Publications by authors named "Roberto A Corpus"

5 Publications

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Multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with multivessel disease and acute myocardial infarction.

Am Heart J 2004 Sep;148(3):493-500

Section of Cardiology, Biostatistics, and Outcomes Research, Mid America Heart Institute, St. Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, Mo 64111, USA.

Background: The optimal percutaneous interventional strategy for dealing with significant non-culprit lesions in patients with multivessel disease (MVD) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at presentation remains controversial.

Methods: A total of 820 patients treated with primary angioplasty for AMI between 1998 and 2002 were classified in groups of patients with single vessel disease (SVD) or MVD (> or =70% stenosis of > or =2 coronary arteries). Patients with MVD were subdivided in 3 groups on the basis of the revascularization strategy: 1) patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the infarct-related artery (IRA) only; 2) patients undergoing PCI of both the IRA and non-IRA(s) during the initial procedure; and 3) patients undergoing PCI of the IRA followed by staged, in-hospital PCI of the non-IRA(s). Procedural, 30-day, and 1-year outcomes are reported.

Results: At 1 year, compared with patients with SVD, patients with MVD had a higher incidence of re-infarction (5.9% vs 1.6%, P =.003), revascularization (18% vs 9.6%, P <.001), mortality (12% vs 3.2%, P <.001), and major adverse cardiac events (MACEs; 31% vs 13%, P <.001). In patients with MVD, compared with PCI restricted to the IRA only, multivessel PCI was associated with higher rates of re-infarction (13.0% vs 2.8%, P <.001), revascularization (25% vs 15%, P =.007), and MACEs (40% vs 28%, P =.006). Multivessel PCI was an independent predictor of MACEs at 1 year (odds ratio = 1.67, P =.01).

Conclusions: These data suggest that in patients with MVD, PCI should be directed at the IRA only, with decisions about PCI of non-culprit lesions guided by objective evidence of residual ischemia at late follow-up. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2004.03.051DOI Listing
September 2004

Optimal glycemic control is associated with a lower rate of target vessel revascularization in treated type II diabetic patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2004 Jan;43(1):8-14

Division of Cardiology and Biostatistics, Mid America Heart Institute, St. Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri, USA.

Objectives: We examined the association between glycemic control determined by preprocedural hemoglobin A1c (A1c) and the incidence of target vessel revascularization (TVR) in diabetic patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Background: Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have increased rates of restenosis and a worse clinical outcome after PCI than patients without DM.

Methods: A total of 239 patients (60 without DM and 179 with DM) were enrolled in this study. Optimal glycemic control was defined as A1c < or =7%, and suboptimal control was defined as A1c >7%. Follow-up was performed at six and 12 months after the index intervention.

Results: Diabetic patients with optimal glycemic control had a rate of 12-month TVR similar to that of nondiabetic patients (15% vs. 18%, p = NS). Diabetic patients with A1c >7% had a significantly higher rate of TVR than those with A1c <7% (34% vs. 15%, p = 0.02). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, A1c >7% was a significant independent predictor of TVR (odds ratio 2.87, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 7.24; p = 0.03). Optimal glycemic control was associated with a lower rate of cardiac rehospitalization (15% vs. 31%, p = 0.03) and recurrent angina (13% vs. 37%, p = 0.002) at 12-month follow-up.

Conclusions: In diabetic patients undergoing elective PCI, optimal glycemic control (A1c < or =7%) is associated with a lower rate of TVR, cardiac rehospitalization, and recurrent angina. These data suggest that aggressive treatment of DM to achieve A1c < or =7% is beneficial in improving the clinical outcome after PCI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2003.06.019DOI Listing
January 2004

Relation of hemoglobin A1c to rate of major adverse cardiac events in nondiabetic patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization.

Am J Cardiol 2003 Dec;92(11):1282-6

Division of Cardiology, Mid America Heart Institute, St. Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri 64111, USA.

Abnormalities in plasma glucose below the "diabetic range" of glycemia are associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients without diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between ambient glycemic levels as measured by hemoglobin A1c and outcome after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Baseline laboratory studies, including hemoglobin A1c, were drawn in 500 consecutive patients before elective PCI. Nondiabetic patients were defined as those without a history of diet or pharmacologically controlled diabetes mellitus and a hemoglobin A1c level <7.0%. Of the 500 patients studied, 291 (59%) were nondiabetic patients. Abnormal hemoglobin A1c levels (6% to 7%) were found in 30% of nondiabetic patients. Nondiabetic patients with an abnormal hemoglobin A1c level had a significantly higher rate of major adverse cardiac events (33% vs 22%, p = 0.04), target vessel revascularization (31% vs 19%, p = 0.02), and cardiovascular mortality (4.6% vs 0.5%, p = 0.03) compared with nondiabetic patients with hemoglobin A1c levels <6%. Multivariate analysis disclosed that a hemoglobin A1c level of 6% to 7% was a significant independent predictor of major adverse cardiac events, target vessel revascularization, and cardiovascular mortality 12 months after PCI in nondiabetic patients. These data demonstrate that an abnormal hemoglobin A1c level may have prognostic significance in nondiabetic patients who undergo PCI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2003.08.008DOI Listing
December 2003

Exercise-induced nonsustained ventricular tachycardia: a significant marker of coronary artery disease?

J Interv Cardiol 2002 Jun;15(3):231-5

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 W. Thirteen Mile Rd., Royal Oak, MI 48073, USA.

Diagnostic exercise stress testing is commonly performed in patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. The significance of an ischemic response, manifested as significant ST-segment depression, angina pectoris, transient myocardial perfusion abnormalities, or combinations thereof, is well established. However, the diagnostic implications of exercise-induced nonsustained VT are uncertain, especially as an isolated finding. The patient had threatening ventricular arrhythmias at peak exercise without an ischemic response. Subsequent cardiac catheterization revealed significant CAD requiring percutaneous coronary intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-8183.2002.tb01063.xDOI Listing
June 2002
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