fim2, Fim3 or Fim2,3. Generally, B. pertussis Fim2 strains predominate in unvaccinated populations, whereas Fim3 strains are often isolated in vaccinated populations. In Finland, pertussis vaccination was introduced in 1952. The whole-cell vaccine contained two strains, 18530 (Fim3) since 1962 and strain 1772 (Fim2,3) added in 1976. After that the vaccine has remained the same until 2005 when the whole-cell vaccine was replaced by the acellular vaccine containing pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin. Our aims were to study serotypes of Finnish B. pertussis isolates from 1974 to 2006 in a population with > 90% vaccination coverage and fimbrial expression of the isolates during infection. Serotyping was done by agglutination and serotype-specific antibody responses were determined by blocking ELISA.

Results: Altogether, 1,109 isolates were serotyped. Before 1976, serotype distributions of Fim2, Fim3 and Fim2,3 were 67%, 19% and 10%, respectively. From 1976 to 1998, 94% of the isolates were Fim2 serotype. Since 1999, the frequency of Fim3 strains started to increase and reached 83% during a nationwide epidemic in 2003. A significant increase in level of serum IgG antibodies against purified fimbriae was observed between paired sera of 37 patients. The patients infected by Fim3 strains had antibodies which blocked the binding of monoclonal antibodies to Fim3 but not to Fim2. Moreover, about one third of the Fim2 strain infected patients developed antibodies capable of blocking of binding of both anti-Fim2 and Fim3 monoclonal antibodies.

Conclusion: Despite extensive vaccinations in Finland, B. pertussis Fim2 strains were the most common serotype. Emergence of Fim3 strains started in 1999 and coincided with nationwide epidemics. Results of serotype-specific antibody responses suggest that Fim2 strains could express Fim3 during infection, showing a difference in fimbrial expression between in vivo and in vitro.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2180-8-162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2562373PMC
September 2008

Response and persistence of antibodies to PRP-T and DTwP vaccines with concomitant administration of conjugate vaccines.

Vaccine 2007 Jan 12;25(4):605-11. Epub 2006 Oct 12.

Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, Filinvest Corporate City, Alabang, Muntinlupa City 1780, Philippines.

We first studied the immunogenicity of PRP-T and DTwP vaccines in Filipino infants given at 6, 10 and 14 weeks concomitantly with either an aluminum adjuvanted eleven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (11PncTD) or a meningococcal diphtheria-conjugated vaccine as compared to a control group that received only DTwP/PRP-T. The GMCs and proportions of infants achieving protective antibody concentrations to DTwP and PRP-T vaccine antigens were similar among the groups. In the second phase, the control group received 11PncTD at 18 weeks and the antibody concentrations were measured at 9 months in all children; 11PncTD induced a booster response to diphtheria in the control group. There was no negative interference from concomitant administration of new conjugate vaccines. In contrast, 11PncTD can boost the antibody response to the carrier proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2006.08.038DOI Listing
January 2007

Fatal case of diphtheria in an unvaccinated infant in Finland.

Pediatr Infect Dis J 2003 Sep;22(9):844-6

Tampere University Hospital, PO Box 2000, FIN-33521 Tampere, Finland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.inf.0000083906.24285.23DOI Listing
September 2003