Publications by authors named "Ricardo Mohammed-Ali"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Strategic surgical planning during COVID-19 pandemic: A retrospective analysis of maxillofacial surgical activity.

Br J Surg 2020 Oct 31;107(11):e536-e537. Epub 2020 Aug 31.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust-Royal Hallamshire Hospital, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bjs.12012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7929115PMC
October 2020

Lingual nerve injury following use of a supraglottic airway device.

Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2014 Mar 11;52(3):279-80. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Anaesthetics, Rotherham General Hospital, Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

We present the case of a 64-year-old woman who lost sensation on the left side of her tongue after an orthopaedic procedure under general anaesthetic. It provides evidence that anaesthetic airway devices can injure the lingual nerve.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2013.11.004DOI Listing
March 2014

Plate-guided distraction osteogenesis to recreate two-thirds of the mandible including symphysis.

Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2012 Dec 21;50(8):e119-21. Epub 2012 Jun 21.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK.

We report a case of plate-guided distraction osteogenesis to reconstruct a large mandibular defect caused by recurrence of an ameloblastoma in a 17-year-old male patient who had previously had reconstruction using a fibula bone graft.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2011.11.021DOI Listing
December 2012

Use of an innovative tracheostomy mask to prevent external compression of vascular pedicle and excessive humidification of neck wound.

Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2011 Sep 24;49(6):e44-6. Epub 2011 Feb 24.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2011.01.006DOI Listing
September 2011

Osteomyelitis of the mandible secondary to pericoronitis of an impacted third molar.

Dent Update 2010 Mar;37(2):106-8

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Sheffield, UK.

Unlabelled: Impacted third molars are a common reason for referral to the hospital dental service. Third molar impaction can be complicated by infection. We present two cases of osteomyelitis of the mandible developing secondary to pericoronitis of partially erupted lower third molars. One of the cases reported was recently diagnosed and treated while the other was diagnosed and treated 20 years ago. The most commonly reported pathology associated with impacted lower third molars is pericoronitis. Osteomyelitis of the mandible secondary to pericoronitis is rare.

Clinical Relevance: It is helpful if dental practitioners are able to distinguish between the cases of pericoronitis that need emergency referral to hospital and the cases that can be managed in practice and referred to an outpatient clinic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/denu.2010.37.2.106DOI Listing
March 2010

Total mandibular subapical osteotomy: modification of the technique.

Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2009 Dec 6;47(8):629-30. Epub 2009 Mar 6.

Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, East Midlands Rotation, North Trent, Belper, Derbyshire, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2008.11.017DOI Listing
December 2009

Atypical fulminating dental nfections.

Dent Update 2008 Jul-Aug;35(6):420-4

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, RH19 3DZ, UK.

Unlabelled: Dental surgeons are faced with treating dental infections on a daily basis and the cases discussed in this paper highlight the potential outcome of such infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Fulminating infection in the head and neck may present as a rapidly progressive, potentially fatal condition characterized by extensive necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues. One form of such infection is necrotizing fasciitis. Although first described in 1793 by Pouteau, the term necrotizing fasciitis was first coined in 1952 by Wilson who noted that facial necrosis was the most consistent feature of this disease. When necrotizing fasciitis occurs in the head and neck region it is usually odontogenic in origin. This paper reviews the cases of four patients presenting with atypical fulminating dental infection who presented to the oral and maxillofacial department at Guy's and St Thomas's Hospital, London, resulting in cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis. Aggressive management is critical for patient survival and time wasted is tissue lost.

Clinical Relevance: Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of dental infections, especially in patients with altered immune status, is critical. There should be a high index of suspicion in patients with dental infections not responding to treatment and maxillary dental infections with sinus symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/denu.2008.35.6.420DOI Listing
October 2008
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