Publications by authors named "Roberto T Bossi"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

NMS-P937, a 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline derivative as potent and selective Polo-like kinase 1 inhibitor.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2011 May 21;21(10):2969-74. Epub 2011 Mar 21.

Nerviano Medical Sciences srl, Business Unit Oncology, Viale Pasteur 10, 20014 Nerviano, MI, Italy.

As part of our drug discovery effort, we identified and developed 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline derivatives as PLK1 inhibitors. We now report the optimization of this class that led to the identification of NMS-P937, a potent, selective and orally available PLK1 inhibitor. Also, in order to understand the source of PLK1 selectivity, we determined the crystal structure of PLK1 with NMS-P937. The compound was active in vivo in HCT116 xenograft model after oral administration and is presently in Phase I clinical trials evaluation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2011.03.054DOI Listing
May 2011

Crystal structures of anaplastic lymphoma kinase in complex with ATP competitive inhibitors.

Biochemistry 2010 Aug;49(32):6813-25

Nerviano Medical Sciences S.r.l., Viale Pasteur 10, 20014 Nerviano (MI), Italy.

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the development of several human cancers and, as a result, is a recognized target for the development of small-molecule inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive malignancies. Here, we present the crystal structures of the unphosphorylated human ALK kinase domain in complex with the ATP competitive ligands PHA-E429 and NVP-TAE684. Analysis of these structures provides valuable information concerning the specific characteristics of the ALK active site as well as giving indications about how to obtain selective ALK inhibitors. In addition, the ALK-KD-PHA-E429 structure led to the identification of a potential regulatory mechanism involving a link made between a short helical segment immediately following the DFG motif and an N-terminal two-stranded beta-sheet. Finally, mapping of the activating mutations associated with neuroblastoma onto our structures may explain the roles these residues have in the activation process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bi1005514DOI Listing
August 2010

A covalent modification of NADP+ revealed by the atomic resolution structure of FprA, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis oxidoreductase.

Biochemistry 2002 Jul;41(28):8807-18

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia, Italy.

FprA is a mycobacterial oxidoreductase that catalyzes the transfer of reducing equivalents from NADPH to a protein acceptor. We determined the atomic resolution structure of FprA in the oxidized (1.05 A resolution) and NADPH-reduced (1.25 A resolution) forms. The comparison of these FprA structures with that of bovine adrenodoxin reductase showed no significant overall differences. Hence, these enzymes, which belong to the structural family of the disulfide oxidoreductases, are structurally conserved in very distant organisms such as mycobacteria and mammals. Despite the conservation of the overall fold, the details of the active site of FprA show some peculiar features. In the oxidized enzyme complex, the bound NADP+ exhibits a covalent modification, which has been identified as an oxygen atom linked through a carbonylic bond to the reactive C4 atom of the nicotinamide ring. Mass spectrometry has confirmed this assignment. This NADP+ derivative is likely to form by oxidation of the NADP+ adduct resulting from nucleophilic attack by an active-site water molecule. A Glu-His pair is well positioned to activate the attacking water through a mechanism analogous to that of the catalytic triad in serine proteases. The NADP+ nicotinamide ring exhibits the unusual cis conformation, which may favor derivative formation. The physiological significance of this reaction is presently unknown. However, it could assist with drug-design studies in that the modified NADP+ could serve as a lead compound for the development of specific inhibitors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bi025858aDOI Listing
July 2002

Structural studies on the synchronization of catalytic centers in glutamate synthase.

J Biol Chem 2002 Jul 19;277(27):24579-83. Epub 2002 Apr 19.

Department of Genetics and Microbiology, University of Pavia, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia, Italy.

The complex iron-sulfur flavoprotein glutamate synthase (GltS) plays a prominent role in ammonia assimilation in bacteria, yeasts, and plants. GltS catalyzes the formation of two molecules of l-glutamate from 2-oxoglutarate and l-glutamine via intramolecular channeling of ammonia. GltS has the impressive ability of synchronizing its distinct catalytic centers to avoid wasteful consumption of l-glutamine. We have determined the crystal structure of the ferredoxin-dependent GltS in several ligation and redox states. The structures reveal the crucial elements in the synchronization between the glutaminase site and the 2-iminoglutarate reduction site. The structural data combined with the catalytic properties of GltS indicate that binding of ferredoxin and 2-oxoglutarate to the FMN-binding domain of GltS induce a conformational change in the loop connecting the two catalytic centers. The rearrangement induces a shift in the catalytic elements of the amidotransferase domain, such that it becomes activated. This machinery, over a distance of more than 30 A, controls the ability of the enzyme to bind and hydrolyze the ammonia-donating substrate l-glutamine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M202541200DOI Listing
July 2002

Structure of FAD-bound L-aspartate oxidase: insight into substrate specificity and catalysis.

Biochemistry 2002 Mar;41(9):3018-24

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia, Italy.

L-Aspartate oxidase (Laspo) catalyzes the conversion of L-Asp to iminoaspartate, the first step in the de novo biosynthesis of NAD(+). This bacterial pathway represents a potential drug target since it is absent in mammals. The Laspo R386L mutant was crystallized in the FAD-bound catalytically competent form and its three-dimensional structure determined at 2.5 A resolution in both the native state and in complex with succinate. Comparison of the R386L holoprotein with the wild-type apoenzyme [Mattevi, A., Tedeschi, G., Bacchella, L., Coda, A., Negri, A., and Ronchi, S. (1999) Structure 7, 745-756] reveals that cofactor incorporation leads to the ordering of two polypeptide segments (residues 44-53 and 104-141) and to a 27 degree rotation of the capping domain. This motion results in the formation of the active site cavity, located at the interface between the capping domain and the FAD-binding domain. The structure of the succinate complex indicates that the cavity surface is decorated by two clusters of H-bond donors that anchor the ligand carboxylates. Moreover, Glu121, which is strictly conserved among Laspo sequences, is positioned to interact with the L-Asp alpha-amino group. The architecture of the active site of the Laspo holoenzyme is remarkably similar to that of respiratory fumarate reductases, providing strong evidence for a common mechanism of catalysis in Laspo and flavoproteins of the succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase family. This implies that Laspo is mechanistically distinct from other flavin-dependent amino acid oxidases, such as the prototypical D-amino acid oxidase.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bi015939rDOI Listing
March 2002