Publications by authors named "Romina S Petrigh"

3 Publications

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Ancient parasitic DNA reveals presence in Final Pleistocene of South America.

Parasitology 2019 09 3;146(10):1284-1288. Epub 2019 Jul 3.

Laboratorio de Parasitología de Sitios Arqueológicos, CONICET-UNMdP, Dean Funes 3250 (7600), Mar del Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Parasitological analysis of coprolites has allowed exploring ecological relationships in ancient times. Ancient DNA analysis contributes to the identification of coprolites and their parasites. Pleistocene mammalian carnivore coprolites were recovered from paleontological and archaeological site Peñas de las Trampas 1.1 in the southern Puna of Argentina. With the aim of exploring ancient ecological relationships, parasitological analysis was performed to one of them, dated to 16 573-17 002 calibrated years BP, with 95.4% probability. Parasite eggs attributed to Toxascaris sp. by morphological characters were isolated. DNA of coprolite and eggs was extracted to molecular identification. Ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis confirmed the zoological origin of the coprolite as Puma concolor and that of parasite eggs as Toxascaris leonina. This is the oldest molecular parasite record worldwide, and it supports the presence of this parasite since the Pleistocene in America. These findings have implications for the biogeographic history of parasites and for the natural history of the region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0031182019000787DOI Listing
September 2019

First mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences of Lamanema chavezi (Nematoda: Molineidae): Novel findings to improve its identification in feces from South American camelids.

Parasitol Int 2019 Feb 17;68(1):60-62. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

CONICET - Laboratorio de Parasitología de Sitios Arqueológicos, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Calle Funes 3350, Mar del Plata 7600, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Lamanema chavezi (Family Molineidae) is a parasitic nematode of South American camelids (SACs). A few studies have reported this parasite in SACs, mainly in domestic camelid species (llama and alpaca). Parasite identification by means of copro-parasitological methods is non-invasive and allows performing epidemiological studies. However, egg misidentification and difficulty to culture third-stage larvae do not allow identifying nematodes to species level. In contrast, molecular tools allow identifying eggs of gastrointestinal nematodes more accurately. However, the little genomic information available in databases for some species prevents an accurate diagnosis. In the present work, L. chavezi females present in feces of llamas from northwestern Argentina were molecularly characterized to obtain genomic information and improve parasitological diagnosis of L. chavezi-like eggs present in guanaco feces from southeastern Argentina. An 833-bp fragment of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and a 434-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene from both L. chavezi females and eggs were amplified and sequenced. Comparison between sequences from females and eggs showed 99-99.6% identity to rDNA and 99.5-96.1% to the cox1 gene fragments, confirming egg morphological assignment. A higher divergence between sequences was observed in the cox1 fragment, with a maximum variation of 3.9%. The examination of eggs found in guanaco feces from southeastern Argentina and their specific molecular identification represent the first record for this host in Argentine Patagonia and contribute to improving the diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes in SACs, mainly in wild camelids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2018.10.007DOI Listing
February 2019

First palaeoparasitological record of a dioctophymatid egg in an archaeological sample from Patagonia.

Acta Trop 2013 Oct 14;128(1):175-7. Epub 2013 Jun 14.

CONICET-Lab. de Paleoparasitología y Arqueología Contextual, UNMdP, Argentina. Electronic address:

The collection of parasitological information from ancient material requires an exhaustive study of samples. In 2005, cestode and nematode eggs were found in a coprolite sample tentatively assigned to a canid. The sample was obtained from the layer of the archaeological site located in Cerro Casa de Piedra, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina, and dated from 6540±110 years before present. The aim of the present work was to reexamine this fixed sample in order to confirm the presence of these parasites. The palaeoparasitological results support our previous findings. Interestingly, another parasite was also confirmed: a dioctophymatid nematode. Dioctophyma renale has been reported in several modern carnivores in the Southern Hemisphere but in ancient materials, it has only been reported in human coprolites from Switzerland. This report constitutes the first evidence of the presence of a dioctophymatid nematode parasite dioctophymatid nematode in American pre-Columbian times. The results obtained in this work show the importance of revising earlier palaeoparasitological results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2013.06.001DOI Listing
October 2013