Publications by authors named "Richard S Sieller"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Does BioGlue contribute to anastomotic pseudoaneurysm after thoracic aortic surgery?

J Thorac Dis 2017 Aug;9(8):2491-2497

Aortic Institute at Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Background: Although bovine serum albumin-glutaraldehyde glue (BioGlue®) has been successfully used as a hemostatic adjunct in aortic surgical procedures, there are reports that it may lead to anastomotic pseudoaneurysm formation. We seek to examine if the use of BioGlue is associated with a high incidence of anastomotic pseudoaneurysm formation following surgical repair of thoracic aortic disease.

Methods: We reviewed the medical records and follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of patients from 2001 to 2015 in whom BioGlue was used during surgical repair of thoracic aortic disease to detect postoperative anastomotic pseudoaneurysm formation.

Results: A total of 233 patients with BioGlue use were identified. Mean age was 63.5±14.0 years (median 66; range 14-88; 25-75%, IQR 54-74 years) and 149 were male (63.9%). Surgical indication was thoracic aortic aneurysm in 169 (72.5%) patients, aortic dissection in 49 (21.0%), intramural hematoma in 9 (3.9%), penetrating aortic ulcer in 3 (1.3%) and other in 3 (1.3%). Emergency/urgent surgery was performed in 68 cases (29.2%). Operative mortality was 7.3% (17/233). Re-exploration for bleeding and neurologic deficits occurred in 24 (10.3%) and 21 (9.0%) patients respectively. All operative survivors were followed (100%, 216/216) and CT follow-up was available in 81.9% (177/216) for a mean duration of 2.4 years (median 0.6; 25-75% IQR 0.2-3.6 years). Anastomotic pseudoaneurysm was detected in 1 patient (0.6%) at 3 years postoperatively. This was an elderly female with extremely frail tissues who underwent a reoperative ascending and arch replacement for dissection.

Conclusions: The use of BioGlue in thoracic aortic surgery was not associated with excess incidence of anastomotic pseudoaneurysm formation following surgical repair of thoracic aortic disease. Its use need not be discouraged on this basis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jtd.2017.06.120DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5594166PMC
August 2017

Positive family history of aortic dissection dramatically increases dissection risk in family members.

Int J Cardiol 2017 Aug 25;240:132-137. Epub 2017 Apr 25.

Aortic Institute at Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States. Electronic address:

Objectives: Although family members of patients with aortic dissection (AoD) are believed to be at higher risk of AoD, the prognostic value of family history (FH) of aortic dissection (FHAD) in family members of patients with AoD has not been studied rigorously. We seek examine how much a positive FHAD increases the risk of developing new aortic dissection (AoD) among first-degree relatives.

Methods: Patients with AoD at our institution were analyzed for information of FHAD. Positive FHAD referred to that AoD occurred in index patient and one or more first-degree relatives. Negative FHAD was defined as the condition in which only one case of AoD (the index patient) occurred in the family. The age at AoD, exposure years in adulthood before AoD, and annual probability of AoD among first-degree relatives were compared between patients with negative and positive FHADs.

Results: FHAD was positive in 32 and negative in 68 among the 100 AoD patients with detailed family history information. Mean age at dissection was 59.9±14.7years. Compared to negative FHAD, patients with positive FHAD dissected at significantly younger age (54.7±16.8 vs 62.4±13.0years, p=0.013), had more AoD events in first-degree relatives (2.3±0.6 vs 1.0±0.0, p<0.001), and shorter exposure years per AoD event (18.3±6.7 vs 43.1±8.5, p<0.001). Annual probability of AoD per first-degree relative was 2.77 times higher in patients with positive than negative FHADs (0.0100±0.0057 vs 0.0036±0.0014, p<0.001).

Conclusions: A positive FHAD confers a significantly increased risk of developing aortic dissection on family members, with a higher annual probability of aortic dissection, a shorter duration of "exposure time" before dissection occurs and a lower mean age at time of dissection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2017.04.080DOI Listing
August 2017
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