Publications by authors named "Rod J Rohrich"

596 Publications

A Man for All Seasons.

Authors:
Rod J Rohrich

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 May;147(5):1255

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007907DOI Listing
May 2021

How to Keep Your Cervical Spine Safe for Your Entire Career.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 May;147(5):1248-1250

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute and the Institute of Aesthetic Medicine.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007905DOI Listing
May 2021

Promoting Health Policy Research in Plastic Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 May;147(5):1242-1244

From the Department of Surgery, Section of Plastic Surgery, Michigan Medicine; and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007903DOI Listing
May 2021

Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: How Evidence-Based Medicine Has Transformed Plastic Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 May;147(5):1235-1241

From the Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, and the Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University; Emory University; the Emory Aesthetic Center and Emory Ambulatory Surgery Center; and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007913DOI Listing
May 2021

The "Management of Patients with Textured Implants" Supplement.

Authors:
Rod J Rohrich

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 May;147(5S):1S-2S

From the Editor-in-Chief, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000008048DOI Listing
May 2021

Reply: Millennial Leaders: Ready or Not, Here They Come.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 May;147(5):913e-914e

Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor Scott & White Health, Dallas, Texas.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007864DOI Listing
May 2021

Reply: Millennial Leaders: Ready or Not, Here They Come.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 May;147(5):908e-909e

Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor Scott & White Health, Dallas, Texas.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007862DOI Listing
May 2021

Level of Evidence on Platelet-rich Plasma in Plastic Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2021 Apr 15;9(4):e3379. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Department of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.

Background: Despite the increased popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in plastic surgery, there is no detailed analysis on the level of evidence on PRP use in plastic surgery. As the number of applications of PRP in plastic surgery increases, it is important for plastic surgeons to understand the scientific and validated evidence behind its use. Therefore, we performed a literature review to identify current level of evidence on platelet-rich plasma in plastic surgery.

Methods: We performed a computerized search of platelet-rich plasma in plastic surgery using the MEDLINE, Cochran Library, and EMBASE databases. Data regarding the type of study, PRP application, and outcomes were collected. Then, the level of evidence was assigned using the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Level of Evidence Rating.

Results: Our search identified 105 articles, and about 78.1% of studies were lower-quality studies: 37 level-III articles (35.2%), 32 level-IV articles (30.5%), and 13 level-V articles (12.4%). There were only 6 level-I articles and 17 level-II studies. Level-I studies were on facial rejuvenation using a laser, carpal tunnel release, cleft lip repair, trauma wounds, breast reconstruction using latissimus dorsi, and hair regrowth.

Conclusions: Our review of the literature shows that the level of evidence on PRP use in plastic surgery is low (21.9%). Nevertheless, we believe level-III to level-V studies are still valuable, as performing high-level quality studies in plastic surgery is difficult due to variability in surgical techniques, experiences, and materials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000003379DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8049385PMC
April 2021

Rhinosurgery during and after the COVID-19 Pandemic: International Consensus Conference Statement on Preliminary Perioperative Safety Measures.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 05;147(5):1087-1095

From the Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, Aesthetic, and Hand Surgery, Basel University Hospital, University of Basel; the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, UZ Leuven Campus Gasthuisberg; the Division of Head and Neck Department, Otorhinolaryngology Unit, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute; private practice; the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital; the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University College Hospital; the Clinic for Plastic Surgery; the Department of Facial Plastic Surgery, Marienhospital; the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Klinikum Karlsruhe; the Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine; Klinik für Hals-, Nasen-, Ohren- und Gesichtschirurgie, Kantonsspital Luzern; the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII.

Background: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has widely affected rhinosurgery, given the high risk of contagion and the elective nature of the aesthetic procedure, generating many questions on how to ensure safety. The Science and Research Committee of the Rhinoplasty Society of Europe aimed at preparing consensus recommendations on safe rhinosurgery in general during the COVID-19 pandemic by appointing an international panel of experts also including delegates of The Rhinoplasty Society.

Methods: A Zoom meeting was performed with a panel of 14 international leading experts in rhinosurgery. During 3.5 hours, four categories of questions on preoperative safety measures in private practice and outpatient clinics, patient assessment before and during surgery, and legal issues were presented by four chairs and discussed by the expert group. Afterward, the panelists were requested to express an online, electronic vote on each category and question. The panel's recommendations were based on current evidence and expert opinions. The resulting report was circulated in an iterative open e-mail process until consensus was obtained.

Results: Consensus was obtained in several important points on how to safely restart performing rhinosurgery in general. Preliminary recommendations with different levels of agreement were prepared and condensed in a bundle of safety measures.

Conclusion: The implementation of the panel's recommendations may improve safety of rhinoplasty by avoiding operating on nondetected COVID-19 patients and minimizing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus spread in outpatient clinics and operating rooms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007868DOI Listing
May 2021

Management of Patients with Textured Surface Breast Implants.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Apr;147(4):607e-612e

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Department of Plastic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center.

Summary: The purpose of this special topic article is to present an evidence-based approach and provide recommendations for the management of both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with textured surface breast implants. There are currently no scientific data to support complete removal of a benign capsule. When unnecessary capsulectomies are performed, the patient is at higher risk for developing postoperative complications. Ultimately, the decision to keep, exchange, or remove breast implants is the patient's decision and the procedure should be performed only by a qualified surgeon.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007750DOI Listing
April 2021

Not All Breast Explants Are Equal: Contemporary Strategies in Breast Explantation Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Apr;147(4):808-818

From Northwell Health, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell; CaloAesthetic Plastic Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, University of Louisville; Division of Plastic Surgery, University of Kentucky; M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas in Houston; Partners in Plastic Surgery; the National Center for Plastic Surgery; and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Summary: Breast implant removal and replacement has been a common secondary breast procedure in the long-term maintenance of breast augmentation, but more recently growing concerns about silicone-related systemic illness, breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL), and changing perceptions of aesthetic beauty have seen breast implant removal without replacement become increasingly requested by patients. Explantation can be challenging, especially when performed with a total capsulectomy. Currently, there is no evidence regarding whether a partial or total capsulectomy has any effect on BIA-ALCL risk mitigation in patients that have textured implants without disease. Total capsulectomy with incomplete resection of a mass can contribute to hyperprogression of BIA-ALCL and death. There have also been cases of BIA-ALCL diagnosed years after removal of the textured device and "total capsulectomy." Therefore, the common practice of simple prophylactic capsulectomy in a textured implant to mitigate future disease has not been established and at the current time should be discouraged. In addition, aesthetic outcomes can be quite variable, and patients should have appropriate preoperative counseling regarding the indications and contraindications for explantation, associated risks, financial implications, and postoperative appearance. The authors review salient aspects related to the planning and management of breast implant removal.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007784DOI Listing
April 2021

SMAS Advancement with Fat Enhancement (SAFE) Lift.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2021 Feb 1;9(2):e3364. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000003364DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7929536PMC
February 2021

75th Anniversary: The Changing Face of Patient Safety in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Mar;147(3):789-791

From Johns Hopkins Hospital; Dalhousie University; and Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007698DOI Listing
March 2021

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the Evolution of Cosmetic Surgery Education.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Mar;147(3):783-788

From private practice and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007697DOI Listing
March 2021

Four-Step Spreader Flap: The Pull-Twist-Turn Technique.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Mar;147(3):608-612

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and Careaga Plastic Surgery.

Summary: The spreader (or autospreader) flap offers an alternative to the traditional spreader graft in reconstructing the dorsal midvault and preserving internal valve function. This is of particular importance after an aggressive dorsal hump reduction, which has the potential to result in an inverted-V deformity, dorsal narrowing, or saddle-nose deformity. In this article, the authors describe a four-step spreader flap technique that offers a simple, reproducible method of shaping the dorsal midvault while preserving internal valve function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007661DOI Listing
March 2021

: A Dream Turning to Reality.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 Dec 11;8(12):e3395. Epub 2020 Dec 11.

Private Practice.

Supplemental Digital Content is available in the text.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000003395DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7787301PMC
December 2020

Evidence-Based Innovations Driving the Future of Plastic Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 01;147(1):258-261

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Division of Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery, Duke University Medical Center.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007502DOI Listing
January 2021

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at 75: Stronger, Better, and Always Changing.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 01;147(1):249-257

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and PRS Global Open Editorial Office, and private practice.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007516DOI Listing
January 2021

Platelet-Rich Plasma: Evolving Role in Plastic Surgery.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 01;147(1):219-230

From the Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine; and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Background: The use of platelet-rich plasma has emerged as one of the most desired nonsurgical treatments for facial rejuvenation and hair restoration. It has grown to encompass a wide variety of applications within the field of plastic surgery, including its use in combination with microneedling, laser, and fat-grafting procedures.

Methods: In this article, the authors aim to (1) describe the preparation process of platelet-rich plasma; (2) discuss the proposed science behind platelet-rich plasma with regard to its evolving role in hair restoration and facial rejuvenation; and (3) highlight the recent literature examining its widespread use.

Results: Based on the available literature, there is a therapeutic advantage to the use of platelet-rich plasma as a single treatment modality for alopecia and skin rejuvenation and in combination with laser skin treatment and fat grafting. There is, however, a considerable amount of variability in the processing, preparation, and treatment modalities.

Conclusions: Despite a lack of standardized protocols for platelet-rich plasma preparation and a scarcity of large-scale studies with long-term follow-up, there is convincing evidence with objective measurement modalities that display positive outcomes after treatment for skin rejuvenation, hair regrowth, wound healing, and fat graft take.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007509DOI Listing
January 2021

Prediction of Facial Aging Using the Facial Fat Compartments.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Jan;147(1S-2):38S-42S

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Summary: Facial aging is a multifactorial process governed by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors that impart a change to each component of the facial anatomy. Our understanding of the science of aging has evolved over the years. A recent and valuable addition to our understanding is the knowledge of both the superficial and deep facial fat compartments. The deep compartments provide structural support to the midface and the superficial fat compartments. Understanding the anatomy and the spectrum of their changes helps to tailor management options for facial rejuvenation. The authors present a review on facial aging as it relates to these fat compartments and provide a management algorithm based on the longitudinal changes seen during aging.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007624DOI Listing
January 2021

The "Science of Aging" Supplement.

Authors:
Rod J Rohrich

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Jan;147(1S-2):1S-2S

From the Editor-in-Chief, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007631DOI Listing
January 2021

The "Soft-Tissue Wound Management: Current Applications of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation" Supplement.

Authors:
Rod J Rohrich

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 01;147(1S-1):1S-2S

From the Editor-in-Chief, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007629DOI Listing
January 2021

Virtual Interviews During COVID-19: The New Norm for Residency Applicants.

Ann Plast Surg 2021 04;86(4):367-370

Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SAP.0000000000002662DOI Listing
April 2021

Evidence-Based Performance Measures for Rhinoplasty: A Multidisciplinary Performance Measure Set.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2021 Feb;147(2):222e-230e

From the Johns Hopkins Hospital; Fedok Plastic Surgery and Laser Center; the American Society of Plastic Surgeons; The Plastic Surgery Clinic; Westlake Dermatology and Cosmetic Surgery; The Center for Facial Restoration; the University of Pennsylvania; the University of Michigan; the University of Southern California; Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School; the University of Wisconsin; private practice; Stanford University; Case Western Reserve University; TLKM Plastic Surgery; Yale School of Medicine; the University of California, Davis; and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

Summary: The American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery commissioned the multidisciplinary Rhinoplasty Performance Measure Development Work Group to identify and draft quality measures for the care of patients undergoing both functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty. One outcome measure and three process measures were identified. The outcome looked at patient satisfaction with rhinoplasty procedures. The process measures look at motivations and expectations of the procedure, airway assessment, and nonnarcotic shared decision-making strategies for pain management. All measures in this report were approved by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Quality and Performance Measures Work Group and Executive Committee, and the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Rhinoplasty Society, and the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. The Work Group recommends the use of these measures for quality initiatives, Continuing Medical Education, Maintenance of Certification, Qualified Clinical Data Registry reporting, and national quality reporting programs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007598DOI Listing
February 2021

Crisis Leadership.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2020 12;146(6):1433-1434

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; Baylor College of Medicine; private practice; and University of Michigan.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007388DOI Listing
December 2020

Systematic Surgical Approach to Alar Base Surgery in Rhinoplasty.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2020 12;146(6):1259-1267

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern.

In an era with smartphone photography and social media (specifically, "selfies"), basal view aesthetics is becoming increasingly important. Achieving balance between the nasal base and the remainder of the nose and face while preserving or restoring external valve function are essential to a successful rhinoplasty. Without a systematic approach to the nasal base, it is more difficult to achieve an ideal outcome from both aesthetic and functional standpoints. This article outlines an organized and systematic approach to the nasal base, beginning with comprehensive nasofacial analysis. The authors continue by describing idealized basal view aesthetics and provide a treatment algorithm for common deformities that include alar flaring and a wide nasal base. The authors attempt to provide a comprehensive approach to the treatment of the nasal base by discussing the implications of treating columellar deformities, tip positioning, or alar-columellar discrepancies on the overall aesthetics of the lower third of the nose. Furthermore, technical considerations are given for common surgical maneuvers addressing the alar base to help guide treatment and prevent complications such as poor scarring, notching, nostril asymmetry or stenosis (external valve obstruction), and alar deformities ("parenthesis" or "bowling pin"), to name a few.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007385DOI Listing
December 2020

The Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine: Current Trials, Novel Technologies, and Future Directions.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 Oct 28;8(10):e3206. Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has presented a major threat to public health worldwide alongside unprecedented global economic and social implications. In the absence of a "gold standard" treatment, the rapid development of a safe and effective vaccine is considered the most promising way to control the pandemic. In recent years, traditional vaccine technologies have seemed insufficient to provide global protection against the rapid spread of emerging pandemics. Therefore, the establishment of novel approaches that are independent of whole pathogen cultivation, cost-effective, and able to be rapidly developed and produced on a large scale are of paramount importance for global health. This article summarizes the current efforts to develop a COVID-19 vaccine, including the ongoing and future anticipated clinical trials. We also provide plastic and reconstructive surgeons with insight into the novel technologies currently utilized for COVID-19 vaccine development, focusing on the very promising viral-vector-based and gene-based vaccine technologies. Each platform has its own advantages and disadvantages related to its efficacy and ability to induce certain immune responses, manufacturing capacity, and safety for human use. Once the fundamental key challenges have been addressed for viral-vector-based and gene-based vaccines, these novel technologies may become helpful in winning the fight against COVID-19 and transforming the future of health care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000003206DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7647601PMC
October 2020

Aesthetic Applications of Radiofrequency: Lymphatic and Perfusion Assessment.

Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open 2020 Oct 26;8(10):e3193. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

‡Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute, Dallas, Tex.

Background: The use of radiofrequency in aesthetics has increased in popularity since the early 2000s. To date, there have been limited studies investigating the effect of thermal energy secondary to radiofrequency treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate perfusion and lymphatic assessment tools pre and post bipolar and fractional radiofrequency treatment.

Methods: A retrospective IRB-approved study was conducted between January 2019 and April 2019. Patients who were independently deemed appropriate candidates for radiofrequency soft tissue remodeling were evaluated. Diagnostic perfusion and lymphatic imaging obtained were reviewed using indocyanine green (SPY, Stryker) and optical coherence tomography (Vivosight OCT).

Results: A total of 63 patients were treated during the study period, of which 37 had diagnostic perfusion and lymphatic imaging. Average patient age was 47 (STD 12), 95% (35/37) of patients were women, and no patients were active smokers. In total, 27% (10/37) of patients were post-surgical patients with recurrent laxity, 32% (12/37) did not have enough skin laxity to justify traditional excisions procedures, and 41% (15/37) may have been candidates for excisional procedures but were willing to accept more moderate results to avoid excisions surgery. Indocyanine green perfusion and lymphatic assessment for bipolar and fractional radiofrequency, as well as optical coherence tomography pre and post radiofrequency, did not show compromise from thermal injury.

Conclusions: This study supports safety of radiofrequency in terms of preservation of tissue perfusion and lymphatic drainage. This correlated to our low clinical incidence of burns, prolonged swelling, or tissue ischemia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GOX.0000000000003193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7647541PMC
October 2020

The Plastic Surgery Residency Interview Revisited: Virtual Interviews and Beyond.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2020 11;146(5):1209-1211

From the Division of Plastic, Maxillofacial, and Oral Surgery, Duke University Hospital; the Division of Plastic Surgery, University of California, San Diego; the Division of Plastic Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine; the Department of Plastic Surgery, New York University Langone Medical Center; and the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007321DOI Listing
November 2020

Surgical Management of the Explant Patient: An Update on Options for Breast Contouring and Volume Restoration.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2020 11;146(5):978-985

From the Dallas Plastic Surgery Institute; and the Department of Plastic Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center.

Background: Breast implant removal is becoming a common procedure in light of the current events and controversies with silicone breast implants. The authors believe strongly in informing patients about the indications and options regarding both explantation and the management of the secondary breast deformity.

Methods: Relevant literature regarding the management of the explant patient was reviewed and organized to provide an update on prior publications addressing the explant patient population.

Results: Surgical management options after implant removal include breast contouring and volume restoration. Fat augmentation has been used in both aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery.

Conclusions: The authors review the surgical management for explantation, breast contouring, and autologous fat grafting for volume restoration. In the explant patient, autologous fat grafting serves as a reliable option for volume restoration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000007288DOI Listing
November 2020