Publications by authors named "Robert Stryjecki"

4 Publications

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Freezing: how do water mites (Acari: Hydrachnidia) survive exposure to sub-zero temperatures?

Exp Appl Acarol 2021 Jul 21;84(3):565-583. Epub 2021 Jun 21.

Institute of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Center of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland.

Until now, very little is known about the ability of adult and deutonymph water mites (Acari, Hydrachnidia) to survive in sub-zero temperatures. Information concerns mainly water mites from vernal astatic waters, and the knowledge has never been experimentally verified. To determine the sensitivity of water mites to freezing, experiments were conducted on (1) the impact of acclimatization, (2) temperature, and (3) duration of freezing on survival, (4) the survival rate of water mites from various types of water bodies, and (5) the survival rate of water mites from different climatic zones. The experiments were carried out in a phytotron chamber, and water mites were placed in containers (10 × 10 × 5 cm) filled with 4/5 of water for 10 specimens each. Water mites were identified to the species level after finishing the experiments. The temperature was lowered 1 °C every hour until the target temperature was reached. After a certain period of freezing (depending on the treatment) the temperature was raised by 1 °C every hour until it reached 4 °C. The time of the experiment was measured from the moment the desired temperature was reached (below 0 °C) until the ice thawed and the temperature of 4 °C was reached again. The highest survival rates had Limnochares aquatica, Piona nodata, Sperchon clupeifer and Lebertia porosa, followed by L. insignis, Hygrobates longipalpis, H. setosus, Limnesia undulatoides, Piona pusilla, Arrenurus globator, Hydrodroma despiciens, Piona longipalpis, Sperchonopsis verrucosa, Unionicola crassipes and Mideopsis crassipes; no specimens of Torrenticola amplexa survived. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) water mites can survive freezing to -2 °C, lower temperatures are lethal for them; (2) they survived better the short period of freezing (24-48 h) than the long period (168 h); (3) resistance to freezing seems to be an evolutionary trait of individual species, only partly related to the living environment; and (4) freezing survival rates are linked to the region of Europe and are much lower in Southern than in Central Europe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10493-021-00634-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8257513PMC
July 2021

First detailed records of water mite larvae (Hydrachnidia: Hydrovolzidae, Hydryphantidae) parasitizing empidid flies (Diptera: Empididae: Clinocerinae).

Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl 2020 Aug 11;12:165-171. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

University of Szczecin, Institute of Marine and Environmental Science, Wąska 13, 71-415, Szczecin, Poland.

Five species of the subfamily Clinocerinae from the Tatra Mountains (S Poland) were observed to be parasitized by larval water mites. Two of them: Mik, 1880 and Mik, 1880 are recorded from this massif for the first time. In addition, is new for Polish fauna. The most infected species was Zetterstedt, 1838, following by (Bezzi, 1899), Mik, 1880, Mik, 1880 and Niesiołowski, 1987. The highest number of hosts occurred in the case of (Walter, 1907) with five host species, following by both (Monti, 1905) and (Protz, 1896) with one species each. In the case of more parasites were recorded on males than on females and in more parasites were recorded on females. The abdomen of the hosts was the most often chosen by water mites larvae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijppaw.2020.06.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7301174PMC
August 2020

Peroxidation and unsaturation coefficients as biomarkers of environmental micro-exposure to molluscicides in Helix pomatia L.

Chemosphere 2019 Nov 14;234:589-595. Epub 2019 Jun 14.

Department of Zoology and Animal Ecology, Poland.

This study was a follow-up of a previous study that investigated a set of selected fatty acids (FAs; 12 of 56 pools) in Helix pomatia L. as biomarkers of chemical stress induced by applying micro-doses of molluscicides. Here, the potential of rarely used peroxidation (PI) and unsaturation (UI) coefficients were tested as biomarkers. These indices were calculated based on the FA profiles of foot and hepatopancreas tissues of H. pomatia L. Snails were treated with three molluscicides: metaldehyde, methiocarb, and potassium chloride, in three doses each (5, 10, or 15 μl, 0.01% w/v concentration), for 12 weeks, under laboratory conditions. Correlations were evaluated between frequently used oxidation status indicators (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, selenium-dependent peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione transferase, glutathione reductase, glutathione, carbonyl protein, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, in the form of MDA) and UI and PI ratios. These results confirmed that fatty acids could be directly used as biomarkers of exposure and oxidative physiological status in snails. Moreover, the UI and PI, calculated based on FAs, clearly reflected the current oxidation status in snails. These indices changed with the application of micro-doses of molluscicides. In conclusion, these indices could serve as sensitive biomarkers of chemical stress in snails.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.06.026DOI Listing
November 2019

Water mites (Acari, Hydrachnidia) of riparian springs in a small lowland river valley: what are the key factors for species distribution?

PeerJ 2018 24;6:e4797. Epub 2018 May 24.

Department of Biology, University of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro.

This paper examines the impact of disturbance factors-flooding and intermittency-on the distribution of water mites in the riparian springs situated in the valley of a small lowland river, the Krąpiel. The landscape factors and physicochemical parameters of the water were analysed in order to gain an understanding of the pattern of water mite assemblages in the riparian springs. Three limnological types of springs were examined (helocrenes, limnocrenes and rheocrenes) along the whole course of the river and a total of 35 water mite species were found. Our study shows that flooding influences spring assemblages, causing a decrease in crenobiontic water mites in flooded springs. The impact of intermittency resulted in a high percentage of species typical of temporary water bodies. Surprisingly, the study revealed the positive impact of the anthropogenic transformation of the river valley: preventing the riparian springs from flooding enhances the diversity of crenobiontic species in non-flooded springs. In the conclusion, our study revealed that further conservation strategies for the protection of the riparian springs along large rivers would take into account ongoing climatic changes and possible the positive impact of the anthropogenic transformation of river valleys.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.4797DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5971099PMC
May 2018
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