Publications by authors named "Rosalie Bordett"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Raman and quantitative phase imaging allow morpho-molecular recognition of malignancy and stages of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Biosens Bioelectron 2021 Oct 12;190:113403. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21218, USA; The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA; Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. Electronic address:

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most common malignancies that account for nearly one-third of all pediatric cancers. The current diagnostic assays are time-consuming, labor-intensive, and require expensive reagents. Here, we report a label-free approach featuring diffraction phase imaging and Raman microscopy that can retrieve both morphological and molecular attributes for label-free optical phenotyping of individual B cells. By investigating leukemia cell lines of early and late stages along with the healthy B cells, we show that phase images can capture subtle morphological differences among the healthy, early, and late stages of leukemic cells. By exploiting its biomolecular specificity, we demonstrate that Raman microscopy is capable of accurately identifying not only different stages of leukemia cells but also individual cell lines at each stage. Overall, our study provides a rationale for employing this hybrid modality to screen leukemia cells using the widefield QPI and using Raman microscopy for accurate differentiation of early and late-stage phenotypes. This contrast-free and rapid diagnostic tool exhibits great promise for clinical diagnosis and staging of leukemia in the near future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2021.113403DOI Listing
October 2021

Correction: Growing a backbone - functional biomaterials and structures for intervertebral disc (IVD) repair and regeneration: challenges, innovations, and future directions.

Biomater Sci 2021 Mar 11;9(6):2322-2323. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.

Correction for 'Growing a backbone - functional biomaterials and structures for intervertebral disc (IVD) repair and regeneration: challenges, innovations, and future directions' by Matthew D. Harmon et al., Biomater. Sci., 2020, 8, 1216-1239, DOI: .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d1bm90026aDOI Listing
March 2021

Regulating the Supramolecular Polymerization of Fibrous Crystalline Structures in Aqueous Solution.

Macromol Rapid Commun 2021 Apr 1;42(8):e2000677. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Chemistry, Polymer Program at the Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 06269, USA.

Inspired by protein polymerizations, much progress has been made in making "polymer-like" supramolecular structures from small synthetic subunits through non-covalent bonds. A few regulation mechanisms have also been explored in synthetic platforms to create supramolecular polymers and materials with dynamic properties. Herein, a type of reactive regulator that facilitates the dimerization of the monomer precursors through dynamic bonds to trigger the supramolecular assembly from small molecules in an aqueous solution is described. The supramolecular structures are crystalline in nature and the reaction coupled assembly strategy can be extended to a supramolecular assembly of aromatic amide derivatives formed in-situ. The method may be instructive for the development of supramolecular nanocrystalline materials with desired physical properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/marc.202000677DOI Listing
April 2021

Preparation and characterization of amnion hydrogel and its synergistic effect with adipose derived stem cells towards IL1β activated chondrocytes.

Sci Rep 2020 10 30;10(1):18751. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Connecticut Convergence Institute for Translation in Regenerative Engineering, University of Connecticut Health, 263 Farmington Ave, Farmington, CT, 06030, USA.

Inflammation leads to chondrocyte senescence and cartilage degeneration, resulting in osteoarthritis (OA). Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) exert paracrine effects protecting chondrocytes from degenerative changes. However, the lack of optimum delivery systems for ADSCs limits its use in the clinic. The use of extracellular matrix based injectable hydrogels has gained increased attention due to their unique properties. In the present study, we developed hydrogels from amnion tissue as a delivery system for ADSCs. We investigated the potential of amnion hydrogel to maintain ADSC functions, the synergistic effect of AM with ADSC in preventing the catabolic responses of inflammation in stimulated chondrocytes. We also investigated the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in IL-1β induced inflammation in chondrocytes and the ability of AM-ADSC to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Our results showed that AM hydrogels supported cell viability, proliferation, and stemness. ADSCs, AM hydrogels and AM-ADSCs inhibited the catabolic responses of IL-1β and inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, indicating possible involvement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in IL-1β induced inflammation. The results also showed that the synergistic effect of AM-ADSCs was more pronounced in preventing catabolic responses in activated chondrocytes. In conclusion, we showed that AM hydrogels can be used as a potential carrier for ADSCs, and can be developed as a potential therapeutic agent for treating OA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-75921-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7603317PMC
October 2020

Identification and Staging of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Using Quantitative Phase Imaging and Machine Learning.

ACS Sens 2020 10 14;5(10):3281-3289. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

Connecticut Children's Innovation Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut 06032, United States.

Identification and classification of leukemia cells in a rapid and label-free fashion is clinically challenging and thus presents a prime arena for implementing new diagnostic tools. Quantitative phase imaging, which maps optical path length delays introduced by the specimen, has been demonstrated to discern cellular phenotypes based on differential morphological attributes. Rapid acquisition capability and the availability of label-free images with high information content have enabled researchers to use machine learning (ML) to reveal latent features. We developed a set of ML classifiers, including convolutional neural networks, to discern healthy B cells from lymphoblasts and classify stages of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, we show that the average dry mass and volume of normal B cells are lower than those of cancerous cells and that these morphologic parameters increase further alongside disease progression. We find that the relaxed training requirements of a ML approach are conducive to the classification of cell type, with minimal space, training time, and memory requirements. Our findings pave the way for a larger study on clinical samples of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with the overarching goal of its broader use in hematopathology, where the prospect of objective diagnoses with minimal sample preparation remains highly desirable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acssensors.0c01811DOI Listing
October 2020

Bioactive polymeric materials and electrical stimulation strategies for musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration.

Bioact Mater 2020 Sep 7;5(3):468-485. Epub 2020 Apr 7.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.

Electrical stimulation (ES) is predominantly used as a physical therapy modality to promote tissue healing and functional recovery. Research efforts in both laboratory and clinical settings have shown the beneficial effects of this technique for the repair and regeneration of damaged tissues, which include muscle, bone, skin, nerve, tendons, and ligaments. The collective findings of these studies suggest ES enhances cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) production, secretion of several cytokines, and vasculature development leading to better tissue regeneration in multiple tissues. However, there is still a gap in the clinical relevance for ES to better repair tissue interfaces, as ES applied clinically is ineffective on deeper tissue. The use of a conducting material can transmit the stimulation applied from skin electrodes to the desired tissue and lead to an increased function on the repair of that tissue. Ionically conductive (IC) polymeric scaffolds in conjunction with ES may provide solutions to utilize this approach effectively. Injectable IC formulations and their scaffolds may provide solutions for applying ES into difficult to reach tissue types to enable tissue repair and regeneration. A better understanding of ES-mediated cell differentiation and associated molecular mechanisms including the immune response will allow standardization of procedures applicable for the next generation of regenerative medicine. ES, along with the use of IC scaffolds is more than sufficient for use as a treatment option for single tissue healing and may fulfill a role in interfacing multiple tissue types during the repair process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bioactmat.2020.03.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7139146PMC
September 2020

Growing a backbone - functional biomaterials and structures for intervertebral disc (IVD) repair and regeneration: challenges, innovations, and future directions.

Biomater Sci 2020 Mar;8(5):1216-1239

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA. and Department of Orthopedics Surgery, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington, CT, USA and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA.

Back pain and associated maladies can account for an immense amount of healthcare cost and loss of productivity in the workplace. In particular, spine related injuries in the US affect upwards of 5.7 million people each year. The degenerative disc disease treatment almost always arises due to a clinical presentation of pain and/or discomfort. Preferred conservative treatment modalities include the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, massage, acupuncture, chiropractic work, and dietary supplements like glucosamine and chondroitin. Artificial disc replacement, also known as total disc replacement, is a treatment alternative to spinal fusion. The goal of artificial disc prostheses is to replicate the normal biomechanics of the spine segment, thereby preventing further damage to neighboring sections. Artificial functional disc replacement through permanent metal and polymer-based components continues to evolve, but is far from recapitulating native disc structure and function, and suffers from the risk of unsuccessful tissue integration and device failure. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies combine novel material structures, bioactive factors and stem cells alone or in combination to repair and regenerate the IVD. These efforts are at very early stages and a more in-depth understanding of IVD metabolism and cellular environment will also lead to a clearer understanding of the native environment which the tissue engineering scaffold should mimic. The current review focusses on the strategies for a successful regenerative scaffold for IVD regeneration and the need for defining new materials, environments, and factors that are so finely tuned in the healthy human intervertebral disc in hopes of treating such a prevalent degenerative process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9bm01288eDOI Listing
March 2020

Integration of diffraction phase microscopy and Raman imaging for label-free morpho-molecular assessment of live cells.

J Biophotonics 2019 04 13;12(4):e201800291. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Connecticut Children's Innovation Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut.

Label-free quantitative imaging is highly desirable for studying live cells by extracting pathophysiological information without perturbing cell functions. Here, we demonstrate a novel label-free multimodal optical imaging system with the capability of providing comprehensive morphological and molecular attributes of live cells. Our morpho-molecular microscopy (3M) system draws on the combined strength of quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) and Raman microscopy to probe the morphological features and molecular fingerprinting characteristics of each cell under observation. While the commonr-path geometry of our QPM system allows for highly sensitive phase measurement, the Raman microscopy is equipped with dual excitation wavelengths and utilizes the same detection and dispersion system, making it a distinctive multi-wavelength system with a small footprint. We demonstrate the applicability of the 3M system by investigating nucleated and nonnucleated cells. This integrated label-free platform has a promising potential in preclinical research, as well as in clinical diagnosis in the near future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbio.201800291DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6447451PMC
April 2019
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