Publications by authors named "Roberto Cláudio Fernandes Franco Pompeu"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dietary nutrient restrictions in the post-weaning period change Santa Inês ewe lamb nutritional metabolic profile.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2021 Jun 14;53(3):359. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Animal Science Department, Federal University of Tocantins, BR-153, Km 112, s/no, Caixa Postal 132, 77.804-970, Araguaina, Tocantins, Brazil.

The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic profile of Santa Inês ewe lambs fed diets for early or late-maturing diets with or without nutrient restrictions. The experiment consisted of a 2 × 2 completely randomized factorial experiment with either early- or late-maturity feed formulation according to "Nutrient Requirements of Small Ruminants" with or without 15% crude protein (CP) and total digestible nutrients (TDN) restrictions in diets formulated, five replications, and 20 ewe lambs averaging 15.1±2.6 kg. Lambs on early-maturity diets consumed greater (P<0.05) dietary ether extract (EE), non-fibrous carbohydrates, and TDN than those on late-maturity diets. Lambs on early-maturity diets had 7.11% greater dry matter digestibility (DMD) compared to lambs fed late-maturity diets. Lambs fed late-maturity diets, in general, had greater intake (IN), excreted (EN), and retained (RN) N as well as greater RN/IN and EN/IN ratios. There were no differences in blood total protein or albumin among lambs fed for different finishing maturity targets. Diets designed for late-maturing lambs resulted in greater microbial N and CP as well as rumen and metabolizable, degradable, and undegradable rumen and metabolizable CP. The selection of diets for early or late maturity carcasses depends on the production system goals. Diets without restrictions are recommended for early-maturity carcass finishing while diets with 15% CP and TDN restriction are recommend for late-maturity finishing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-021-02767-3DOI Listing
June 2021

Castor cake as organic fertilizer to control gastrointestinal nematodes in pasture-raised sheep.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2020 4;29(4):e021420. Epub 2020 Dec 4.

Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária - Embrapa Caprinos e Ovinos, Sobral, CE, Brasil.

Gastrointestinal parasitism is one of the factors that discourages farmers from raising small ruminants in cultivated pastures. To validate a soil treatment strategy to control the free-living stages of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), castor cake (CC) was used as a fertilizer on a pasture where sheep grazed on guinea grass under continuous stocking. On day zero, the pasture was divided into three paddocks, contaminated by GIN and treated, respectively, with CC divided into two applications (2CC1/2), CC in a single application (CC1) and organic compost in a single application (control). On day 21, eight GIN-free sheep were placed in each paddock. On day 58, significant differences (P<0.05) were observed: reduction of up to 66.10% in larvae.g-1 of dry mass in pastures fertilized with CC, decrease of up to 60.72% in infection rates among the animals in the groups treated with CC, higher average daily weight gain (over 185 g.day-1) and packed cell volume (over 26%) in the groups treated with CC, when compared to the control (128 g.day-1; 20.9%). In view of the results, the use of CC, mainly CC1, as a fertilizer for guinea grass pastures, under continuous stocking, proved to be promising, with 63.41% effectiveness in controlling worm infestations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612020103DOI Listing
January 2021

Influence of nutrient restriction on finishing Morada Nova lambs.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2020 Nov 17;52(6):3509-3518. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

Texas A&M Agrilife Research, Stephenville, TX, 76401-9698, USA.

Our objective was to evaluate the effect of 15% crude protein (CP) and total digestible nutrient (TDN) restriction vis-á-vis that recommended by NRC (2007) on feed intake, digestibility, and average daily gain (ADG) of confined Morada Nova lambs. Twenty lambs with 18.8 ± 2.8 kg liveweight were assigned to a randomized 2 × 2 factorial experiment with either early- or late-maturity feed formulation according to "Nutrient Requirements of Small Ruminants" with or without 15% CP and TDN restriction. The early-maturity diet, independent of restriction, resulted in greater dry matter and organic matter intake and increased rumination efficiency and feed conversion. Early-maturity diets also had the greatest nutrient digestibility as well as ADG and total gains. With late-maturity diets, independent of restriction, there were greater CP and TDN digestibilities as well as neutral detergent fiber (NDF) feed efficiency. However, when 15% of nutrients were restricted for late-maturity lamb diets, there was greater NDF intake and greater ether extract digestibility. Unrestricted early-maturity lamb diets was the better diet for confined Morada Nova lambs. Attention should be given to minimum effective NDF consumed and physically effective for this diet formulation. The use of late-maturity diets as recommended by NRC (2007) allows for 15% restriction of CP and TDN in Morada Nova lambs without negative effects on performance. This restriction should be tested in other tropical breeds to determine wider application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-020-02385-5DOI Listing
November 2020

Crop residues activity against the free-living stages of small ruminant nematodes.

Rev Bras Parasitol Vet 2019 Aug 29;28(3):528-532. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

Embrapa Caprinos e Ovinos, Sobral, CE, Brasil.

The nematicidal effect of different organic materials was evaluated in order to develop a non-chemical alternative soil treatment for control of the free-living stages of small ruminant gastrointestinal nematodes. The selected organic materials were residues from the juice industry of acerola, cashew, grape, guava, papaya and pineapple, as well as castor residue from the biodiesel industry. LC90 results showed that pineapple residue was the most efficient inhibitor of larval development, followed by castor, grape, cashew, acerola, guava and papaya. Castor residue was also a good source of nitrogen and was used in a greenhouse experiment to prevent larval development in contaminated goat faeces that was deposited in pots containing the grasses Brachiaria brizantha (var. Paiaguás) or Megathyrsus maximus x M. infestum (var. Massai). Castor residue caused a significant (P < 0.05) reduction (85.04%) in Paiaguás grass contamination (L3.dry mass-1) and a reduction of 17.35% in Massai grass contamination (P > 0.05), with an increase in the biomass production of Massai (251.43%, P < 0.05) and Paiaguás (109.19%, P > 0.05) grasses. This strategy, called Econemat®, with good results in vitro shows to be promising on pasture increasing phytomass production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1984-29612019024DOI Listing
August 2019

Inactivation of lectins from castor cake by alternative chemical compounds.

Toxicon 2019 Mar 18;160:47-54. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Embrapa Caprinos e Ovinos/Núcleo Regional Nordeste, Rua Oswaldo Cruz, n° 1.143, Bairro Centenário, 58.428-095, Campina Grande, PB, Brazil. Electronic address:

Enabling the use of castor cake in animal feeding is an excellent alternative strategy to reduce feed costs. The cake is a by-product derived from the extraction of the castor oil by the biodiesel industry whose chemical composition is satisfactory despite the presence of antinutritional factors like toxic lectins, which require detoxification before it can be used as a dietary ingredient. The aim of the present study was to evaluate alternative chemical sources in the degradation and inactivation of ricin and Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), two lectins from castor cake. Ten chemical compounds were evaluated: sodium hydroxide, monodicalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate, calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, calcitic limestone, magnesian limestone, urea, potassium chloride, and sodium chloride. Gel electrophoresis indicated 100% lectin degradation only in the cakes treated with 90 g sodium hydroxide and 2500 mL water per kg of cake. The hemagglutination assay was crucial to providing innocuousness to the treated cakes, with total absence of hemagglutinating activity observed in the castor cakes treated with 60 or 90 g sodium hydroxide in water volumes equal to or higher than 1500 mL/kg of castor cake and in the cakes treated with 90 g calcium oxide with 2500 or 3000 mL water/kg castor cake. Thus, though depending on the concentration of the chemical compound and on the volume of water per kilogram of treated cake, sodium hydroxide and calcium oxide showed to be promising chemical products for degradation and complete inactivation of the lectins present in castor cake to allow its use as an ingredient in animal diets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2019.02.003DOI Listing
March 2019
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