Dr. Richard Odongo Magwanga, PhD - State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology/Institute of Cotton Research - PhD scholar

Dr. Richard Odongo Magwanga

PhD

State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology/Institute of Cotton Research

PhD scholar

Anyang, Henan | China

Main Specialties: Biochemical Genetics, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry

Additional Specialties: Molecular plant breeding

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-1900-5798

Dr. Richard Odongo Magwanga, PhD - State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology/Institute of Cotton Research - PhD scholar

Dr. Richard Odongo Magwanga

PhD
Introduction

Richard is a young dedicated scholar, born and raised in Kenya, in eastern part of the African continent. I hold the following in the realm of the academic spheres, First class honors in Bachelor of Education, chemistry and biology option, masters of science in plants Eco-physiology, and now PhD in plant molecular breeding and genetics.

My passion is to find a lasting solution to drought stress, thus will help in solving myriad of human problems and intern reduce the purge of hunger, currently being experience in almost in global scale.

Primary Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology/Institute of Cotton Research - Anyang, Henan , China

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Dr. Richard Odongo Magwanga’s Resume / CV
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18

Publications

178

Profile Views

47

Reads

11

PubMed Central Citations

Education
Dec 2018
Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Ph.D
Dec 2012
Maseno University
MSc. Botany
Dec 2009
Maseno University
B.Ed science
Mar 2016
Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences Cotton Research Institute
PhD in Molecular Breedinng
Experience
Aug 2018
exploring the role of miRNAs in plants under abiotic stress condition
Lead investigator
Jul 2018
Outstanding International Student Award, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, GSCAAS, Beijing, China
Research and SCI publications
Apr 2018
NACOSTI
Lead investigator
Feb 2012
Teachers service commission
Graduate Teacher 1
Aug 2015
Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University of Science and Technology School of Biological and Physical Sciences
Ass. LECTURER
Top co-authors
Fang Liu
Fang Liu

College of Food Science and Engineering

5
Zhongli Zhou
Zhongli Zhou

Chengdu University of Technology

5
Xiaoyan Cai
Xiaoyan Cai

Northwestern University

5
Pu Lu
4
Latyr Diouf
Latyr Diouf

Graduate School Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (GSCAAS), Beijing

3
Zhenmei Zhang
Zhenmei Zhang

Michigan State University

3
Hejun Lu
Hejun Lu

University of Pittsburgh

3
Zhaoe Pan
Zhaoe Pan

Institute of Cotton Research of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences/State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology

2
Xiongming Du
Xiongming Du

State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology

2

Publications

18Publications

47Reads

11PubMed Central Citations

Whole Genome Analysis of Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK) Gene Family in Cotton and Functional Evaluation of the Role of CDKF4 Gene in Drought and Salt Stress Tolerance in Plants

Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 2625; doi:10.3390/ijms19092625

International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is the number one crop cultivated for fiber production and the cornerstone of the textile industry. Drought and salt stress are the major abiotic stresses, which can have a huge economic impact on cotton production; this has been aggravated with continued climate change, and compounded by pollution. Various survival strategies evolved by plants include the induction of various stress responsive genes, such as cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). In this study, we performed a whole-genome identification and analysis of the CDK gene family in cotton. We identified 31, 12, and 15 CDK genes in G. hirsutum, G. arboreum, and G. raimondii respectively, and they were classified into 6 groups. CDK genes were distributed in 15, 10, and 9 linkage groups of AD, D, and A genomes, respectively. Evolutionary analysis revealed that segmental types of gene duplication were the primary force underlying CDK genes expansion. RNA sequence and RT-qPCR validation revealed that Gh_D12G2017 (CDKF4) was strongly induced by drought and salt stresses. The transient expression of Gh_D12G2017-GFP fusion protein in the protoplast showed that Gh_D12G2017 was localized in the nucleus. The transgenic Arabidopsis lines exhibited higher concentration levels of the antioxidant enzymes measured, including peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) concentrations under drought and salt stress conditions with very low levels of oxidants. Moreover, cell membrane stability (CMS), excised leaf water loss (ELWL), saturated leaf weight (SLW), and chlorophyll content measurements showed that the transgenic Arabidopsis lines were highly tolerant to either of the stress factors compared to their wild types. Moreover, the expression of the stress-related genes was also significantly up-regulated in Gh_D12G2017 (CDKF4) transgenic Arabidopsis plants under drought and salt conditions. We infer that CDKF-4s and CDKG-2s might be the primary regulators of salt and drought responses in cotton

View Article
September 2018

Genome-Wide Analysis of Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion () Family in and and Its Expression Analysis Under Salt, Cadmium, and Drought Stress.

G3 (Bethesda) 2018 07 2;8(7):2483-2500. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Research Base in Anyang Institute of Technology, State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology/Institute of Cotton Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Anyang 455000, Henan, China

View Article
July 2018
4 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
2.51 Impact Factor

Cotton Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA2) Genes Promote Root Growth and Confer Drought Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

doi: https://doi.org/10.1534/g3.118.200423

G3 Genes Genomes Genetics

ABSTRACT Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins play key roles in plant drought tolerance. In this study, 157, 85 and 89 candidate LEA2 proteins were identified in G. hirsutum, G. arboreum and G. raimondii respectively. LEA2 genes were classified into 6 groups, designated as group 1 to 6. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed orthologous gene pairs within the cotton genome. The cotton specific LEA2 motifs identified were E, R and D in addition to Y, K and S motifs. The genes were distributed on all chromosomes. LEA2s were found to be highly enriched in non-polar, aliphatic amino acid residues, with leucine being the highest, 9.1% in proportion. The miRNA, ghr-miR827a/b/c/d and ghr-miR164 targeted many genes are known to be drought stress responsive. Various stress-responsive regulatory elements, ABA-responsive element (ABRE), Drought-responsive Element (DRE/CRT), MYBS and low-temperature-responsive element (LTRE) were detected. Most genes were highly expressed in leaves and roots, being the primary organs greatly affected by water deficit. The expression levels were much higher in G. tomentosum as opposed to G. hirsutum. The tolerant genotype had higher capacity to induce more of LEA2 genes. Over expression of the transformed gene Cot_AD24498 showed that the LEA2 genes are involved in promoting root growth and in turn confers drought stress tolerance. We therefore infer that Cot_AD24498, CotAD_20020, CotAD_21924 and CotAD_59405 could be the candidate genes with profound functions under drought stress in upland cotton among the LEA2 genes. The transformed Arabidopsis plants showed higher tolerance levels to drought stress compared to the wild types. There was significant increase in antioxidants, catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) accumulation, increased root length and significant reduction in oxidants, Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in the leaves of transformed lines under drought stress condition. This study provides comprehensive analysis of LEA2 proteins in cotton thus forms primary foundation for breeders to utilize these genes in developing drought tolerant genotypes.

View Article
July 2018
30 Reads

GBS Mapping and Analysis of Genes Conserved between and Cotton Cultivars that Respond to Drought Stress at the Seedling Stage of the BC₂F₂ Generation.

Int J Mol Sci 2018 May 30;19(6). Epub 2018 May 30.

State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology/Institute of Cotton Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Anyang 455000, China.

View Article
May 2018
4 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
2.86 Impact Factor

QTL MAPPING FOR SALT TOLERANCE IN AN INTRA-SPECIFIC UPLAND COTTON AT SEEDLING STAGE USING SSR MARKERS

J. Plant Breed. Genet. 05 (02) 2017. 57-73

ournal of Plant Breeding and Genetics

Cotton is a moderately salt-tolerant crop, but its salt tolerance threshold is not more than 7.7 ds·m−1. The seedling stage of cotton is the highly sensitive to salinity and the effects can be quantified by measuring morphological and physiological traits. The purpose of this study was to identify QTLs related with salinity tolerance at seedling stage. Meanwhile where they were localized in the genome, investigate the relationships between the traits at seedling stage under salt and to find candidate genes related with salt tolerance. To achieve this goal, two upland cotton accessions mainly cultivated in China; CCRI-35 (Source: 132062) tolerant to salinity as female parent and Nan Dan Ba Di Da Hua: NH (Source: 130549) sensitive to salinity as male parent and their 277 offspring F2:3 population have been used. Our experiment revealed 05 consistent QTLs found in at least two environments. Only 02 major QTLs with high phenotypic variation explained by a single QTL, R2 (%), and high percentage of heritability, HB (%), values were detected on chromosome Chr1 and Chr 7/ Chr16.These QTLs explained phenotypic variation from 5.7 to 60.03 %. Broad sense heritability was high for SL (83.1%) and moderate for GR (68.4). These 02 major QTLs and the 26 genes identified in this study could be used in cotton breeding program and with few obstacles.

View Article
April 2018
3 Reads

A Novel G-Protein-Coupled Receptors Gene from Upland Cotton Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

Genes (Basel) 2018 Apr 12;9(4). Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Research Base in Anyang Institute of Technology, State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology, Institute of Cotton Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science (ICR, CAAS), Anyang 455000, Henan, China.

View Article
April 2018
7 Reads

QTL Mapping of Fiber Quality and Yield-Related Traits in an Intra-Specific Upland Cotton Using Genotype by Sequencing (GBS).

Int J Mol Sci 2018 Feb 1;19(2). Epub 2018 Feb 1.

State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology, Institute of Cotton Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Anyang 455000, China.

View Article
February 2018
7 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)
2.86 Impact Factor

Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Genetic Linkage Map of D Genome Diploid Cotton Derived from an Interspecific Cross between Gossypium davidsonii and Gossypium klotzschianum.

Int J Mol Sci 2018 Jan 11;19(1). Epub 2018 Jan 11.

State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology/Institute of Cotton Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Anyang 455000, China.

View Article
January 2018
9 Reads
2 PubMed Central Citations(source)
2.86 Impact Factor

Characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins family and their role in drought stress tolerance in upland cotton.

BMC Genet 2018 Jan 15;19(1). Epub 2018 Jan 15.

Institute of Cotton Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science (ICR, CAAS)/State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology, Anyang, 455000, China.

View Article
January 2018
8 Reads
4 PubMed Central Citations(source)
2.40 Impact Factor

High-Density Linkage Map Construction and Mapping of Salt-Tolerant QTLs at Seedling Stage in Upland Cotton Using Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS).

Int J Mol Sci 2017 Dec 5;18(12). Epub 2017 Dec 5.

State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology/Institute of Cotton Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Anyang 455000, China.

View Article
December 2017
8 Reads
2 PubMed Central Citations(source)
2.86 Impact Factor

Genome-wide analysis of Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family in diploid cotton, G. raimondii and G. arboreum and its expression analysis under salt, cadmium and drought Stress

DOI: 10.1534/g3.118.200232

G3 Genes Genomes Genetics

The extrusion of toxins and substances at cellular level is a vital survival life process in plants under abiotic stress. The multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) gene family is largely involved in the exportation of toxins and other substrates. We undertook to carry out the genome-wide analysis of MATE gene families in Gossypium raimondii and Gossypium arboreum and assessed their expression levels under salt, cadmium and drought stresses. We identified 70 and 68 MATE genes in G. raimondii and G. arboreum respectively. Majority of the genes were predicted to be localized within the plasma membrane with a few being distributed in other cell parts. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the genes were subdivided into three subfamilies designated as M1, M2 and M3. Closely related members shared similar gene structures, thus were highly conserved in nature and found to have evolved majorly through purifying selection. The genes were distributed in all the chromosomes. Twenty-nine gene duplication events were detected, with segmental type being the dominant. GO annotation revealed the link to salt, drought and cadmium stresses. The genes exhibited differential expression, with GrMATE18, GrMATE34, GaMATE41 and GaMATE51 were significantly up regulated under drought, salt and cadmium stress, and possibly could be the candidate genes. The results of this study provide the very first information on the genome wide and functional characterization of MATE genes in diploid cotton. The results therefore would be important for breeders in the development of more stress tolerant cotton genotypes.

View Article
3 Reads

GBS Mapping and Analysis of Genes Conserved between Gossypium tomentosum and Gossypium hirsutum Cotton Cultivars that Respond to Drought Stress at the Seedling Stage of the BC2F2 Generation

Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 1614; doi:10.3390/ijms19061614

International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Cotton production is on the decline due to ever-changing environmental conditions. Drought and salinity stress contribute to over 30% of total loss in cotton production, the situation has worsened more due to the narrow genetic base of the cultivated upland cotton. The genetic diversity of upland cotton has been eroded over the years due to intense selection and inbreeding. To break the bottleneck, the wild cotton progenitors offer unique traits which can be introgressed into the cultivated cotton, thereby improving their performance. In this research, we developed a BC2F2 population between wild male parent, G. tomentosum as the donor, known for its high tolerance to drought and the elite female parent, G. hirsutum as the recurrent parent, which is high yielding but sensitive to drought stress. The population was genotyped through the genotyping by sequencing (GBS) method, in which 10,888 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) s were generated and used to construct a genetic map. The map spanned 4191.3 cM, with average marker distance of 0.3849 cM. The map size of the two sub genomes had a narrow range, 2149 cM and 2042.3 cM for At and Dt_sub genomes respectively. A total of 66,434 genes were mined, with 32,032 (48.2%) and 34,402 (51.8%) genes being obtained within the At and Dt_sub genomes respectively. Pkinase (PF00069) was found to be the dominant domain, with 1069 genes. Analysis of the main sub family, serine threonine protein kinases through gene ontology (GO), cis element and miRNA targets analysis revealed that most of the genes were involved in various functions aimed at enhancing abiotic stress tolerance. Further analysis of the RNA sequence data and qRT-PCR validation revealed 16 putative genes, which were highly up regulated under drought stress condition, and were found to be targeted by ghr-miR169a and ghr-miR164, previously associated with NAC(NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) and myeloblastosis (MYB), the top rank drought stress tolerance genes. These genes can be exploited further to aid in development of more drought tolerant cotton genotypes. Keywords: cotton; drought; genetic diversity; genotyping by sequencing; backcross

View Article
4 Reads
Top co-authors
Fang Liu
Fang Liu

College of Food Science and Engineering

5
Zhongli Zhou
Zhongli Zhou

Chengdu University of Technology

5
Xiaoyan Cai
Xiaoyan Cai

Northwestern University

5
Pu Lu
4
Latyr Diouf
Latyr Diouf

Graduate School Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (GSCAAS), Beijing

3
Zhenmei Zhang
Zhenmei Zhang

Michigan State University

3
Hejun Lu
Hejun Lu

University of Pittsburgh

3
Zhaoe Pan
Zhaoe Pan

Institute of Cotton Research of Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences/State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology

2
Xiongming Du
Xiongming Du

State Key Laboratory of Cotton Biology

2