Publications by authors named "Roberta Aimar"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Treatment of Ureteral Stent-Related Symptoms.

Urol Int 2021 Nov 2:1-16. Epub 2021 Nov 2.

Division of Urology, Department of Oncology, School of Medicine, San Luigi Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.

Background: The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of the main classes of drugs used at reducing morbidity related to ureteric stents.

Summary: After establishing a priori protocol, a systematic electronic literature search was conducted in July 2019. The randomized clinical trials (RCTs) selection proceeded in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and was registered (PROSPERO ID 178130). The risk of bias and the quality assessment of the included RCTs were performed. Ureteral Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and quality of life (QoL) were pooled for meta-analysis. Mean difference and risk difference were calculated as appropriate for each outcome to determine the cumulative effect size. Fourteen RCTs were included in the analysis accounting for 2,842 patients. Alpha antagonist, antimuscarinic, and phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors significatively reduced all indexes of the USSQ, the IPSS and QoL scores relative to placebo. Conversely, combination therapy (alpha antagonist plus antimuscarinic) showed in all indexes of the USSQ, IPSS, and QoL over alpha antagonist or antimuscarinic alone. On comparison with alpha blockers, PDE inhibitors were found to be equally effective for urinary symptoms, general health, and body pain parameters, but sexual health parameters improved significantly with PDE inhibitors. Finally, antimuscarinic resulted in higher decrease in all indexes of the USSQ, the IPSS, and QoL relative to alpha antagonist. Key message: Relative to placebo, alpha antagonist alone, antimuscarinics alone, and PDE inhibitors alone have beneficial effect in reducing stent-related symptoms. Furthermore, there are significant advantages of combination therapy compared with monotherapy. Finally, PDE inhibitors are comparable to alpha antagonist, and antimuscarinic seems to be more effective than alpha antagonist alone.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000518387DOI Listing
November 2021

The importance of anatomical reconstruction for continence recovery after robot assisted radical prostatectomy: a systematic review and pooled analysis from referral centers.

Minerva Urol Nephrol 2021 04 17;73(2):165-177. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Division of Urology, Department of Oncology, School of Medicine, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Turin, Italy.

Introduction: Urinary incontinence is one of the most scared sequelae of robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). Therefore, different surgical modifications, aimed to restore the original anatomy, were proposed to overcome this issue. The purpose of this study is to assess which is the best reconstruction technique (posterior only: PR; anterior only: AR; total: TR) compared to the standard approach for continence recovery after RARP in a tertiary care center.

Evidence Acquisition: After establishing an a priori protocol, a systematic electronic literature search was conducted in May 2019. The article selection proceeded in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and was registered (PROSPERO registry number 131667). The risk of bias and the quality assessment of the included studies were performed. Simple pooled analysis was performed for continence rates according to the definition of continence (0 pad vs. 0-1 pad) and the different types of reconstruction at 1, 4, 12, 24, 52 weeks after RARP. Complication rate, operative and console time and estimated blood loss were pooled. Two-side test of proportion and T-test were used to compare rates and mean, respectively.

Evidence Synthesis: Six studies meeting the inclusion criteria were found and included in the analysis. All the included studies were of "poor" or "good" quality. A high or moderate risk of bias was recorded. TR showed higher continence recovery rates, compared to their anterior reconstruction counterpart at 1, 4, 12, 24, 52 weeks (P<0.001 at all time-points). At 12 weeks TR showed the highest continence rates (P<0.001), followed by AR and PR. No statistically significant differences were recorded regarding anastomosis-related complication rates (anastomosis stricture P=0.08; urine leakage P=0.1).

Conclusions: In patients undergoing RARP, TR facilitates a faster and higher continence recovery compared to standard approach or PR or AR only.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S2724-6051.20.04146-6DOI Listing
April 2021

All you need to know about "Aquablation" procedure for treatment of benign prostatic obstruction.

Minerva Urol Nefrol 2020 Apr 19;72(2):152-161. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Department of Urology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Turin, Italy.

Introduction: In recent years, technological advances and new approaches have been developed for the treatment of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) in order to reduce complications like bleeding, retrograde ejaculation and risk of infection while obtaining an adequate disobstruction. The most recent surgical approach introduced is the Aquablation system (PROCEPT BioRobotics, Redwood Shores, CA, USA). This intervention is a robotically guided system that uses high-velocity water jets in order to ablate prostatic tissue, with real-time ultrasound guidance. The aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence on Aquablation and its results, compared to the reported outcomes of the gold standard treatment, the transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP).

Evidence Acquisition: A systematic review of the Literature was performed in June 2019 using Medline (via PubMed), Embase (via Ovid), and Cochrane databases. The studies that compared the Aquablation to the standard TURP were included. Moreover, a critical review of the single arm studies was conducted.

Evidence Synthesis: The results of this systematic review, based on a single RCT that compared Aquablation vs. TURP in prostates 30-80 cc in size, confirmed that Aquablation has at least a similar efficacy as TURP, but has a better safety profile, allows shorter resection times, and has a lower risk of retrograde ejaculation. Moreover, in some subcategories of patients (e.g., when prostate volume is >50 cc) functional outcomes of Aquablation are better than those of TURP. Evidence from non-comparative clinical studies and from real life scenarios have confirmed that Aquablation may be used effectively for prostate volumes up to 150 cc.

Conclusions: The Aquablation procedure for the treatment of BPO allows high clinical efficacy with an excellent safety profile. For prostate volume 30-80 cc, comparative studies demonstrated that this procedure offers clinical results at least comparable to those of conventional TURP. Latest evidence showed that Aquablation may be used effectively for prostate volumes up to 150 cc. The major strengths are its high-speed resection time, low complication rate, and potential for sexual function preservation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0393-2249.20.03654-1DOI Listing
April 2020

Risk of Gleason Score 3+4=7 prostate cancer upgrading at radical prostatectomy is significantly reduced by targeted versus standard biopsy.

Minerva Urol Nefrol 2020 Jun 10;72(3):360-368. Epub 2019 Oct 10.

Department of Urology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Turin, Italy -

Background: The aim of this study is to evaluate if multiparametric magnetic resonance (mpMRI)-transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion targeted biopsy (TBx) versus untargeted standard biopsy (SBx) may decrease the rate of pathological upgrading of Gleason Score (GS) 3+4 prostate cancer (PCa) at radical prostatectomy (RP). We also evaluated the impact of percent pattern 4 and cribriform glands at biopsy in the risk of GS 3+4=7 upgrading.

Methods: A total of 301 patients with GS 3+4 PCa on biopsy (159 SBx and 142 TBx) who underwent laparoscopic robot-assisted RP were sequentially enrolled. Histological data from RP sections were used as reference standard. The concordance of biopsy with pathological GS, as well as the GS 3+4 upgrading at RP were evaluated in different univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression models, testing age, PSA, fPSA%, tumor volume, PI-RADS, clinical stage, percentage of Gleason pattern 4 (GP) and/or presence of cribriform sub-type at biopsy.

Results: Of the 301 biopsies, the median of GP 4 was 16% of the tissue. Minimal GP 4 (≤16%) cancers had a significant lower median volume (1.7 mL) than those with GP4 >16% (2.9 mL), (P<0.001). Pathological GS 3+4 was confirmed for 58.8% and 82.2% for SBx and TBx patients, respectively. The rate of upgraded and downgraded GS on SBx versus TBx was 38.8% vis. 16.7% and 1.8% and 2.1%, respectively. The rate of upgrading was significantly associated with the presence of GP4 >16% versus ≤16% (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.4-12.0; P=0.021) and with the presence of cribriform sub-type at biopsy specimens (OR 6.2, 95% CI 2.2-18.7; P<0.001).

Conclusions: We demonstrated that TBx technique significantly reduced the risk of GS 3+4 upgrading at RP, compared to SBx one. The rate of upgrading was significantly associated with GP4>16%, mostly when cribriform sub-type was present at biopsy specimens.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0393-2249.19.03367-8DOI Listing
June 2020

3D mixed reality holograms for preoperative surgical planning of nephron-sparing surgery: evaluation of surgeons' perception.

Minerva Urol Nephrol 2021 06 5;73(3):367-375. Epub 2019 Sep 5.

Division of Urology, Department of Oncology, School of Medicine, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Turin, Italy.

Background: 3D reconstructions are gaining a wide diffusion in nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) planning. They have usually been studied on common 2D flat supports, with limitations regarding real depth comprehension and interaction. Nowadays, it is possible to visualize kidney 3D reconstructions as holograms in a "mixed reality" (MR) setting. The aim of this study was to test the face and content validity of this technology, and to assess the role of 3D holograms in aiding preoperative planning for highly complex renal tumors amenable by NSS.

Methods: We evaluated surgeons' perception of mixed reality for partial nephrectomy during a urological international meeting organized at our Institution in January 2019. Thanks to the images of preoperative CT, hyper-accuracy 3D (HA3D) reconstructions were performed. Then, a virtual environment was created, and it interacted with the models in mixed reality setting by using HoloLens. We submitted to all the attendees a questionnaire, expressed by the Likert scale (1-10), about their opinion over the use and application of the MR. Moreover, the attendees had the chance to perform a first-hand MR experience; then, they were asked to choose their clamping and resection approach.

Results: Overall 172 questionnaires were collected. The scores obtained regarding both surgical planning (scored 8/10) and anatomical accuracy (9/10) were very positive. High satisfaction toward the potential role of this technology in surgical planning and understanding of surgical complexity (both scored 9/10) were expressed. After a first-hand experience with HoloLens and MR, 64.4% and 44.4% of the surgeons changed their clamping and resection approach, respectively - compared to CT image visualization only - choosing a more selective one.

Conclusions: Our study suggests that surgeons perceive holograms and MR as a useful and interesting tool for the preoperative setting before partial nephrectomy, in the direction of an ever more precise surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S2724-6051.19.03610-5DOI Listing
June 2021

Total anatomical reconstruction during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: focus on urinary continence recovery and related complications after 1000 procedures.

BJU Int 2019 09 15;124(3):477-486. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Division of Urology, Department of Oncology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Turin, Italy.

Objectives: To present the functional and oncological outcomes after ≥1 year of follow-up, following an experience of >1000 robot-assisted radical prostatectomies (RARPs) with our standardised total anatomical reconstruction (TAR) technique. To evaluate which factors influence postoperative continence recovery in order to obtain a nomogram to predict the risk of postoperative urinary incontinence (UI).

Patients And Methods: The enrolment phase began in June 2013 and ended in May 2017. Patients were prospectively included in the study with the following inclusion criteria: (i) localised prostate cancer (clinical stages cT1-3, cN0, cM0); (ii) indication for RP; and (iii) preoperative multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent RARP with the TAR technique done at the end of the demolitive phase. The continence rates were assessed at 24 h, and 1, 4, 12, 24 and 48 weeks after catheter removal. Patients were defined as continent if they answered 'zero pad' or 'one safety pad' per day. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate the potential impact of some pre- and intraoperative factors on postoperative urinary continence recovery. Model discrimination was assessed using an area under (AUC) the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A nomogram to predict the risk of postoperative UI after RARP with the TAR technique was generated based on the logistic model.

Results: In all, 1008 patients were enrolled in our study. At 24 h, and 1, 4, 12, 24 and 48 weeks after catheter removal, 621 (61.61%), 594 (58.93%), 803 (79.66%), 912 (90.48%), 950 (94.25%) and 956 (94.84%) patients were continent, respectively. In the logistic regression model, the variables analysed had a higher impact on continence recovery at 4 and 12 weeks. At 4 weeks, the postoperative odds of urinary continence recovery increased with the absence of diabetes [odds ratio (OR) 2.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41-5.41] and D'Amico low vs high risk (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.01-3.99). At 12 weeks, urinary continence increased with the absence of diabetes (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.23-7.35), D'Amico low vs high risk (OR 4.04, 95% CI 1.56-10.47), and D'Amico intermediate vs high risk (OR 3.33, 95% CI 1.66-6.70). ROC curves were drawn and an AUC value of 61.9% (95% CI 57.49-66.36) at 4 weeks and 63.8% (95% CI 58.03-69.65) at 12 weeks were computed. Based on these parameters, two nomograms (at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively) were generated.

Conclusion: The TAR technique conferred excellent results in the early recovery of urinary continence. Two nomograms were created, to predict preoperatively the postoperative odds of urinary continence recovery at 4 and 12 weeks after RARP by integrating the presence of diabetes and D'Amico risk classification.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bju.14716DOI Listing
September 2019

Developing a five-step training model for transperineal prostate biopsies in a naïve residents' group: a prospective observational randomised study of two different techniques.

World J Urol 2019 Sep 10;37(9):1845-1850. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Department of Urology, Policlinico San Martino Hospital, University of Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, 16130, Genova, Italy.

Purpose: To evaluate a five-step training model for transperineal prostate biopsies (TPPB) and the differences in terms of the detection rate (DR) and the ease of execution when using either the "fan technique" (FT) or the use of a Free Hand technique (FH).

Methods: A prospective observational randomised study was conducted from September 2015 to November 2017. Six naïve residents, who underwent the same five-steps training model, were randomly subdivided into two different groups of three residents based on the selected TPPB technique: A (FT) and B (FH). Patient characteristics (age, PSA, prostatic volume, DRE, MRI), intraoperative (operative time, number of samples) and postoperative parameters (histologic, pain) were evaluated in the 2 groups. The overall and stratified DR for PSA ranges and prostate volume (PV), operative time and complications were compared.

Results: The overall detection rate was very high in both groups (FT 58.2% vs FH 59.6%) and not statistically different between the two techniques. There were no differences in terms of complication rates and pain. The FH showed a better detection rate in prostates smaller than 40 cc (p = 0.023) and a faster operative time (p = 0.025) compared to FT.

Conclusions: Within the TPPB, FH is associated with a higher detection rate in patients with prostate < 40 cc compared to an FT when performed by inexperienced trainees. Standardised training organised in consecutive steps seems to contribute to the achievement of overall high detection rates with both methods.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00345-018-2599-6DOI Listing
September 2019

The role of side-specific biopsy and dominant tumor location at radical prostatectomy in predicting the side of nodal metastases in organ confined prostate cancer: is lymphatic spread really unpredictable?

Minerva Urol Nefrol 2019 Apr 7;71(2):146-153. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Department of Urology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Turin, Italy -

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the location of prostate cancer (PCa) either at biopsy or at radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens and the side of positive lymph nodes (LNs). Furthermore, we assessed the risk of contralateral LN metastasis (LNMs) in patients with unilateral positive biopsy and/or dominant lesion at RP.

Methods: We reviewed retrospectively our prospectively maintained database of patients with LNM treated with robot-assisted RP and bilateral robot-assisted extended pelvic lymph node dissection (EPLND) for PCa from January 2014 to May 2018 at a surgical high-volume center. All men with a suspicion for PCa underwent a 12-cores prostate biopsy. In case of a first negative biopsy but the persistence of suspicion, all the patients underwent prostate multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and subsequently either fusion targeted biopsy (TBx) or systematic standard biopsy (SBx), in case of positive or negative mpMRI, respectively. All patients underwent a robot-assisted RP. Whole-mount histological sections resected from the RP specimens were used as reference standards.

Results: Eighty-seven patients were enrolled for the study. Median number of LNs retrieved per patient was 26, specifically 13 and 12, on the left and right side, respectively. Seven of 24 (29.1%) right lobe positive biopsy showed positive LNs on the left side (one exclusively left, 6 bilateral LNMs). Again, 12 of 26 (46.1%) left lobe positive biopsy showed positive LNs on the right side (one exclusively right, 11 bilateral LNMs). No significant differences of performance to predict the side of LNMs were recorded in the SBx and TBx groups. Concerning RP specimens, only five of 22 (22.7%) right lobe dominant cases showed positive LNs on the left side (two exclusively left, 3 bilateral LN metastases). Again, none of 16 left lobe dominant cases showed positive LNs on the contralateral side (15 exclusively right, 1 bilateral LNMs).

Conclusions: Our results suggest confirmed that a unilateral LN dissection limited to the tumor-bearing side of the gland evaluated by biopsy specimens should not be recommended due to the substantial risk of missing contralateral LNMs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0393-2249.18.03286-1DOI Listing
April 2019

Multiparametric-Magnetic Resonance/Ultrasound Fusion Targeted Prostate Biopsy Improves Agreement Between Biopsy and Radical Prostatectomy Gleason Score.

Anticancer Res 2016 09;36(9):4833-9

Division of Radiology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital Orbassano and University of Torino-I, Turin, Italy.

Aim: To investigate if targeted prostate biopsy (TBx) has superior performance to standard untargeted biopsy (SBx) in determining the optimal agreement between biopsy and surgical Gleason Score (GS).

Patients And Methods: An analysis of our institutional longitudinal database identified 683 consecutive patients who underwent either SBx (18-20 standardized transrectal ultrasound peripheral/transitional zone cores) or TBx alone (4-6 cores for each multiparametric magnetic resonance suspicious lesion, Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System [(PI-RADS)≥3] after a previous negative first SBx. A total of 246 consecutive patients with diagnosis of prostate cancer (117 SBx and 129 TBx diagnoses) who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy between January 2014 and December 2015, were enrolled. The concordance of biopsy GS to pathological GS, as well as the association between categorical variables [age, digital rectal exam (DRE), TNM, PI-RADS], were analyzed by Fisher's exact test.

Results: Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 32.0% of the SBx group and in 49.3% of TBx. The rate of correctly classified, up-graded and down-graded GS was 53.8% vs. 91.5%, 39.3% vs. 7.8% and 6.8% vs. 0.8% for SBx and TBx, respectively (p<0.001). The GS concordance rates for SBx and TBx cohorts were: 14.3% vs. 41.7% for GS 6, 61.0% vs. 83.8% for GS 3+4, 56.3% vs. 75.0% for GS 4+3, 27.3% vs. 100% for GS 8 and 80% vs. 100% for GS 9, respectively.

Conclusion: TBx ensured a higher of accuracy of prostate cancer detection and a better performance in discriminating significant from insignificant prostate cancer, when compared to SBx. TBx significantly reduced the risk of GS up-/down-grading at radical prostatectomy for all histopathological categories. This is a notable advance in the selection of candidates for active surveillance.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.21873/anticanres.11045DOI Listing
September 2016

[Suture materials in urology].

Urologia 2013 Jul-Sep;80(3):179-87. Epub 2013 Sep 30.

AOU San Luigi Hospital, University of Turin, Orbassano, Torino - Italy.

Since ancient times, sutures have been a fundamental part of the surgeon's practice. Beside the vegetable and animal origin materials, in the last decades different refined synthetic materials have been introduced in the clinical practice. More recently, different devices, such as staplers and tissue sealers have been developed. Thus, more than ever, urologists are faced with a multitude of suture materials, and research of safe, effective materials and devices seems to be continuously growing. The introduction and widespread diffusion of laparoscopic and robotic surgery has further boosted this research. Given there is no single material that is ideal for all situations, the surgeon must choose the best material for each particular case.
The aim of this non-systematic review is to summarize the more innovative suture materials and devices and to describe the different surgical methods to utilize them both in general and in urologic surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/RU.2013.11503DOI Listing
April 2015
-->