Publications by authors named "Robin Ulriksen"

3 Publications

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A Scoping Review of Constructs Measured Following Intervention for School Refusal: Are We Measuring Up?

Front Psychol 2020 20;11:1744. Epub 2020 Aug 20.

BI Norwegian Business School, Oslo, Norway.

Reviews of the effectiveness of interventions for school refusal (SR) rely upon well-conducted primary studies. Currently there are no guidelines for those conducting primary studies about the measurement of outcome following intervention for SR. Most people would agree that it is important to measure school attendance as an outcome but there has been little discussion about other constructs that warrant measurement. To facilitate this discussion and support the development of guidelines, we conducted a scoping review of constructs measured in studies evaluating intervention for SR. We screened the title and abstract of 3,213 publications found in peer-reviewed journals between 1980 and 2019. After full text review of 271 publications, 50 publications describing 51 studies were included. Results address the frequency with which constructs were measured, along with instruments used, informants, and time-points for measurement. Based on the results, we offer guidelines for choosing constructs to measure following intervention for SR and considerations for how to measure the constructs. Guidelines can increase consistency across primary studies, with benefits for future meta-analyses and international comparisons. They also provide support for practitioners contemplating routine evaluation of their interventions for SR. Ultimately, a core outcome set for SR can be developed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01744DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7468385PMC
August 2020

Achievement motives, self-efficacy, achievement goals, and academic achievement at multiple stages of education: a longitudinal analysis.

Psychol Rep 2013 Jun;112(3):771-87

The Norwegian Centre for Child Behavioral Development, Postbox 7053, Majorstuen, 0306 Oslo, Norway.

The present study investigated the joint effects of achievement motives, self-efficacy, and achievement goals as predictors of subsequent academic achievement among educational science students. A longitudinal research design allowed for measurement of motivational variables at several stages of education during bachelor courses (subsequent to the introductory courses), firstly by measuring achievement motives, secondly by self-efficacy and achievement goals. Subsequently, students' academic achievement level was measured at four different points in time, until they finished the last course for their bachelor degrees. A multivariate path analysis showed consistent relations between the motivational variables. The motive to avoid failure positively predicted the adoption of avoidance goals (both mastery and performance) and negatively predicted self-efficacy. Academic achievement was mainly predicted by the motive for success and performance-avoidance goals. The path analysis also showed strong relationships between the examination grades at different points in time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2466/14.09.PR0.112.3.771-787DOI Listing
June 2013

Achievement motives and emotional processes in children during problem-solving: Two experimental studies of their relation to performance in different achievement goal conditions.

Motiv Emot 2011 Dec 20;35(4):351-367. Epub 2011 May 20.

In two studies, the influence of key emotional and motivational factors on performance in different achievement goal-type situations is examined. In study 1, based on 314 sixth-graders, two types of goal situations were induced; performance and mastery. The goals were examined with respect to important antecedents (e.g., motive dispositions) and several consequences (e.g., performance, satisfaction, pleasant affect, worry, and emotionality). The results showed that the motive to achieve success (M(s)) produced positive affects, satisfaction, and increased performance, whereas the motive to avoid failure (M(f)) produced worries and performance reduction. In study 2, based on 331 sixth-graders, three types of goal situations were induced; performance-approach, performance-avoidance, and mastery goals. The findings revealed that the most important single factors positively related to performance were M(s) and mastery-goal situation. In addition, high M(s) pupils performed better under mastery condition than under performance condition. Finally, avoidance-goal situation accentuate the negative effects of high M(f) on performance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11031-011-9224-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3204325PMC
December 2011
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