Publications by authors named "Rodrigo Nores"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Detection of Vibrio cholerae aDNA in human burials from the fifth cholera pandemic in Argentina (1886-1887 AD).

Int J Paleopathol 2021 Mar 13;32:74-79. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Instituto de Antropología de Córdoba (IDACOR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (UNC), Departamento de Antropología, Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (UNC), Córdoba, Argentina. Electronic address:

Objective: Detecting traces of ancient DNA of Vibrio cholerae to provide genetic information associated with the fifth cholera pandemic.

Materials: Sediment samples from the sacral foramina of four individuals were analyzed, recovered from a mass grave near an institution dedicated exclusively to the isolation and treatment of citizens infected with cholera in the late 19th century in the city of Cordoba, Argentina.

Methods: Paleogenetic techniques (ancient DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and Sanger sequencing) were applied. Specific primers for Vibrio cholerae (VCR, ctxA, ctxB, and tcpA) were designed.

Results: By amplifying and sequencing the Vibrio cholerae repeats fragment, the infection in at least one individual was confirmed.

Conclusions: The synthesis of the paleogenetic results with the archaeological and historical evidence strongly supports that at least one individual from the mass grave in Cordoba, Argentina, was a victim of the fifth cholera pandemic.

Significance: Confirming the presence of the disease through multiple lines of evidence, including genetic, archaeological, and historical analyses, strengthens and affirms our understanding of the presence, effects, and potential evolutionary paths of the disease in the past.

Limitations: Vibrio cholerae repeats were sequenced in one individual, while the remaining genes could not be amplified, which is likely related to gene copy number.

Suggestions For Future Research: Paleogenetic examination of ancient samples from different locations will broaden our understanding of the origin, evolution, and past dissemination of Vibrio cholerae epidemic strains.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpp.2020.12.004DOI Listing
March 2021

Biological kinship in 750 year old human remains from Central Argentina with signs of interpersonal violence.

Forensic Sci Med Pathol 2020 12 11;16(4):649-658. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades, Departamento de Antropología. CONICET, Instituto de Antropología de Córdoba (IDACOR), Av. Hipólito Yrigoyen 174, 5000, Córdoba, Argentina.

Human skeletal remains of an adult male (20-24 years old) and a juvenile (4-8 years old), dated to 750 ± 85 C years BP, were found on the southern margin of Mar Chiquita Lagoon (Córdoba, Argentina). Both individuals show signs of being victims of interpersonal violence, with arrowheads associated with the remains and perimortem lesions on the juvenile, as well as an unusual form of burial, with the juvenile partially overlapped with the adult. The aim of this work is to study a possible kin relationship between these two individuals through ancient DNA analysis. Biological kinship was evaluated by autosomal and Y-chromosome STR (short tandem repeat) typing, PCR-APLP for SNP determination and hypervariable region I sequencing of the mitochondrial DNA. Genetic analyses indicated that these individuals shared the same Y-chromosomal haplotype but different mitochondrial lineages. The likelihood ratio based on autosomal loci indicates that the genetic profiles of the human remains would be more likely to be that indicating a father-son bond. The paleogenetic approach combined with forensic genetic methods applied to this study allowed us to confirm a hypothesis that originated in bioarchaeological evidence. This study constitutes a unique case in Argentina of kinship determination based on DNA profiles of human remains in an archaeological context of interpersonal violence. It is important to highlight the contribution made by these studies to address topics usually hidden in bioarchaeological studies, such as community organization, cultural customs and mortuary practices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12024-020-00296-3DOI Listing
December 2020

Ancient genomes in South Patagonia reveal population movements associated with technological shifts and geography.

Nat Commun 2020 08 3;11(1):3868. Epub 2020 Aug 3.

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

Archaeological research documents major technological shifts among people who have lived in the southern tip of South America (South Patagonia) during the last thirteen millennia, including the development of marine-based economies and changes in tools and raw materials. It has been proposed that movements of people spreading culture and technology propelled some of these shifts, but these hypotheses have not been tested with ancient DNA. Here we report genome-wide data from 20 ancient individuals, and co-analyze it with previously reported data. We reveal that immigration does not explain the appearance of marine adaptations in South Patagonia. We describe partial genetic continuity since ~6600 BP and two later gene flows correlated with technological changes: one between 4700-2000 BP that affected primarily marine-based groups, and a later one impacting all <2000 BP groups. From ~2200-1200 BP, mixture among neighbors resulted in a cline correlated to geographic ordering along the coast.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-17656-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7400565PMC
August 2020

Molecular polymorphisms of the ABO locus as informative markers of ancestry in Central Argentina.

Am J Hum Biol 2017 Jul 20;29(4). Epub 2017 Feb 20.

Instituto de Antropología de Córdoba (IDACOR), CONICET/Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, 5000, Argentina.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of molecular polymorphisms of the ABO gene in four population samples from the province of Córdoba, in Central Argentina, and to compare them with other worldwide populations.

Methods: A total of 110 buccal swab samples from autochthonous individuals of Córdoba were typified. Molecular characterization of the allelic variants was performed by the analysis of exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene using PCR-RFLP analysis. Additionally, the Native American AIM O1v542 was characterized by direct sequencing.

Results: The four Córdoba populations did not show significant geographic structure, although the frequency of the O1v542 haplotype, detected in all the populations studied, ranged from 0.019 to 0.222. The principal component analysis based on O allele distribution showed that the populations from Córdoba clustered close to the admixed populations of Santiago and Mexico City, and at intermediate distances between European and Native American populations, while being distant from the African population.

Conclusions: The results demonstrate that the analysis of the ABO system constitutes a useful tool for the study of the genetic structure and evolutionary history of human populations, reflecting accurately the relative contribution of parental continental contribution to the gene pool of admixed populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.22982DOI Listing
July 2017

Analysis of uniparental lineages in two villages of Santiago Del Estero, Argentina, seat of Pueblos de Indios in colonial times.

Hum Biol 2013 Oct;85(5):699-720

Instituto de Antropología de Córdoba, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba 5000, Argentina.

Based on the analysis of the mitochondrial control region and seven biallelic markers of the Y chromosome, we investigated the genetic composition of two rural populations of southern Santiago del Estero, Argentina, that were seats in colonial times of pueblos de indios, a colonial practice that consisted of concentrating the indigenous populations in organized and accessible settlements, to facilitate Christianizing and policing. We found the Native American Y chromosome haplogroup Q1a3a in only 11% (3 of 27) of the males. Haplogroup R, common in European populations, is the most frequent haplogroup in Santiago del Estero (55%). In contrast, the persistence of Native American maternal lineages is extremely high (95%). This finding is most likely due to the low incidence in that region of the 20th century European wave of migration and to the existence of pueblos de indios from 1612 to the first decades of the 19th century. In contrast to archeological records that suggest Santiago del Estero late pre-Hispanic groups were strongly influenced by the Andean world, we did not find genetic evidence in support of significant gene fl ow. On the other hand, these populations share many mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region I (HVRI) haplotypes with other populations from the Sierras Pampeanas (particularly with Córdoba) and the Gran Chaco regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3378/027.085.0504DOI Listing
October 2013

Phylogeography of mitochondrial haplogroup D1: an early spread of subhaplogroup D1j from Central Argentina.

Am J Phys Anthropol 2012 Dec 31;149(4):583-90. Epub 2012 Oct 31.

IDACOR CONICET, Museo de Antropología, Facultad de Filosofía y Humanidades, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba 5000, Argentina.

We analyzed the patterns of variation of haplogroup D1 in central Argentina, including new data and published information from other populations of South America. Almost 28% (107/388) of the individuals sampled in the region belong to haplogroup D1, whereas more than 52% of them correspond to the recently described subhaplogroup D1j (Bodner et al.: Genome Res 22 (2012) 811-820), defined by the presence of additional transitions at np T152C-C16242T-T16311C to the nodal D1 motif. This lineage was found at high frequencies across a wide territory with marked geographical-ecological differences. Additionally, 12 individuals present the mutation C16187T that defines the recently named subhaplogroup D1g (Bodner et al.: Genome Res 22 (2012) 811-820), previously described in populations of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. Based on our results and additional data already published, we postulate that the most likely origin of subhaplogroup D1j is the region of Sierras Pampeanas, which occupies the center and part of the northwestern portion of Argentina. The extensive yet restricted geographical distribution, the relatively large internal diversity, and the absence or low incidence of D1j in other regions of South America suggest the existence of an ancient metapopulation covering the Sierras Pampeanas, being this lineage its genetic signature. Further support for a scenario of local origin for D1j in the Sierras Pampeanas stems from the fact that early derivatives from a putative ancestral lineage carrying the transitions T16311C-T152C have only been found in this region, supporting the hypothesis that it might represent an ancestral motif previous to the appearance of D1j-specific change C16242T.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.22174DOI Listing
December 2012

Activation of the human pregnancy-specific glycoprotein PSG-5 promoter by KLF4 and Sp1.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2006 May 20;343(3):745-53. Epub 2006 Mar 20.

INSERM U.384, Laboratoire de Biochimie, Faculté de Médecine, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France.

Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are major placental proteins thought to be essential for the maintenance of gestation. Little is known about the regulation of expression of the 11 genes encoding these proteins. It was previously demonstrated that Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) and specific-protein 1 (Sp1) bind to conserved sequence within the PSG-5 gene promoter. Informatics analysis revealed the presence of one potential binding site for Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), in the PSG-5 promoter, suggesting a potential transcriptional regulator role for KLF4. Using gene promoter-reporter transfections and X-ChIP assays, we demonstrated that KLF4 is an activator of the PSG-5 promoter by binding to a KLF consensus like binding which includes the Core Promoter Element region (-147/-140). Furthermore, we used previous data showing the binding of Sp1 transcription factor to a GT-box (-443/-437) and co-transfection assays with KLF4 and Sp1 to demonstrate the strong synergic activity of these two factors on the PSG-5 promoter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.03.032DOI Listing
May 2006