Publications by authors named "Rika E Aleliunas"

5 Publications

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Exercise during pregnancy mitigates the adverse effects of maternal obesity on adult male offspring vascular function and alters one-carbon metabolism.

Physiol Rep 2020 09;8(18):e14582

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The University of British Columbia, and BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Maternal obesity during pregnancy can adversely affect adult offspring vascular endothelial function. This study examined whether maternal exercise during pregnancy and lactation mitigates the adverse effects of maternal obesity on offspring vascular endothelial function. Female (C57BL/6N) mice were fed from weaning a control diet (10% kcal fat) or western diet (45% kcal fat) to induce excess adiposity (maternal obesity). After 13 weeks, the female mice were bred and maintained on the diets, with and without access to a running wheel (exercise), throughout breeding, pregnancy, and lactation. Offspring were weaned onto the control or western diet and fed for 13 weeks; male offspring were studied. Maternal exercise prevented the adverse effects of maternal obesity on offspring vascular endothelial function. However, this was dependent on offspring diet and the positive effect of maternal exercise was only observed in offspring fed the western diet. This was accompanied by alterations in aorta and liver one-carbon metabolism, suggesting a role for these pathways in the improved endothelial function observed in the offspring. Obesity and exercise had no effect on endothelial function in the dams but did affect aorta and liver one-carbon metabolism, suggesting the phenotype observed in the offspring may be due to obesity and exercise-induced changes in one-carbon metabolism in the dams. Our findings demonstrate that maternal exercise prevented vascular dysfunction in male offspring from obese dams and is associated with alterations in one-carbon metabolism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14814/phy2.14582DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7518297PMC
September 2020

Maternal folic acid supplementation with vitamin B deficiency during pregnancy and lactation affects the metabolic health of adult female offspring but is dependent on offspring diet.

FASEB J 2018 09 17;32(9):5039-5050. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Epidemiologic studies have reported relationships between maternal high folate and/or low B status during pregnancy and greater adiposity and insulin resistance in children. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of maternal folic acid supplementation (10 mg/kg diet), with (50 μg/kg diet) and without B, on adult female offspring adiposity and glucose homeostasis. Female C57BL/6J mice were fed 1 of 3 diets from weaning and throughout breeding, pregnancy, and lactation: control (2 mg/kg diet folic acid, 50 μg/kg diet B), supplemental folic acid with no B (SFA-B), or supplemental folic acid with adequate B (SFA+B). Female offspring were weaned onto the control diet or a Western diet (45% energy fat, 2 mg/kg diet folic acid, 50 μg/kg diet B) for 35 wk. After weaning, control diet-fed offspring with SFA-B dams had fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, lower β cell mass, and greater islet hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox α and nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group H member 3 mRNA than did offspring from control dams. In Western diet-fed offspring, those with SFA-B dams had lower fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations, and were smaller than control offspring. Our findings suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation with B deficiency during pregnancy/lactation programs the metabolic health of adult female offspring but is dependent on offspring diet.-Henderson, A. M., Tai, D. C., Aleliunas, R. E., Aljaadi, A. M., Glier, M. B., Xu, E. E., Miller, J. W., Verchere, C. B., Green, T. J., Devlin, A. M. Maternal folic acid supplementation with vitamin B deficiency during pregnancy and lactation affects the metabolic health of adult female offspring but is dependent on offspring diet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.201701503RRDOI Listing
September 2018

l-5-Methyltetrahydrofolate Supplementation Increases Blood Folate Concentrations to a Greater Extent than Folic Acid Supplementation in Malaysian Women.

J Nutr 2018 06;148(6):885-890

Departments of Pediatrics, Food, Nutrition & Health, and Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, Canada.

Background: Folic acid fortification of grains is mandated in many countries to prevent neural tube defects. Concerns regarding excessive intakes of folic acid have been raised. A synthetic analog of the circulating form of folate, l-5-methyltetrahydrofolate (l-5-MTHF), may be a potential alternative.

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of folic acid or l-5-MTHF supplementation on blood folate concentrations, methyl nutrient metabolites, and DNA methylation in women living in Malaysia, where there is no mandatory fortification policy.

Methods: In a 12-wk, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention trial, healthy Malaysian women (n = 142, aged 20-45 y) were randomly assigned to receive 1 of the following supplements daily: 1 mg (2.27 μmol) folic acid, 1.13 mg (2.27 μmol) l-5-MTHF, or a placebo. The primary outcomes were plasma and RBC folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations. Secondary outcomes included plasma total homocysteine, total cysteine, methionine, betaine, and choline concentrations and monocyte long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) methylation.

Results: The folic acid and l-5-MTHF groups had higher (P < 0.001) RBC folate (mean ± SD: 1498 ± 580 and 1951 ± 496 nmol/L, respectively) and plasma folate [median (25th, 75th percentiles): 40.1 nmol/L (24.9, 52.7 nmol/L) and 52.0 nmol/L (42.7, 73.1 nmol/L), respectively] concentrations compared with RBC folate (958 ± 345 nmol/L) and plasma folate [12.6 nmol/L (8.80, 17.0 nmol/L)] concentrations in the placebo group at 12 wk. The l-5-MTHF group had higher RBC folate (1951 ± 496 nmol/L; P = 0.003) and plasma folate [52.0 nmol/L (42.7, 73.1 nmol/L); P = 0.023] at 12 wk than did the folic acid group [RBC folate, 1498 ± 580 nmol/L; plasma folate, 40.1 nmol/L (24.9, 52.7 nmol/L)]. The folic acid and l-5-MTHF groups had 17% and 15%, respectively, lower (P < 0.001) plasma total homocysteine concentrations than did the placebo group at 12 wk; there were no differences between the folic acid and l-5-MTHF groups. No differences in plasma vitamin B-12, total cysteine, methionine, betaine, and choline and monocyte LINE-1 methylation were observed.

Conclusion: These findings suggest differential effects of l-5-MTHF compared with folic acid supplementation on blood folate concentrations but no differences on plasma total homocysteine lowering in Malaysian women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01584050.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxy057DOI Listing
June 2018

Folic Acid Supplementation of Female Mice, with or without Vitamin B-12, before and during Pregnancy and Lactation Programs Adiposity and Vascular Health in Adult Male Offspring.

J Nutr 2015 Apr;146(4):688-696

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Child and Family Research Institute, Vancouver, Canada.

Background: The developmental origins of health and disease theory suggest that disturbances in the fetal and early postnatal environment contribute to chronic adulthood diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Greater adiposity and insulin resistance have been reported in children of women with high erythrocyte folate but poor vitamin B-12 status during pregnancy. The mechanisms underlying this relation are not known.

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal supplemental folic acid, with or without vitamin B-12, on adiposity, glucose homeostasis, and vascular health in adult male offspring mice.

Methods: Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet (M-CON, 2 mg folic acid/kg, 50 μg vitamin B-12/kg) or a folic acid-supplemented diet with [10 mg folic acid/kg, 50 μg vitamin B-12/kg (SFA+B12)] or without [10 mg folic acid/kg, no vitamin B-12 (SFA-B12)] vitamin B-12 for 6 wk before mating and during pregnancy and lactation. The offspring were weaned onto a control diet (16% energy from fat) or a western diet (45% energy from fat) until 23 wk of age. The effects of maternal diet on adiposity, vascular function, and glucose tolerance were assessed in 6 groups of adult male offspring: control diet-fed M-CON, SFA+B12, and SFA-B12 and western diet-fed M-CON, SFA+B12, and SFA-B12.

Results: Control and western diet-fed SFA-B12 and SFA+B12 offspring had smaller visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue than M-CON offspring (P < 0.05). Control SFA-B12 and SFA+B12 offspring had lower serum total adiponectin and vitamin B-12 concentrations and lower NADPH oxidase 2 expression in aorta compared with M-CON offspring (P < 0.05). These effects were not observed in western diet-fed offspring.

Conclusions: Folic acid supplementation of female mice before and during pregnancy and lactation, with or without dietary vitamin B-12, affects adult male offspring adiposity, vascular function, and one-carbon metabolism in those fed a control diet but not a western diet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/jn.115.227629DOI Listing
April 2015

Tissue-specific relationship of S-adenosylhomocysteine with allele-specific H19/Igf2 methylation and imprinting in mice with hyperhomocysteinemia.

Epigenetics 2013 Jan 5;8(1):44-53. Epub 2012 Dec 5.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Child & Family Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

DNA methylation is linked to homocysteine metabolism through the generation of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) and S-Adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy). The ratio of AdoMet/AdoHcy is often considered an indicator of tissue methylation capacity. The goal of this study is to determine the relationship of tissue AdoMet and AdoHcy concentrations to allele-specific methylation and expression of genomically imprinted H19/Igf2. Expression of H19/Igf2 is regulated by a differentially methylated domain (DMD), with H19 paternally imprinted and Igf2 maternally imprinted. F1 hybrid C57BL/6J x Castaneous/EiJ (Cast) mice with (+/-), and without (+/+), heterozygous disruption of cystathionine-β-synthase (Cbs) were fed a control diet or a diet (called HH) to induce hyperhomocysteinemia and changes in tissue AdoMet and AdoHcy. F1 Cast x Cbs+/- mice fed the HH diet had significantly higher plasma total homocysteine concentrations, higher liver AdoHcy, and lower AdoMet/AdoHcy ratios and this was accompanied by lower liver maternal H19 DMD allele methylation, lower liver Igf2 mRNA levels, and loss of Igf2 maternal imprinting. In contrast, we found no significant differences in AdoMet and AdoHcy in brain between the diet groups but F1 Cast x Cbs+/- mice fed the HH diet had higher maternal H19 DMD methylation and lower H19 mRNA levels in brain. A significant negative relationship between AdoHcy and maternal H19 DMD allele methylation was found in liver but not in brain. These findings suggest the relationship of AdoMet and AdoHcy to gene-specific DNA methylation is tissue-specific and that changes in DNA methylation can occur without changes in AdoMet and AdoHcy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/epi.23063DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3549880PMC
January 2013
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