Publications by authors named "Rodney Sinclair"

179 Publications

Sublingual tofacitinib for alopecia areata: a roll-over pilot clinical trial and analysis of pharmacokinetics.

Int J Dermatol 2021 May 18. Epub 2021 May 18.

Clinical Trials, Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Tofacitinib is a JAK1/3 inhibitor used off-label to treat alopecia areata (AA). Oral tofacitinib undergoes extensive hepatic metabolism and has numerous drug interactions and a half-life of 3 hours necessitating twice daily dosing. Sublingual delivery bypasses hepatic first-pass metabolism, which may provide pharmacokinetic benefits and reduce gastrointestinal side effects. We investigate sublingual tofacitinib as a novel form of administration in a cohort of treatment-resistant patients. The objective of this work is to assess the efficacy and pharmacokinetics of sublingual tofacitinib in moderate-to-severe AA patients. An open-label, roll-over pilot clinical trial was conducted. Participants were recruited from a preceding trial. All responders (≥50% reduction in Severity of Alopecia Tool [SALT] score, SALT50) in the preceding trial continued on the same treatment (cyclosporine/placebo), whereas nonresponders rolled over to receive open-label sublingual tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily for 12 weeks. Treatment response as reduction in SALT score after 12 weeks (low: 15-29%, medium: 30-49%, good: 50-75%, and high grade: 75-100%) was measured. Pharmacokinetics was analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Eighteen participants completed the trial. Total treatment response to tofacitinib was 37.5%. SALT50 was achieved in 12.5%. The mean improvement in SALT score was 15.57%. Mean maximum plasma concentration was 43.18 ng/ml occurring after 1 hour. Elimination half-life is estimated to be up to 11 hours. An estimated half-life of up to 11 hours may be achieved with sublingual tofacitinib, which is significantly longer than the oral form and may facilitate daily dosing. Larger clinical trials are required to further characterize its pharmacokinetics and efficacy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.15657DOI Listing
May 2021

Shedding light on therapeutics in alopecia and their relevance to COVID-19.

Clin Dermatol 2021 Jan-Feb;39(1):76-83. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

National and International Skin Registry Solutions (NISR), Charles Institute of Dermatology, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; Hair Restoration Blackrock, Dublin, Ireland.

As of July 9, 2020, there were more than 12 million confirmed cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) across the globe, with more than 550,000 deaths. Many European countries, including Belgium, the United Kingdom, Italy, and Spain, have had the highest numbers of fatalities per capita. This indicates the potential for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus to overwhelm even the most advanced health care systems despite extreme societal interventions. Since its emergence, SARS-CoV-2 has disseminated across the globe, affecting the structure of global societies, infrastructure, and economies. Patients with alopecia are a diverse group who, for various indications, are prescribed a number of antimicrobials and antiandrogen treatments in addition to immunomodulatory therapies such as hydroxychloroquine, oral corticosteroids, and a range of broad immunosuppressants. These drugs are being scrutinized for their capacity to potentially affect SARS-CoV-2 outcomes. We examine these treatments and highlight the critical role that patient registries will play in generating real-world evidence to assess their impact on COVID-19 outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2020.12.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7738938PMC
May 2021

Thirty Years (and More) of Hair Research Societies.

Skin Appendage Disord 2021 Feb 8;7(2):90-107. Epub 2021 Feb 8.

The Society for Hair Science Research, Tokyo, Japan.

The contributions of the core hair research societies and their members over the past 30 years have advanced the field of hair research and the understanding and treatment of hair disorders and normal hair growth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000512035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7991570PMC
February 2021

Abrocitinib versus Placebo or Dupilumab for Atopic Dermatitis.

N Engl J Med 2021 03;384(12):1101-1112

From the University Hospital of Bonn, Bonn (T.B.), and University of Lübeck, Lübeck (D.T.) - both in Germany; Oregon Health and Science University, Portland (E.L.S.); George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC (J.I.S.); Toulouse University and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Toulouse, France (C.P.); St. John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (A.E.P.); Osaka Habikino Medical Center, Osaka, Japan (Y.K.); the Department of Dermatology, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei (C.-Y.C.); Pfizer, New York (M.D., P.B., B.M., H.V.); Pfizer, Groton, CT (R.R., J.A., I.I., F.Z.); Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia (R.S.); ForCare Clinical Research, Tampa, FL (S.F.); and Dermedic Jacek Zdybski, Ostrowiec Świętokrzyski, Poland (J.Z.).

Background: The oral Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) inhibitor abrocitinib, which reduces interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 signaling, is being investigated for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Data from trials comparing JAK1 inhibitors with monoclonal antibodies, such as dupilumab, that block interleukin-4 receptors are limited.

Methods: In a phase 3, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned patients with atopic dermatitis that was unresponsive to topical agents or that warranted systemic therapy (in a 2:2:2:1 ratio) to receive 200 mg or 100 mg of abrocitinib orally once daily, 300 mg of dupilumab subcutaneously every other week (after a loading dose of 600 mg), or placebo; all the patients received topical therapy. The primary end points were an Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) response (defined as a score of 0 [clear] or 1 [almost clear] on the IGA [scores range from 0 to 4], with an improvement of ≥2 points from baseline) and an Eczema Area and Severity Index-75 (EASI-75) response (defined as ≥75% improvement from baseline in the score on the EASI [scores range from 0 to 72]) at week 12. The key secondary end points were itch response (defined as an improvement of ≥4 points in the score on the Peak Pruritus Numerical Rating Scale [scores range from 0 to 10]) at week 2 and IGA and EASI-75 responses at week 16.

Results: A total of 838 patients underwent randomization; 226 patients were assigned to the 200-mg abrocitinib group, 238 to the 100-mg abrocitinib group, 243 to the dupilumab group, and 131 to the placebo group. An IGA response at week 12 was observed in 48.4% of patients in the 200-mg abrocitinib group, 36.6% in the 100-mg abrocitinib group, 36.5% in the dupilumab group, and 14.0% in the placebo group (P<0.001 for both abrocitinib doses vs. placebo); an EASI-75 response at week 12 was observed in 70.3%, 58.7%, 58.1%, and 27.1%, respectively (P<0.001 for both abrocitinib doses vs. placebo). The 200-mg dose, but not the 100-mg dose, of abrocitinib was superior to dupilumab with respect to itch response at week 2. Neither abrocitinib dose differed significantly from dupilumab with respect to most other key secondary end-point comparisons at week 16. Nausea occurred in 11.1% of the patients in the 200-mg abrocitinib group and 4.2% of those in the 100-mg abrocitinib group, and acne occurred in 6.6% and 2.9%, respectively.

Conclusions: In this trial, abrocitinib at a dose of either 200 mg or 100 mg once daily resulted in significantly greater reductions in signs and symptoms of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis than placebo at weeks 12 and 16. The 200-mg dose, but not the 100-mg dose, of abrocitinib was superior to dupilumab with respect to itch response at week 2. Neither abrocitinib dose differed significantly from dupilumab with respect to most other key secondary end-point comparisons at week 16. (Funded by Pfizer; JADE COMPARE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT03720470.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2019380DOI Listing
March 2021

A phase 2a randomized, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the oral Janus kinase inhibitors ritlecitinib and brepocitinib in alopecia areata: 24-week results.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Mar 20. Epub 2021 Mar 20.

Pfizer, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune form of hair loss with limited treatments.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Janus kinase inhibitors ritlecitinib and brepocitinib in patients who have AA with ≥ 50% scalp hair loss.

Methods: Patients were randomized to once-daily ritlecitinib, brepocitinib, or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was a 24-week change from baseline in the Severity of Alopecia Tool (SALT) score. The key secondary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving 30% improvement in SALT score (SALT).

Results: The ritlecitinib, brepocitinib, and placebo groups included 48, 47, and 47 patients, respectively. At week 24, least-squares mean difference from placebo in SALT score change from baseline was 31.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 18.8-43.5) for ritlecitinib and 49.2 (95% CI, 36.6-61.7) for brepocitinib (P < .0001 for both comparisons with placebo). SALT was achieved by 50% (90% CI, 38%-62%) of patients receiving ritlecitinib, 64% (90% CI, 51%-75%) receiving brepocitinib, and 2% (90% CI, 0%-9%) receiving placebo. Two patients experienced a serious adverse event (rhabdomyolysis) in the brepocitinib group only.

Limitations: Only a single-dosage regimen of each study drug was included.

Conclusion: Treatment with ritlecitinib or brepocitinib for 24 weeks was efficacious and generally well tolerated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2021.03.050DOI Listing
March 2021

Alopecia Areata Mimicking Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia.

Cureus 2021 Feb 15;13(2):e13361. Epub 2021 Feb 15.

Dermatology, Sinclair Dermatology, Melbourne, AUS.

Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune nonscarring alopecia that has variable clinical patterns, most commonly patchy disease. We report a case of AA with unusual involvement of the frontal hairline, mimicking frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA), a form of scarring alopecia. Dermoscopic findings and response to treatment favored a diagnosis of AA. These findings highlight the major role of trichoscopy as well as the importance of including AA in the differential diagnosis for FFA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.13361DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7971700PMC
February 2021

A Global eDelphi Exercise to Identify Core Domains and Domain Items for the Development of a Global Registry of Alopecia Areata Disease Severity and Treatment Safety (GRASS).

JAMA Dermatol 2021 Apr;157(4):1-11

Clinical Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

Importance: A recent expert consensus exercise emphasized the importance of developing a global network of patient registries for alopecia areata to redress the paucity of comparable, real-world data regarding the effectiveness and safety of existing and emerging therapies for alopecia areata.

Objective: To generate core domains and domain items for a global network of alopecia areata patient registries.

Evidence Review: Sixty-six participants, representing physicians, patient organizations, scientists, the pharmaceutical industry, and pharmacoeconomic experts, participated in a 3-round eDelphi process, culminating in a face-to-face meeting at the World Congress of Dermatology, Milan, Italy, June 14, 2019.

Findings: Ninety-two core data items, across 25 domains, achieved consensus agreement. Twenty further noncore items were retained to facilitate data harmonization in centers that wish to record them. Broad representation across multiple stakeholder groups was sought; however, the opinion of physicians was overrepresented.

Conclusions And Relevance: This study identifies the domains and domain items required to develop a global network of alopecia areata registries. These domains will facilitate a standardized approach that will enable the recording of a comprehensive, comparable data set required to oversee the introduction of new therapies and harness real-world evidence from existing therapies at a time when the alopecia areata treatment paradigm is being radically and positively disrupted. Reuse of similar, existing frameworks in atopic dermatitis, produced by the Treatment of Atopic Eczema (TREAT) Registry Taskforce, increases the potential to reuse existing resources, creates opportunities for comparison of data across dermatology subspecialty disease areas, and supports the concept of data harmonization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2020.5839DOI Listing
April 2021

Safety of low-dose oral minoxidil for hair loss: A multicenter study of 1404 patients.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Jun 24;84(6):1644-1651. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Sinclair Dermatology, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: The major concern regarding the use of low-dose oral minoxidil (LDOM) for the treatment of hair loss is the potential risk of systemic adverse effects.

Objective: To describe the safety of LDOM for the treatment of hair loss in a large cohort of patients.

Methods: Retrospective multicenter study of patients treated with LDOM for at least 3 months for any type of alopecia.

Results: A total of 1404 patients (943 women [67.2%] and 461 men [32.8%]) with a mean age of 43 years (range 8-86) were included. The dose of LDOM was titrated in 1065 patients, allowing the analysis of 2469 different cases. The most frequent adverse effect was hypertrichosis (15.1%), which led to treatment withdrawal in 14 patients (0.5%). Systemic adverse effects included lightheadedness (1.7%), fluid retention (1.3%), tachycardia (0.9%), headache (0.4%), periorbital edema (0.3%), and insomnia (0.2%), leading to drug discontinuation in 29 patients (1.2%). No life-threatening adverse effects were observed.

Limitations: Retrospective design and lack of a control group.

Conclusion: LDOM has a good safety profile as a treatment for hair loss. Systemic adverse effects were infrequent and only 1.7% of patients discontinued treatment owing to adverse effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2021.02.054DOI Listing
June 2021

Identical Alopecia Areata in Identical Twin Sisters.

Int J Trichology 2020 Sep-Oct;12(5):247-248. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Department of Dermatology, KPC Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijt.ijt_120_20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7832170PMC
November 2020

Effective treatment of folliculitis decalvans with cyclosporin: A case series.

Australas J Dermatol 2021 May 6;62(2):e345-e347. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Sinclair Dermatology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajd.13532DOI Listing
May 2021

Treatment of alopecia areata in pre-adolescent children with oral tofacitinib: A retrospective study.

Pediatr Dermatol 2021 Jan 25;38(1):103-108. Epub 2020 Oct 25.

Sinclair Dermatology, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Background: Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune hair loss condition that affects people of all ages. Early age of onset and prolonged disease duration indicate poor prognosis. Janus kinase inhibitors are being investigated in phase 3 clinical trials in adolescents and adults with AA OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of oral tofacitinib in pre-adolescent patients with AA.

Methods: A retrospective review of case records of all pre-adolescent patients with AA treated with oral tofacitinib in a single center between 2018 and 2019.

Results: Fourteen patients were identified, aged 7 to 11 years. Nine patients experienced clinically significant improvement in their SALT (Severity of Alopecia Tool) score. Three patients achieved complete remission (SALT score of 0), seven (63.6%) achieved over 50% improvement in SALT score from baseline. One patient had no change from baseline, another experienced additional hair loss. After an average of 9 months of treatment, the median SALT score improvement was 67.7%. The improvement was similar in patients with baseline SALT scores greater than 50 and those with baseline SALT scores below 10. Adverse events were mild.

Limitations: The retrospective nature of the data, small sample size, lack of a control group, referral bias to a specialist hair center, and concomitant use of other medications including oral minoxidil in all patients.

Conclusion: There is a role for tofacitinib as a systemic therapy in AA and this should be further evaluated in prospective clinical trials in pre-adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.14422DOI Listing
January 2021

Tofacitinib for cutaneous and pulmonary sarcoidosis: A case series.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Feb 16;84(2):581-583. Epub 2020 Oct 16.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.10.016DOI Listing
February 2021

Effective treatment of disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis using a novel topical cholesterol/simvastatin combination cream.

Australas J Dermatol 2021 Feb 27;62(1):93-94. Epub 2020 Sep 27.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajd.13473DOI Listing
February 2021

Female pattern hair loss in men: A distinct clinical variant of androgenetic alopecia.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Jul 17;85(1):260-262. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.09.042DOI Listing
July 2021

The Alopecia Areata Consensus of Experts (ACE) study part II: Results of an international expert opinion on diagnosis and laboratory evaluation for alopecia areata.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Jun 12;84(6):1594-1601. Epub 2020 Sep 12.

Duke Dermatology Clinic-Clinic 3K, Durham, North Carolina.

Background: We previously reported the Alopecia Areata Consensus of Experts study, which presented results of an international expert opinion on treatments for alopecia areata.

Objective: To report the results of the Alopecia Areata Consensus of Experts international expert opinion on diagnosis and laboratory evaluation for alopecia areata.

Methods: Fifty hair experts from 5 continents were invited to participate in a 3-round Delphi process. Consensus threshold was set at greater than or equal to 66%.

Results: Of 148 questions, expert consensus was achieved in 82 (55%). Round 1 consensus was achieved in 10 of 148 questions (7%). Round 2 achieved consensus in 47 of 77 questions (61%). The final face-to-face achieved consensus in 25 of 32 questions (78%). Consensus was greatest for laboratory evaluation (12 of 14 questions [86%]), followed by diagnosis (11 of 14 questions [79%]) of alopecia areata. Overall, etiopathogenesis achieved the least category consensus (31 of 68 questions [46%]).

Limitations: The study had low representation from Africa, South America, and Asia.

Conclusion: There is expert consensus on aspects of epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, laboratory evaluation, and prognostic indicators of alopecia areata. The study also highlights areas where future clinical research could be directed to address unresolved hypotheses in alopecia areata patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.09.028DOI Listing
June 2021

Novel "After Minoxidil" spray improves topical minoxidil compliance and hair style manageability.

J Cosmet Dermatol 2020 Oct 26;19(10):2647-2649. Epub 2020 Aug 26.

Applied Biology, Irvine, CA, USA.

Background: Topical minoxidil is the only US FDA-approved drug for the treatment of female pattern hair loss (FPHL). While the safety profile of topical minoxidil is excellent, the efficacy of minoxidil in hair growth is extremely low. A recent survey of 8000 people observed that only 4% of hair loss patients using an over-the-counter minoxidil were very satisfied with their results. In contrast, in clinical studies with an intervening physician, approximately 30%-40% of patients demonstrate an appreciable benefit. Compliance with topical drug regimens is often a major obstacle, limiting their effectiveness. Topical minoxidil leaves a greasy residue on the hair, which is especially problematic for women who do not wash their hair daily.

Aims: We set out to develop an "After Minoxidil" companion spray to minoxidil that removes residual minoxidil from the hair, where it is not needed, yet leaves minoxidil on the scalp where it is required. We hypothesized that improving the cosmetic properties of minoxidil would improve patient compliance with the drug and subsequently improve clinical outcomes.

Methods: A cohort of 20 FPHL patients was recruited to use the novel "After Minoxidil" spray and report changes in hair quality on a Likert scale.

Results: In our cohort of FPHL patients, the novel "After Minoxidil" spray restored ease of styling and reduced greasiness to preminoxidil level in 65% and 85% of subjects, respectively. The average reduction in perceived greasiness was 78%. Importantly, 70% of subjects interviewed stated they would likely continue to use the minoxidil and "After Minoxidil" treatment regimen for 6 months, vs 0% willing to use minoxidil alone.

Conclusion: The novel "After Minoxidil" spray improved ease of hair styling and reduced greasiness following application of topical minoxidil; thus, the novel "After Minoxidil" spray may help improve drug compliance and efficacy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.13630DOI Listing
October 2020

Reversibility of alopecia caused by chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

Int J Dermatol 2020 Dec 17;59(12):e437-e438. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.15148DOI Listing
December 2020

Duration of remission after recovery from the first episode of alopecia areata.

Int J Dermatol 2020 Nov 6;59(11):e388-e389. Epub 2020 Aug 6.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.15102DOI Listing
November 2020

Efficacy and safety of abrocitinib in adults and adolescents with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (JADE MONO-1): a multicentre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial.

Lancet 2020 07;396(10246):255-266

Pfizer, Groton, CT, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Abrocitinib, an oral selective Janus kinase 1 inhibitor, was effective and well tolerated in adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in a phase 2b trial. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of abrocitinib monotherapy in adolescents and adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.

Methods: In this multicentre, double-blind, randomised phase 3 trial (JADE MONO-1), patients (aged ≥12 years) with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (Investigator Global Assessment score ≥3, Eczema Area and Severity Index [EASI] score ≥16, percentage of body surface area affected ≥10%, and Peak Pruritus Numerical Rating Scale score ≥4) with a bodyweight of 40 kg or more, were enrolled at 69 sites in Australia, Canada, Europe, and the USA. Patients were randomly assigned (2:2:1) to oral abrocitinib 100 mg, abrocitinib 200 mg, or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Randomisation was done using an interactive response technology system, stratified by baseline disease severity and age. Patients, investigators, and the funder of the study were masked to study treatment. The coprimary endpoints were the proportion of patients who had achieved an Investigator Global Assessment response (score of 0 [clear] or 1 [almost clear] with a ≥2-grade improvement from baseline), and the proportion of patients who achieved at least a 75% improvement in EASI score from baseline (EASI-75) score, both assessed at week 12. Efficacy was assessed in the full analysis set, which included all randomised patients who received at least one dose of study medication. Safety was assessed in all randomised patients. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03349060.

Findings: Between Dec 7, 2017, and March 26, 2019, 387 patients were enrolled: 156 were assigned to abrocitinib 100 mg, 154 to abrocitinib 200 mg, and 77 to placebo. All enrolled patients received at least one dose of study treatment and thus were evaluable for 12-week efficacy. Of the patients with available data for the coprimary endpoints at week 12, the proportion of patients who had achieved an Investigator Global Assessment response was significantly higher in the abrocitinib 100 mg group than in the placebo group (37 [24%] of 156 patients vs six [8%] of 76 patients; p=0·0037) and in the abrocitinib 200 mg group compared with the placebo group (67 [44%] of 153 patients vs six [8%] of 76 patients; p<0·0001). Of the patients with available data for the coprimary endpoints at week 12, compared with the placebo group, the proportion of patients who had achieved an EASI-75 response was significantly higher in the abrocitinib 100 mg group (62 [40%] of 156 patients vs nine [12%] of 76 patients; p<0·0001) and abrocitinib 200 mg group (96 [63%] of 153 patients vs nine [12%] of 76 patients; p<0·0001). Adverse events were reported in 108 (69%) of 156 patients in the abrocitinib 100 mg group, 120 (78%) of 154 patients in the abrocitinib 200 mg group, and 44 (57%) of 77 patients in the placebo group. Serious adverse events were reported in five (3%) of 156 patients in the abrocitinib 100 mg group, five (3%) of 154 patients in the abrocitinib 200 mg group, and three (4%) of 77 patients in the placebo group. No treatment-related deaths were reported.

Interpretation: Monotherapy with oral abrocitinib once daily was effective and well tolerated in adolescents and adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.

Funding: Pfizer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30732-7DOI Listing
July 2020

Folliculitis decalvans responsive to tofacitinib: A case series.

Dermatol Ther 2020 11 4;33(6):e13968. Epub 2020 Aug 4.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.13968DOI Listing
November 2020

The Bairnsdale ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans) in an urban Victorian practice: A case series.

Australas J Dermatol 2020 Nov 23;61(4):376-377. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajd.13361DOI Listing
November 2020

Recalcitrant lichen planopilaris and frontal fibrosing alopecia responding to tildrakizumab.

Dermatol Ther 2020 07 8;33(4):e13694. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Lichen planopilaris (LPP) and frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) are lymphocytic, cicatricial alopecias. Clinically, LPP presents with multifocal patchy alopecia, while FFA, considered a variant of LPP, results in hairline recession. Frontal recession in FFA may progress as far as the mid-scalp and infrequently beyond. Treatment to arrest the inflammatory process can be challenging and response variable. We report a case of recalcitrant lichen planopilaris and frontal fibrosing alopecia demonstrating significant clinical improvement after four doses of the interleukin-23 monoclonal antibody tildrakizumab.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.13694DOI Listing
July 2020

Repigmentation of acrofacial vitiligo with subcutaneous tildrakizumab.

Australas J Dermatol 2020 Nov 21;61(4):e446-e448. Epub 2020 May 21.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajd.13346DOI Listing
November 2020

A preliminary observation: Male pattern hair loss among hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Spain - A potential clue to the role of androgens in COVID-19 severity.

J Cosmet Dermatol 2020 Jul 23;19(7):1545-1547. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

A preliminary observation of high frequency of male pattern hair loss among admitted COVID-19 patients and suggest that androgen expression might be a clue to COVID-19 severity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.13443DOI Listing
July 2020

Safety of oral bicalutamide in female pattern hair loss: A retrospective review of 316 patients.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 11 22;83(5):1478-1479. Epub 2020 Mar 22.

Sinclair Dermatology, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Dermatology, Epworth Healthcare, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.03.034DOI Listing
November 2020