Publications by authors named "Rikke Veggerby Grønlund"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Characterization of local gut microbiome and intestinal transcriptome responses to rosiglitazone treatment in diabetic db/db mice.

Biomed Pharmacother 2021 Jan 7;133:110966. Epub 2020 Nov 7.

Gubra, Hørsholm, Denmark.

The gut microbiota has been implicated in the therapeutic effects of antidiabetics. It is unclear if antidiabetics directly influences gut microbiome-host interaction. Oral peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonists, such as rosiglitazone, are potent insulin sensitizers used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). PPAR-γ is abundantly expressed in the intestine, making it possible that PPAR-γ agonists directly influences gut microbiome-host homeostasis. The presented study therefore aimed to characterize local gut microbiome and intestinal transcriptome responses in diabetic db/db mice following rosiglitazone treatment. Diabetic B6.BKS(D)-Lepr/J (db/db) mice (8 weeks of age) received oral dosing once daily with vehicle (n = 12) or rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg, n = 12) for 8 weeks. Gut segments (duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum, and colon) were sampled for paired analysis of gut microbiota and host transcriptome signatures using full-length bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing and RNA sequencing (n = 5-6 per group). Treatment with rosiglitazone improved glucose homeostasis without influencing local gut microbiome composition in db/db mice. In contrast, rosiglitazone promoted marked changes in ileal and colonic gene expression signatures associated with peroxisomal and mitochondrial lipid metabolism, carbohydrate utilization and immune regulation. In conclusion, rosiglitazone treatment markedly affected transcriptional markers of intestinal lipid metabolism and immune regulation but had no effect on the gut microbiome in diabetic db/db mice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2020.110966DOI Listing
January 2021

A Novel Mutation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene Causing Familial Hypocalciuric Hypercalcemia Complicates Medical Followup after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass: A Case Report and a Summary of Mutations Found in the Same Hospital Laboratory.

Case Rep Endocrinol 2019 13;2019:9468252. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre, Denmark.

Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) gene are known to cause familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH), usually a benign form of hypercalcemia without symptoms of a disrupted calcium homeostasis. FHH can be mistaken for the more common primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), for which surgical treatment may be needed. We describe a case of a 36-year-old woman with hypercalcemia and elevated PTH, initially suspected of having PHPT. Sequencing of the CaSR-gene revealed a mutation in nucleotide 437, changing the amino acid in position 146 from Glycine to Aspartate. The mutation was previously undescribed in the literature, but a very low calcium:creatinine clearance ratio supported the diagnosis FHH. A few years later, the patient's two daughters were tested and the association between mutation and hypercalcemia could be confirmed. The patient was gastric bypass-operated and therefore, due to malabsorption and increased risk of fracture, was in need of adequate calcium supplementation. The chronically elevated calcium levels challenged medical followup, as calcium sufficiency could not be monitored in a traditional manner. Eventually the patient developed elevated alkaline phosphatase, a further increased PTH and a decreased DXA T-score indicating calcium deficiency and bone resorption. As a supplement, all CaSR-mutations found at our hospital, 2005-2018.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/9468252DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6393866PMC
February 2019

Leiden Open Variation Database of the MUTYH gene.

Hum Mutat 2010 Nov;31(11):1205-15

Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

The MUTYH gene encodes a DNA glycosylase involved in base excision repair (BER). Biallelic pathogenic MUTYH variants have been associated with colorectal polyposis and cancer. The pathogenicity of a few variants is beyond doubt, including c.536A4G/p.Tyr179Cys and c.1187G4A/p.Gly396Asp (previously c.494A4G/p.Tyr165Cys and c.1145G4A/p.Gly382Asp).However, for a substantial fraction of the detected variants, the clinical significance remains uncertain,compromising molecular diagnostics and thereby genetic counseling. We have established an interactive MUTYH gene sequence variant database (www.lovd.nl/MUTYH) with the aim of collecting and sharing MUTYH genotype and phenotype data worldwide. To support standard variant description, we chose NM_001128425.1 as the reference sequence. The database includes records with variants per individual, linked to available phenotype and geographic origin data as well as records with in vitro functional and in silico test data. As of April 2010, the database contains 1968 published and 423 unpublished submitted entries, and 230 and 61 unique variants,respectively. This open-access repository allows all involved to quickly share all variants encountered and communicate potential consequences, which will be especially useful to classify variants of uncertain significance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.21343DOI Listing
November 2010