Publications by authors named "Robert E Reisman"

6 Publications

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Stinging insect hypersensitivity: a practice parameter update 2011.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2011 Apr;127(4):852-4.e1-23

Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, 50 N Brockway St, #3-3, Palatine, IL 60067, USA.

These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The AAAAI and the ACAAI have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing "Stinging insect hypersensitivity: a practice parameter update II." Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or the ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion. The Joint Task Force understands that the cost of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents is an important concern that may appropriately influence the work-up and treatment chosen for a given patient. The Joint Task Force recognizes that the emphasis of our primary recommendations regarding a medication may vary, for example, depending on third party payer issues and product patent expiration dates. However, since a given test or agent's cost is so widely variable, and there is a paucity of pharmacoeconomic data, the Joint Task Force generally does not consider cost when formulating Practice Parameter recommendations. In extraordinary circumstances, when the cost benefit of an intervention is prohibitive as supported by pharmacoeconomic data, commentary may be provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2011.01.025DOI Listing
April 2011

Unusual reactions to insect stings.

Authors:
Robert E Reisman

Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2005 Aug;5(4):355-8

School of Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.

Purpose Of Review: A variety of unusual or unexpected reactions have occurred in a temporal relationship to insect stings. This review will summarize these case history reports in recent years. As these reactions are very infrequent, the review will also include prior reported unusual reactions attributed to insect stings.

Recent Findings: Acute encephalopathy occurred 8 days after yellow jacket stings, without any other obvious cause. There have been prior reports of other neurological reactions, myasthenia gravis, peripheral neuritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome related to insect stings. Acute renal failure with tubular necrosis has occurred following massive numbers of stings from Africanized honeybees. Nephrotic syndrome has been reported in the past following single stings. Silent myocardial infarction has occurred, probably related to acute anaphylactic symptoms immediately following a sting. There are recent reports of other pathology, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and rhabdomyolysis and prior reports of thrombocytopenic purpura and vasculitis. As the result of ocular stings, local reactions have occurred with corneal pathology leading to cataracts. Other prior reported reactions to ocular stings include conjunctivitis, corneal infiltration, lens subluxation, and optic neuropathy. There is scarce information regarding the pathogenesis of the majority of the unusual reactions and the subsequent allergic status or risk for sting anaphylaxis of people who have had these unusual reactions.

Summary: This review includes a variety of reactions, particularly involving neurological, renal and cardiovascular symptoms, related to insect stings. It is important that clinicians be aware of this relationship when assessing people with these reactions and address future prophylaxis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.all.0000173782.35283.b6DOI Listing
August 2005

Allergy common problems.

Authors:
Robert E Reisman

Postgrad Med 1976 Apr;59(4):115

a Clinical associate professor of medicine and of pediatrics State University of New York at Buffalo.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00325481.1976.11714328DOI Listing
April 1976