Publications by authors named "Romain Schneckenburger"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Risk of intracranial haemorrhage and ischaemic stroke after convexity subarachnoid haemorrhage in cerebral amyloid angiopathy: international individual patient data pooled analysis.

J Neurol 2021 Jul 17. Epub 2021 Jul 17.

Department of Neurology, CHU Caen Normandie, Caen, France.

Objective: To investigate the frequency, time-course and predictors of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), recurrent convexity subarachnoid haemorrhage (cSAH), and ischemic stroke after cSAH associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA).

Methods: We performed a systematic review and international individual patient-data pooled analysis in patients with cSAH associated with probable or possible CAA diagnosed on baseline MRI using the modified Boston criteria. We used Cox proportional hazards models with a frailty term to account for between-cohort differences.

Results: We included 190 patients (mean age 74.5 years; 45.3% female) from 13 centers with 385 patient-years of follow-up (median 1.4 years). The risks of each outcome (per patient-year) were: ICH 13.2% (95% CI 9.9-17.4); recurrent cSAH 11.1% (95% CI 7.9-15.2); combined ICH, cSAH, or both 21.4% (95% CI 16.7-26.9), ischemic stroke 5.1% (95% CI 3.1-8) and death 8.3% (95% CI 5.6-11.8). In multivariable models, there is evidence that patients with probable CAA (compared to possible CAA) had a higher risk of ICH (HR 8.45, 95% CI 1.13-75.5, p = 0.02) and cSAH (HR 3.66, 95% CI 0.84-15.9, p = 0.08) but not ischemic stroke (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.17-1.82, p = 0.33) or mortality (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.16-1.78, p = 0.31).

Conclusions: Patients with cSAH associated with probable or possible CAA have high risk of future ICH and recurrent cSAH. Convexity SAH associated with probable (vs possible) CAA is associated with increased risk of ICH, and cSAH but not ischemic stroke. Our data provide precise risk estimates for key vascular events after cSAH associated with CAA which can inform management decisions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-021-10706-3DOI Listing
July 2021

Heterozygous HTRA1 nonsense or frameshift mutations are pathogenic.

Brain 2021 Jul 16. Epub 2021 Jul 16.

AP-HP, Service de Génétique Moléculaire Neurovasculaire, Hôpital Saint-Louis, France.

Heterozygous missense HTRA1 mutations have been associated with an autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease whereas the pathogenicity of heterozygous HTRA1 stop codon variants is unclear. We performed a targeted high throughput sequencing of all known cerebral small vessel disease genes, including HTRA1, in 3,853 unrelated consecutive CSVD patients referred for molecular diagnosis. The frequency of heterozygous HTRA1 mutations leading to a premature stop codon in this patient cohort was compared with their frequency in large control databases. An analysis of HTRA1 messenger RNA was performed in several stop codon carrier patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were characterized in all probands. Twenty unrelated patients carrying a heterozygous HTRA1 variant leading to a premature stop codon were identified. A highly significant difference was observed when comparing our patient cohort with control databases (gnomAD v3.1.1 (p = 3.12 x 10-17, OR = 21.9), TOPMed freeze 5 (p = 7.6 x 10-18, OR = 27.1) and 1000 Genomes (p = 1.5 x 10-5). Messenger RNA analysis performed in eight patients showed a degradation of the mutated allele strongly suggesting a haploinsufficiency. Clinical and neuroimaging features are similar to those previously reported in heterozygous missense mutation carriers, except for penetrance, which seems lower. Altogether, our findings strongly suggest that heterozygous HTRA1 stop codons are pathogenic through a haploinsufficiency mechanism. Future work will help to estimate their penetrance, an important information for genetic counseling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awab271DOI Listing
July 2021

Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Hyperintensities in Subtypes of Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

Stroke 2018 Dec 7:STROKEAHA118021407. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

From the Normandie University, UNICAEN, Inserm U1237, Caen, France (M.B., M.Z., E.T.).

Background and Purpose- Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensities in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are associated with increased risk of recurrent ICH, cognitive impairment, and death, but whether these lesions are specific to a subtype of ICH remains uncertain. We investigated the association between DWI lesions and ICH subtype and explored the risk factors for DWI lesions. Methods- In a systematic review of ICH studies, we identified those reporting prevalence of DWI lesions. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and risk of bias and collected data. We determined the pooled prevalence of DWI lesions within 90 days after ICH onset for cerebral amyloid angiopathy- and hypertensive angiopathy-related ICH using random-effects meta-analysis. We calculated odds ratios to compare prevalence of DWI lesions by ICH subtype and to assess risk factors for DWI lesions. Results- Eleven studies (1910 patients) were included. The pooled prevalence of DWI lesions was 18.9% (95% CI, 11.1-26.7) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy- and 21.0% (95% CI, 15.3-26.6) in hypertensive angiopathy-related ICH. There was no difference in the prevalence of DWI lesions between cerebral amyloid angiopathy- (64/292 [21.9%]) and hypertensive angiopathy-related ICH (79/370 [21.4%]; odds ratio, 1.25; 95% CI, 0.73-2.15) in the 5 studies reporting data on both ICH pathogeneses. In all ICH, presence of DWI lesions was associated with neuroimaging features of microangiopathy (leukoaraiosis extension, previous ICH, and presence, and number of microbleeds) but not with vascular risk factors or the use of antithrombotic therapies. Conclusions- Prevalence of DWI lesions in acute ICH averages 20%, with no difference between cerebral amyloid angiopathy- and hypertensive angiopathy-related ICH. Detection of DWI lesions may add valuable information to assess the progression of the underlying microangiopathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.021407DOI Listing
December 2018
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