Publications by authors named "Rosanna Maria Di Bartolo"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: potassium ascorbate with ribose therapy in a syndrome with high neoplastic risk.

Anticancer Res 2011 Nov;31(11):3973-6

Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Reproductive Medicine, University of Siena, Viale Mario Bracci 36, 53100 Siena, Italy.

Background: Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) is a genomic imprinting disorder characterized by overgrowth and increased risk of malignancy. We studied the oxidative stress (OS) pattern of our patients with BWS and administered, for the first time, potassium ascorbate with ribose (PAR) once a day as long-term therapy in order to correct the effects induced by free radicals.

Patients And Methods: We describe the clinical features of three patients examined every three months in our clinic. OS was ascertained by measuring a panel of OS biomarkers: non-protein-binding iron, total hydroperoxides, advanced oxidation protein products, isoprostanes, carbonyl groups and thiols. After the presence of OS was established, treatment with PAR was started at the dosage of 300 mg of Potassium Bicarbonate and 150 mg of Ascorbic Acid in aqueous solution and changes occurring in OS biomarkers were followed dosing every three months.

Results: Our patients showed higher levels of OS biomarkers than controls at the time of diagnosis. There was a reduction in OS biomarker values for all three patients with treatment. No primary or secondary neoplastic disease was observed in 9 months of follow-up.

Conclusion: This is the first report showing OS occurring in BWS. No drug until this report has been published showing efficacy against OS in any cancer. Given the limited number of patients, care must be taken to mitigate enthusiasm. We are collecting data for a large number of BWS patients to confirm these preliminary results.
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November 2011

Epilepsy, speech delay, and mental retardation in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2011 Sep 16;15(5):456-60. Epub 2011 Jul 16.

Department of Pediatrics, Gynecology, Obstetrics, and Reproductive Medicine, Pediatric Neurology Section, University of Siena, Italy.

Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most common muscular dystrophies which is related to the deletion of tandem repeats on chromosome 4q35. Extramuscular features such as hearing loss, retinopathy, mental retardation, and epilepsy, may be observed in patients carrying large 4q35 deletions resulting in fragment sizes less than 12 kilobases (kb) (normal >35 kb). We report on a family affected by FSHD carrying a small 4q35 deletion and residual fragments length of 17 kb, presenting with epilepsy (three patients), speech delay (two), and mental retardation (one). In all patients semeiology of seizures and interictal EEG anomalies were congruent with a localization-related epilepsy possibly involving the temporal lobe. In conclusion, we provide further evidences that extramuscular findings such as epilepsy, speech delay, and mental retardation may occur in those patients carrying smaller 4q35 deletions, suggesting that a close correlation between 4q35 fragment size and clinical severity in FSHD is therefore not constant. Moreover, a review of the literature and our observations seem to suggest that focal epilepsies, likely related to the temporal lobe in the present family, represent the main type of epilepsy occurring in children with FSHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2011.04.003DOI Listing
September 2011

Photoparoxysmal responses in children with chromosomal aberrations.

Epilepsy Res 2006 Dec 20;72(2-3):164-70. Epub 2006 Sep 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics, and Reproductive Medicine, University of Siena, Viale M. Bracci, 53100 Siena, Italy.

Electroencephalographic (EEG) anomalies and epilepsy are commonly observed in the clinical picture of patients with chromosomal aberrations. However, no investigations have been performed on the relationship between chromosomal disorders and photoparoxysmal response (PPR). In this study, we evaluate the characteristics of PPRs elicited with intermittent photic stimulation during a routine electroencephalogram in children affected by chromosomal anomalies and correlated this with the clinical profile of the child. A review of the literature has also been performed. PPRs occurred in 14% (4/28) of patients. PPRs were brief (
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2006.07.016DOI Listing
December 2006

Childhood absence epilepsy: evolution and prognostic factors.

Epilepsia 2005 Nov;46(11):1796-801

Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology Section, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Purpose: To evaluate how diagnostic criteria influence remission rates for patients with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and to assess clinical and EEG parameters as predictors of outcome.

Methods: One hundred nineteen patients were diagnosed with CAE, according to International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification criteria. They were subsequently evaluated according to stricter diagnostic criteria. Sixty-two subjects fulfilled these criteria as group 2; 57 did not and constituted group 1. Diagnostic parameters that prevented patients of group 1 from entering group 2, and variables such as sex, familial history of generalized epilepsy, and personal history of febrile convulsions also were tested as prognostic factors for terminal remission.

Results: Compared with those in group 1, patients of group 2 had significantly higher rates of seizure control (95% vs. 77%), higher rates of terminal remission (82% vs. 51%), fewer generalized tonic-clonic seizures (8% vs. 30%), and shorter mean periods of treatment (2.2 vs. 3.8 years). Significantly fewer patients were receiving polytherapy in group 2 than in group 1 (11% vs. 47%), and fewer patients had seizure relapses at antiepileptic drug discontinuation (0 vs. 22%).

Conclusions: Remission rates of patients with CAE are greatly influenced by the classification criteria used for selection. Stricter diagnostic criteria allow the definition of a homogeneous group of patients with excellent prognosis. Factors predicting unfavorable prognosis were generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the active stage of absences, myoclonic jerks, eyelid myoclonia or perioral myoclonia, and EEG features atypical for CAE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2005.00277.xDOI Listing
November 2005

Typical absence seizures associated with localization-related epilepsy: a clinical and electroencephalographic characterization.

Epilepsy Res 2005 Aug-Sep;66(1-3):13-21

Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Neurology Section, University of Siena, Ospedale Santa Maria Alle Scotte, Via M. Bracci, 53100 Siena, Italy.

Introduction: This paper describes the characteristics of patients with typical absence seizures associated with localization related epilepsy (LRE) and compares electroclinical features of absences occurring in these patients with those having childhood absence epilepsy (CAE).

Methods: Consecutive patients presenting with both LRE and typical absences in their epilepsy history were included in the study (Group 1). Clinical assessments and EEG investigations were conducted during the follow-up. Patients observed during the same period, but with typical absences fulfilling the CAE diagnostic criteria, were assigned to a second group (Group 2).

Results: Fourteen patients were included in Group 1. These patients had a mean age at their last visit of 11.3 years (range 7.2-16.8), with a mean follow-up period of 6.8 years. In all patients LRE was the first type of seizure to occur at median age of 4.95+/-2.1 years (range 1.9-8.8). Typical absences appeared at median age of 7.5+/-2.5 years (range 4.5-12.5), and were well controlled by therapy. Ictal EEG and semiology features of typical absences did not show any distinctive features when compared to those of Group 2 represented by 53 patients affected by CAE. However, age at onset was significantly higher in Group 1, as was the number of patients who underwent polytherapy, and the number with relapses after drug discontinuation. None of patients in Group 1 showed terminal remission.

Conclusion: Although clinically heterogeneous and rare, the association of LRE with typical absences may be more than coincidental. In these patients, typical absences responded well to therapy, but terminal remission rates were lower than for CAE patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2005.06.006DOI Listing
January 2006

Epilepsy and electroencephalographic findings in pericentric inversion of chromosome 12.

J Child Neurol 2004 Aug;19(8):604-8

Department of Pediatrics, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Epilepsy, together with mental retardation, represents a common manifestation of chromosomal aberrations. Specific electroencephalographic (EEG) and epileptic patterns have been described in several chromosomal disorders, such as Angelman's syndrome, Miller-Dieker syndrome, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and ring 20 syndrome. A peculiar electroclinical pattern has also been identified in trisomy 12p syndrome. We report three patients with a pericentric inversion of chromosome 12, with breakpoints localized to p11-q13 and affected by epilepsy or EEG anomalies. Two suffered from epilepsy, which, in the clinical course, was mainly characterized by complex partial seizures with a semiology related to the temporal lobe. In one patient, myoclonic absences, head drop, and massive jerky attacks were also present. In both patients, generalized 3 Hz bursts were registered, together with multifocal and focal paroxysmal activity, which were most prominent in the temporoparietal and temporal areas, respectively. In the other patient, who had no epilepsy, EEG showed bioccipital paroxysmal activity. In all patients, the clinical picture was characterized by the presence of moderate mental retardation and behavioral disorders. The incidence of epilepsy or EEG anomalies among patients with a pericentric inversion of chromosome 12 remains to be ascertained. However, the present study confirms that chromosome 12 anomalies can be associated with epilepsy. Although myoclonic absence-like episodes can occasionally be part of the epileptic phenotype, the electroclinical pattern in pericentric inversion of chromosome 12 seems to be more polymorphic when compared with that observed in trisomy 12p syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/088307380401900807DOI Listing
August 2004

Electroencephalographic and epileptic patterns in X chromosome anomalies.

J Clin Neurophysiol 2004 Jul-Aug;21(4):249-53

Department of Pediatrics, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Although epilepsy and mental retardation are commonly observed in individuals with chromosomal aberrations, the identification of EEG/epileptic profiles in those with specific chromosome anomalies remains difficult. A few syndromes seem to show peculiar clinical and EEG associations. The authors report an electroclinical investigation on a group of patients carrying X chromosome anomalies: 16 patients with Turner's syndrome, 17 with Klinefelter's syndrome, 1 with an X-autosomal rearrangement, 2 with Xq isochromosome [Xq(i)], and 7 with triple X syndrome. Epilepsy and/or EEG anomalies were found in three of the patients with Klinefelter's syndrome, in one patient with an X-autosomal rearrangement, and in five of those with triple X syndrome. No epilepsy or EEG anomalies were detected in the other patients. Epilepsy may be associated with Klinefelter's syndrome. In addition, the authors found that an electroclinical pattern, represented by paroxysmal activity in the posterior regions (temporo-parieto-occipital areas) with complex partial seizures and easily controlled by antiepileptic drugs, may be present in patients with triple X syndrome. In contrast, gross X-autosomal rearrangements are associated with polymorphic EEG/epileptic findings. Although further studies are needed to validate these observations, they clearly confirm the strict relationship between X chromosome anomalies and epilepsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00004691-200407000-00003DOI Listing
December 2004

Schinzel-Giedion syndrome: a further cause of West syndrome.

Brain Dev 2003 Jun;25(4):294-8

Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics, and Reproductive Medicine, University of Siena, Viale M. Bracci, Le Scotte, 53100 Siena, Italy.

Schinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS) is a rare disorder with a likely autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance which is characterized by several facial dysmorphisms, midface hypoplasia, multiple skeletal anomalies including short and sclerotic skull base, short neck, and post-axial polydactyly. Cardiac and urogenital malformations are also present. Thirty-three cases have been described so far. We report on a boy affected by SGS in whom a long-term EEG follow-up showed a progressive deterioration of the background bioelectric activity ending, at the age of 19 months, with a hypsarrhythmic pattern clinically correlated with severe and refractory infantile spasms. EEG deterioration and neuroradiological findings, which showed progressive brain atrophy, confirm the neurodegenerative nature of SGS. We also re-evaluated all the published cases and found that 33% of patients with SGS experienced neonatal seizures and another 25% developed West syndrome in the following months. The seizures appeared extremely refractory to several anticonvulsive treatments. In conclusion, we believe that SGS should be included among the causes of secondary West syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0387-7604(02)00232-2DOI Listing
June 2003