Publications by authors named "Robert Barthen"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Leaching of rare earth elements and base metals from spent NiMH batteries using gluconate and its potential bio-oxidation products.

J Hazard Mater 2021 07 2;414:125564. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Tampere University, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, P.O. Box 541, FI-33104 Tampere, Finland.

Gluconate is known to mediate metal leaching. However, during bioleaching by e.g., Gluconobacter oxydans, gluconate can be oxidized to 2-ketogluconate and 5-ketogluconate. The impact of bio-oxidation of gluconate on metal leaching has not been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate leaching of rare earth elements (REEs) and base metals from spent nickel-metal-hydride (NiMH) batteries using gluconate, 2-ketogluconate and 5-ketogluconate. Batch leaching assays were conducted under controlled and uncontrolled pH conditions for 14 days using 60 mM of either the individual leaching agents or their various combinations. At target pH of 6.0 ± 0.1 and 9.0 ± 0.1 and without pH control, complexolysis was the dominating leaching mechanism and higher REE leaching efficiency was obtained with gluconate, while 5-ketogluconate enabled more efficient base metal leaching. At target pH of 3.0 ± 0.1, acidolysis dominated, and the base metal and REE leaching yields with all the tested leaching agents were higher than under the other studied pH conditions. The highest base metal and REE leaching yields (%) were obtained using gluconate at target pH of 3.0 ± 0.1 being 100.0 Mn, 90.3 Fe, 89.5 Co, 58.5 Ni, 24.0 Cu, 29.3 Zn and 56.1 total REEs. The obtained results are useful in optimization of heterotrophic bioleaching.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2021.125564DOI Listing
July 2021

Recovery of gallium from wafer fabrication industry wastewaters by Desferrioxamine B and E using reversed-phase chromatography approach.

Water Res 2019 Jul 10;158:203-212. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328, Dresden, Germany.

Gallium (Ga) is a critical element in developing renewable energy generation and energy efficient systems. The supply of Ga is at risk and needed recycling technologies for its availability in future. This study demonstrated the recovery of Ga from low gallium concentrated wafer fabrication industry wastewaters using the siderophores desferrioxamine B (DFOB) and desferrioxamine E (DFOE). The complexation of Ga by DFOB and DFOE was through hydroxamate group as demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and density functional theory calculations. The high selectivity of DFOB/E towards Ga was observed due to the formation of highly stable complex. Indeed, due to the formation of such high stability complex, the DFOB and DFOE were able to successfully complex 100% Ga in the two different process water from wafer fabrication industry. For the recovery of the siderophores, a high rate of decomplexation of Ga (>90%) was achieved upon addition of 6 times excess of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) at pH of 3.5. More than 95% of Ga-DFOB and Ga-DFOE complex were recovered with purity (% of Ga moles in comparison to total moles of metals) of 69.8 and 92.9%, respectively by application of a C18 reversed-phase chromatography column. This study, for the first time, demonstrated a technical solution to the recovery of Ga from the low concentrated wastewater based on siderophores and reversed-phase chromatography. A German patent application had been filed for this technology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2019.04.005DOI Listing
July 2019

Screening and selection of technologically applicable microorganisms for recovery of rare earth elements from fluorescent powder.

Waste Manag 2018 Sep 20;79:554-563. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Chemnitzer Str. 40, 09599 Freiberg, Germany. Electronic address:

Rare Earth Elements (REE) are essential elements in many new technology products. Up to now, recycling is poorly established and no environmentally friendly strategies are applied. Modern biotechnologies like bioleaching can contribute to overcome the current limitations. In this study, we investigated bioleaching approaches exemplary for fluorescent phosphor (FP), which is accumulated during the recycling of fluorescent tubes and energy saving bulbs. A broad spectrum of different microorganisms were tested regarding their potential to leach REE from FP. Among them were classical acidophilic microorganisms, as well as various heterotrophic ones, producing organic acids or metal complexing metabolites, or having a high metal tolerance. Larger amounts of REE were leached with the strains Komagataeibacter xylinus, Lactobacillus casei, and Yarrowia lipolytica. Besides the COOH-functionality, also other biotic processes contribute to metal leaching, as comparison with indirect leaching approaches showed. Among the different REE components of the FP preferably the oxidic red dye yttrium europium oxide (YOE) that contain the critical REE yttrium and europium was leached. The results provide the basis for the development of an environmentally friendly recycling process for REE from waste materials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2018.08.030DOI Listing
September 2018

Uranium(VI) Complexes with a Calix[4]arene-Based 8-Hydroxyquinoline Ligand: Thermodynamic and Structural Characterization Based on Calorimetry, Spectroscopy, and Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

ChemistryOpen 2018 Jun 19;7(6):467-474. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf Institute of Resource Ecology Bautzner Landstraße 400 01328 Dresden Germany).

The environmental aspects of ore processing and waste treatment call for an optimization of applied technologies. There, understanding of the structure and complexation mechanism on a molecular scale is indispensable. Here, the complexation of U with a calix[4]arene-based 8-hydroxyquinoline ligand was investigated by applying a wide range of complementary methods. In solution, the formation of two complex species was proven with stability constants of log =5.94±0.02 and log =6.33±0.01, respectively. The formation of the 1:1 complex was found to be enthalpy driven [Δ=(-71.5±10.0) kJ mol; Δ=(-37.57±10.0) kJ mol], whereas the second complexation step was found to be endothermic and entropy driven [Δ=(32.8±4.0) kJ mol; Δ=(68.97±4.0) kJ mol]. Moreover, the molecular structure of [UO(HL)(NO)](NO) () was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Concluding, radiotoxic U was separated from a Eu-containing solution by the calix[4]arene-based ligand in solvent extractions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/open.201800085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6010010PMC
June 2018

Effect of glutamic acid on copper sorption onto kaolinite - Batch experiments and surface complexation modeling.

Chemosphere 2017 Jul 21;178:277-281. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address:

High carbonate content of the European Kupferschiefer ore deposits is a challenge for acid copper leaching (pH ≤ 2). Therefore investigating the mobility behavior of Cu(II) under conditions related to an alternative, neutrophil biohydrometallurgical Cu(II) leaching approach is of interest. As glutamic acid (Glu) might be present as a component in the growth media, we studied its effects on the adsorption of Cu(II) onto kaolinite. The binary and ternary batch sorption measurements of Cu(II) and Glu onto kaolinite were performed in the presence of 10 mM NaClO as background electrolyte and at a pH range from 4 to 9. Sorption experiments were modeled by the charge-distribution multi-site ion complexation (CD-MUSIC) model by using single sorption site (≡SOH) and monodentate surface complexation reactions. Glu sorption on kaolinite is weak (<10%) and independent of pH. Furthermore, Glu slightly enhances the Cu(II) sorption at low pH but strongly hinders (up to 50%) the sorption at higher pH and therewith enhances copper mobility. The results of isotherms show that Cu(II)-Glu sorption onto kaolinite mimics the Freundlich model. The proposed CD-MUSIC model provides a close fit to the experimental data and predicts the sorption of Cu(II), Cu(II)-Glu and Glu onto kaolinite as well as the effect of Glu on Cu(II) mobility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.03.073DOI Listing
July 2017

Manipulation of pyrite colonization and leaching by iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2015 Feb 9;99(3):1435-49. Epub 2014 Nov 9.

Fakultät für Chemie, Biofilm Centre, Aquatische Biotechnologie, Universität Duisburg-Essen Universitätsstr 5, 45141, Essen, Germany,

In this study, the process of pyrite colonization and leaching by three iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species was investigated by fluorescence microscopy, bacterial attachment, and leaching assays. Within the first 4-5 days, only the biofilm subpopulation was responsible for pyrite dissolution. Pyrite-grown cells, in contrast to iron-grown cells, were able to oxidize iron(II) ions or pyrite after 24 h iron starvation and incubation with 1 mM H₂O₂, indicating that these cells were adapted to the presence of enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are generated on metal sulfide surfaces. Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans SS3 and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans R1 showed enhanced pyrite colonization and biofilm formation compared to A. ferrooxidans (T). A broad range of factors influencing the biofilm formation on pyrite were also identified, some of them were strain-specific. Cultivation at non-optimum growth temperatures or increased ionic strength led to a decreased colonization of pyrite. The presence of iron(III) ions increased pyrite colonization, especially when pyrite-grown cells were used, while the addition of 20 mM copper(II) ions resulted in reduced biofilm formation on pyrite. This observation correlated with a different extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition of copper-exposed cells. Interestingly, the addition of 1 mM sodium glucuronate in combination with iron(III) ions led to a 5-fold and 7-fold increased cell attachment after 1 and 8 days of incubation, respectively, in A. ferrooxidans (T). In addition, sodium glucuronate addition enhanced pyrite dissolution by 25%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-014-6180-yDOI Listing
February 2015