Publications by authors named "Roderik Metz"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cost Effectiveness of Endovascular Revascularisation vs. Exercise Therapy for Intermittent Claudication Due to Iliac Artery Obstruction.

Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg 2022 03 9;63(3):430-437. Epub 2022 Feb 9.

Department of Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Cardiovascular Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Objective: To compare cost effectiveness of endovascular revascularisation (ER) and supervised exercise therapy (SET) as primary treatment for patients with intermittent claudication (IC) due to iliac artery obstruction.

Methods: Cost utility analysis from a restricted societal perspective and time horizon of 12 months. Patients were included in a multicentre randomised controlled trial (SUPER study, NCT01385774, NTR2648) which compared effectiveness of ER and SET. Health status and health related quality of life (HRQOL) were measured using the Euroqol 5 dimensions 3 levels (EQ5D-3L) and VascuQol-25-NL. Incremental costs were determined per allocated treatment and use of healthcare during follow up. Effectiveness of treatment was determined in quality adjusted life years (QALYs). The difference between treatment groups was calculated by an incremental cost utility ratio (ICER).

Results: Some 240 patients were included, and complete follow up was available for 206 patients (ER 111 , SET 95). The mean costs for patients allocated to ER were €4 031 and €2 179 for SET, a mean difference of €1 852 (95% bias corrected and accelerated [bca] bootstrap confidence interval 1 185 - 2 646). The difference in QALYs during follow up was 0.09 (95% bcaCI 0.04 - 0.13) in favour of ER. The ICER per QALY was €20 805 (95% bcaCI 11 053 - 45 561). The difference in VascuQol sumscore was 0.64 (95% bcaCI 0.39 - 0.91), again in favour of ER.

Conclusion: ER as a primary treatment, results in slightly better health outcome and higher QALYs and HRQOL during 12 months of follow up. Although these differences are statistically significant, clinical relevance must be discussed due to the small differences and relatively high cost of ER as primary treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvs.2021.10.048DOI Listing
March 2022

Survival and Living Situation After Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm Repair in Octogenarians.

Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg 2021 03 6;61(3):375-381. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Department of Vascular Surgery, Dijklander Ziekenhuis, Hoorn, The Netherlands; Department of Vascular Surgery, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Objective: To determine the 30 day and one year mortality and post-operative living situation in octogenarians treated for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA).

Methods: A retrospective study was performed at four centres in the Netherlands. All consecutive patients aged ≥80 years, presenting with a rAAA between January 2013 and October 2018, were included. The primary outcomes were post-operative living situation and one year mortality.

Results: In total, 157 patients were included. Forty-seven received palliative care and 110 patients had surgery. After endovascular or open repair, the one year mortality rate was 50.0%. The 30 day mortality rate was 40.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 27-55) and 31.7% (95% CI 20-44), for endovascular and open repair, respectively (p = .32). Sixty-five per cent of survivors were discharged home, while 34.8% went to a nursing home for rehabilitation. Of the surviving patients, 82.6% went back to living in their pre-rupture home situation. Of the investigated variables, only a high body mass index proved a significant predictor of death at 30 days and one year. Compared with operated patients, patients turned down for surgery were older (mean age 87.5 ± 3.8 vs. 84.0 ± 3.5; p < .001), lived significantly more often in a nursing home (odds ratio 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.03; p < .001), were more often dependent (odds ratio 3.69, 95% CI 2.31-5.88; p < .001) and had a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on arrival (odds ratio 0.42, 95% CI 0.25-0.69; p = .002). All palliative patients died within three days.

Conclusion: Overall treatment outcomes showed that octogenarians should not be denied surgery based on age alone, as half of the octogenarians that undergo surgical treatment are still alive one year after rAAA repair. In addition, > 80% returned to their own home after rehabilitation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejvs.2020.11.023DOI Listing
March 2021

Aortic arch thrombus caused by nitrous oxide abuse.

J Vasc Surg Cases Innov Tech 2018 Jun 12;4(2):80-82. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Department of Vascular Surgery, Diakonessenhuis, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Nitrous oxide is a recreational drug gaining in popularity for its deemed innocence. However, side effects have recently been reported. In this case, a patient suffered major aortic arch thrombus resulting in arterial occlusion of his arm and temporary cerebral infarction and later deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. No common causes for thrombus in this high-flow vessel were identified. The authors state that the patient's chronic nitrous oxide abuse might have led to this thrombus, although it has never been described previously. This hypothesis is supported with laboratory tests at several presentations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvscit.2018.01.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6013293PMC
June 2018

[Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome: suggestions for diagnostic and therapeutic clues].

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2011 ;155(18):A2580

Erasmus Medisch Centrum, afd. Heelkunde, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

The popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is a rare cause of lower-leg claudication due to an anatomic anomaly along the course of the popliteal artery and sometimes, the vein. In the absence of an anatomic anomaly, it is termed 'functional entrapment'. We present 3 patients: a 13-year-old boy with PAES caused by an anomaly of a tendon, a 46-year-old soldier with functional PAES and a 36-year-old male with venous entrapment. Doppler or duplex imaging in patients with PAES generally show no abnormalities, unless entrapment is provoked by plantar or dorsiflexion of the foot. When positive, imaging by CT or MR angiography is advised. In healthy individuals, however, vascular occlusion or stenosis on imaging during provocation testing is considered a physiological finding. Surgery is justified in symptomatic as well as asymptomatic patients with an anatomic anomaly. Surgical exploration of the popliteal fossa should also be considered in patients with functional entrapment, since continuing entrapment may lead to damage of the arterial wall.
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September 2011

Effect of complications after minimally invasive surgical repair of acute achilles tendon ruptures: report on 211 cases.

Am J Sports Med 2011 Apr 2;39(4):820-4. Epub 2011 Feb 2.

Department of Surgery, Diakonessenhuis, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Background: Complications of acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment are considered to negatively influence outcome, but the relevance of these effects is largely unknown.

Purpose: The Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) was used to determine level of disability in patients with minimally invasive surgical Achilles tendon rupture repair with a complicated postoperative course.

Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.

Methods: The charts of 340 consecutive patients treated for an acute Achilles tendon rupture by minimally invasive surgical repair were reviewed. Complications were categorized as rerupture, severe wound infection, sural nerve injury, and other. Level of disability was evaluated by the 10-item ATRS with a sum score of minimum 0 to maximum 100 points.

Results: A total of 211 patients returned a completed questionnaire: mean follow-up was 6.2 years (range, 3-10 years). Mean ATRS for all 211 patients was 84 (95% confidence interval: 82, 87). The mean ATRS for the 135 (64%) uncomplicated cases was 89 of 100 points, 71 points for the 17 (8%) patients with a rerupture (95% confidence interval: 63, 79; P < .0001), 79 points for the 41 patients (19%) with a sural nerve injury (95% confidence interval: 74, 85; P = .0008), and 75 points for the 17 patients (8%) with another complication (95% confidence interval: 67, 83; P = .001). Of these other complications, 13 patients (6%) suffered a wound-healing complication considered minor. Their average ATRS score was 80 points (95% confidence interval: 71, 88.7; P = .0445). One patient suffered a severe wound infection as well, scoring 28 of 100 points. Rerupture significantly increased the risk of quitting or changing sport participation on the long term.

Conclusion: Long-term outcome after minimally invasive Achilles tendon rupture repair is excellent. Rerupture and severe wound infection are the most important complications with lasting negative effect on outcome. It justifies the use of rerupture as a relevant outcome measure in treatment evaluation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546510392012DOI Listing
April 2011

Persistent disability despite sufficient calf muscle strength after rerupture of surgically treated acute achilles tendon ruptures.

Foot Ankle Spec 2011 Apr 1;4(2):77-81. Epub 2010 Dec 1.

Department of Surgery, Erasmus Medical Centre, H8-zuid (k802), Postbus 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Rerupture after treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture is considered a serious complication. Yet data on long-term outcome after rerupture are limited. This study evaluated outcome after rerupture and compares it to a reference of uncomplicated cases. Thirteen patients with a rerupture following minimally invasive surgical Achilles tendon rupture repair were evaluated using Leppilahti score and resumption of work and sport. Mean follow-up was 8.7 years. Results were compared with a reference group of 23 uncomplicated cases with a follow-up of at least 1 year. The study was designed as a follow-up study. The relative risk for a fair/poor outcome by Leppilahti score after a rerupture when compared with uncomplicated cases is 2.83 (95% confidence interval=1.17-6.87; P=.0185). Although rerupture did not affect ultimate resumption of professional life, the relative risk for quitting sport or resuming sport at a lower level after a rerupture is 3.33 (95% confidence interval=1.71-6.51; P=.0001). In contrast, the plantar flexion strength deficit is 5% to 10% in the rerupture group and up to 20% in the reference group. Despite sufficient recovery of calf muscle strength, rerupture after acute Achilles tendon rupture treatment results in significant long-term functional disabilities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938640010388412DOI Listing
April 2011

Recovery of calf muscle strength following acute achilles tendon rupture treatment: a comparison between minimally invasive surgery and conservative treatment.

Foot Ankle Spec 2009 Oct 4;2(5):219-26. Epub 2009 Sep 4.

Department of Surgery, Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

The aim of this study was to measure the effect of treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures on calf muscle strength recovery. Eighty-three patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were randomly allocated to either minimally invasive surgery with functional after-treatment or conservative treatment by functional bracing. Calf muscle strength using isokinetic testing was evaluated at 3 months and after 6 or more months posttreatment. To exclusively investigate the effect of treatment on outcome, the authors excluded patients with major complications from the analysis. In 31 of 39 patients in the surgical treatment group and 25 of 34 patients in the conservative treatment group, isokinetic strength tests were performed. In the analysis of differences in mean peak torque, no statistically significant differences were found between surgery and conservative treatment, except for plantar flexion strength at 90 degrees per second at the second measurement, favoring conservative treatment. After 8 to 10 months follow- up, loss of plantar flexion strength was still present in the injured leg in both treatment groups. In conclusion, isokinetic muscle strength testing did not detect a statistically significant difference between minimally invasive surgical treatment with functional after-treatment and conservative treatment by functional bracing of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938640009348338DOI Listing
October 2009

[The acute Achilles tendon rupture: new insights in the treatment].

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2009 ;153:A235

Diakonessenhuis, afd. Heelkunde, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The acute Achilles tendon rupture is a typical sports injury, which most commonly occurs in men. The diagnosis is easy to make but there is no consensus on best treatment: surgical or conservative treatment? In the case of surgical repair, the risk of a re-rupture is considerably smaller compared to conservative treatment by cast immobilisation. The results of conservative treatment using a functional brace are not good enough to serve as a good alternative for surgery. If surgical treatment is chosen, minimally invasive surgery should be performed. The risk of re-rupture is the same as in open reconstruction but the risk of, a possibly severe, wound infection is smaller. Independent of the suture technique chosen, the postoperative rehabilitation should be functional as opposed to full immobilisation. Too little is currently known about the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture for a broadly supported treatment guideline to be realised.
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November 2009

Insufficient Evidence for Routine Use of Thromboprophylaxis in Ambulatory Patients with an Isolated Lower Leg Injury Requiring Immobilization: Results of a Meta-Analysis.

Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg 2009 Apr 8;35(2):169-75. Epub 2008 Dec 8.

University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: There are no generally accepted guidelines for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in ambulatory patients requiring immobilization after an isolated lower leg injury. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pharmacological interventions for preventing VTE in these patients.

Study Design: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Materials And Methods: We searched PubMed/Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for trials with random allocation of thromboprophylaxis, notably low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) versus no prophylaxis or placebo, in ambulatory patients with below-knee or lower leg (including the knee joint) immobilization. Outcome was analyzed using MIX to calculate the pooled risk ratio/relative risk (RR) for each outcome, along with its 95% confidence interval (CI).

Results: The RR of asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was 0.66 (95% CI 0.44; 1.02) for below-knee immobilization and 0.51 (95% CI 0.37; 0.70) for lower leg immobilization. Low molecular weight heparin versus no prophylaxis or placebo was evaluated. The incidence of symptomatic DVT and PE was too low to show any statistically significant difference between thromboprophylaxis and controls in both groups. Although only one adverse bleeding event was considered to bemajor, the RR for any adverse bleeding event was 1.94 (95% CI 1.03; 3.67).

Conclusion: There is insufficient evidence to warrant routine use of thromboprophylaxis in ambulatory patients with below-knee or lower leg immobilization after an isolated lower leg injury. The incidence of symptomatic VTE is too low to show a relevant clinical benefit from thromboprophylaxis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00068-008-8015-yDOI Listing
April 2009

Acute Achilles tendon rupture: minimally invasive surgery versus non operative treatment, with immediate full weight bearing. Design of a randomized controlled trial.

BMC Musculoskelet Disord 2007 Nov 6;8:108. Epub 2007 Nov 6.

Department of Surgery, University Medical Centre Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: We present the design of an open randomized multi-centre study on surgical versus conservative treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. The study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of conservative treatment in reducing complications when treating acute Achilles tendon rupture.

Methods/design: At least 72 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture will be randomized to minimally invasive surgical repair followed by functional rehabilitation using tape bandage or conservative treatment followed by functional rehabilitation with use of a functional bracing system. Both treatment arms use a 7 weeks post-rupture rehabilitation protocol. Four hospitals in the Netherlands will participate. Primary end-point will be reduction in complications other than re-rupture. Secondary end-point will be re-rupturing, time off work, sporting activity post rupture, functional outcome by Leppilahti score and patient satisfaction. Patient follow-up will be 12 month.

Discussion: By making this design study we wish to contribute to more profound research on AT rupture treatment and prevent publication bias for this open-labelled randomized trial.

Trial Registration: ISRCTN50141196.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2474-8-108DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2194676PMC
November 2007

Aortoesophageal fistula successfully treated by endovascular stent-graft.

Ann Thorac Surg 2006 Sep;82(3):1117-9

Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The case of a patient with an aortoesophageal fistula is presented, which was caused by ingestion of a chicken bone and was treated by endovascular stent-graft placement and esophagectomy with early reconstruction. The diagnostic and therapeutic options and challenges encountered in treating an aortoesophageal fistula are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.01.091DOI Listing
September 2006
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