Publications by authors named "Robyn J Cohen"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sensitivity of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (64-Card Version) versus the Tower of London (Drexel Version) for detecting executive dysfunction in children with epilepsy.

Child Neuropsychol 2018 04 3;24(3):354-369. Epub 2017 Jan 3.

g Space Coast Neuropsychology Center , Melbourne , FL , USA.

Executive function deficits are common in children and adolescents with epilepsy. Though the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) is often considered the "gold standard" for executive function assessment, its sensitivity-particularly in the case of the 64-card version (WCST-64)-is insufficiently established in pediatric samples, including children and adolescents with epilepsy. The present investigation assesses the sensitivity of the WCST-64 in children and adolescents with epilepsy in comparison to another measure: the Tower of London - Drexel Version (TOL-DX). A total of 88 consecutively referred children and adolescents with epilepsy were administered both the WCST-64 and TOL-DX as part of a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation. The sensitivity of WCST-64 and TOL-DX variables were established and relations with epilepsy severity measures and other executive function measures were assessed. Of the WCST-64 variables, Perseverative Responses is the most sensitive, but detected executive function impairment in only 19% of this clinically referred sample; in contrast, the TOL-DX Rule Violations detected executive function impairment in half of the sample. Further, TOL-DX performances are more strongly related to epilepsy severity variables and other executive function measures in comparison to the WCST-64. Despite its popularity amongst clinicians, the WCST-64 is not as sensitive to executive dysfunction in comparison to other measures of comparable administration time, such as the TOL-DX.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09297049.2016.1265101DOI Listing
April 2018

Anxiety sensitivity and obsessive--compulsive disorder.

Assessment 2008 Sep 29;15(3):351-63. Epub 2008 Feb 29.

Department of Psychology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA.

Anxiety sensitivity (AS), a cognitive risk factor for anxiety disorders, was evaluated in a homogeneous obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) sample. A total of 280 individuals with OCD completed measures. Evaluation of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index revealed a latent structure that was congruent with previous studies showing a single higher order and three lower order factors, although greater variance was accounted for by the general factor than in a previous study. AS was significantly associated with OCD symptom severity after controlling for other putative cognitive risk factors, although the additional variance explained was small. Variability in the relationship of AS to OCD symptom severity was found across OCD symptom subgroups. Results suggest that AS might be an important aspect of OCD-relevant cognition for specific OCD subgroups, and the need for experimental evaluation is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073191107312611DOI Listing
September 2008

Quality of life in obsessive-compulsive disorder: an evaluation of impairment and a preliminary analysis of the ameliorating effects of treatment.

Depress Anxiety 2008 ;25(3):248-59

Anxiety Disorders Center, The Institute of Living, Hartford, Connecticut, USA.

Despite the substantial impairments in life functioning associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), treatment outcome evaluations have focused almost exclusively on symptom reduction, a focus that may be too narrow to determine whether clinically significant change has occurred. Quality of life (QOL) impairment was evaluated in a clinical OCD sample (N=188) using a multidimensional life satisfaction measure. Relationships between treatment response and QOL change also were evaluated with a subsample of participants (n=120). Congruent with previous studies of OCD, substantial pretreatment QOL impairment was found across all life domains. Distinct treatment change subgroups were identified: a group reporting strong symptom reduction and very good QOL gains, a second group with significant symptom reduction but less robust QOL improvements, and a third group with limited symptom gains and QOL decreases. Implications for understanding OCD-related impairment and the clinical significance of treatment outcomes are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/da.20298DOI Listing
June 2008

Dysfunctional belief-based obsessive-compulsive disorder subgroups.

Behav Res Ther 2006 Sep 6;44(9):1347-60. Epub 2005 Dec 6.

Department of Psychology, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA.

An attempt was made to identify obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) subgroups based on differences in OCD related beliefs. OCD patients (N=367) were assessed with the Obsessional-Beliefs Questionnaire prior to treatment. Individuals' scores on measures of inflated personal responsibility and the tendency to overestimate threat, perfectionism and intolerance of uncertainty, and over-importance and over-control of thoughts were subjected to cluster analysis. Support for both a simple and complex subgroup model was found (2-subgroup and 5-subgroup taxonomies). A low-beliefs subgroup was identified in both taxonomies. The low-beliefs subgroups reported scores on belief measures equivalent to scores reported for non-OCD comparison groups in earlier studies. Additional analyses were conducted to determine relations between belief-based and symptom subgroups. Significant relationships were found (e.g., Symmetry symptom subgroup membership was associated with membership in the Perfectionism/Certainty beliefs subgroup), although the shared variance was modest. Implications for understanding OCD heterogeneity and for cognitive theory are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2005.10.005DOI Listing
September 2006

Obsessive-compulsive disorder subtypes: an attempted replication and extension of a symptom-based taxonomy.

Behav Res Ther 2004 Jun;42(6):647-70

Department of Psychology, Finch University of Health Sciences/The Chicago Medical School, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA.

A symptom-based subgroup taxonomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was evaluated and refined. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale symptom checklist was scored and cluster analysis was conducted with a sample of OCD patients (N = 114). Results were compared to Calamari et al.'s (Behaviour Research and Therapy 37 (1999) 113) five subgroup model. Rules for determining the number of subgroups supported a more complex model. In between sample comparisons, a stable contamination subgroup was found in both a five and seven subgroup taxonomy. Between sample stability was not as strong for Harming, Obsessionals, Symmetry, and Certainty subgroups. Hoarding, as a distinctive subgroup, was unstable in separate samples. When the Calamari et al. sample and the present sample were combined (N = 220), we found a reliable Hoarding subgroup. More interpretable and stable models emerged with the combined samples suggesting that large clinical samples are needed to identify OCD subgroups. Greater support was found for a seven subgroup taxonomy based subgroup interpretability and validation measure differences. The potential utility of symptom-based subgroup models of OCD and alternative approaches are discussed. Identification of reliable and valid OCD subtypes may advance theory and treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0005-7967(03)00173-6DOI Listing
June 2004