Publications by authors named "Ricardo Carrillo-Cotto"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of alternatively used thermal treatments on the mechanical and fracture behavior of dental resin composites with varying filler content.

J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 2021 05 25;117:104424. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. Electronic address:

The purpose of this study was two-fold: (i) to investigate whether the thermal treatment of direct dental resin composites (RCs) using microwave or autoclave heating cycles would modify the materials' strength as compared to the protocol without heating (control); and (ii) to compare the mechanical performance of direct and indirect RCs. Three RCs (from 3M ESPE) were tested: one indirect (Sinfony); and two direct materials (microhybrid - Filtek Z250; and nanofilled - Filtek Z350). Specimens from the direct RCs were prepared and randomly allocated into three groups according to the thermal treatment (n = 10): Control - no thermal treatment was performed; Microwave - the wet heating was performed using a microwave oven; and Autoclave - the wet heating was performed in an autoclave oven. The indirect RC was prepared following the instructions of the manufacturer. All materials were tested using flexural strength, elastic modulus, work of fracture (W), microhardness, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey as well as Weibull analysis (α = 0.05). The thermal treatments tended to produce slight changes in the topography of direct RCs, especially by the autoclave' wet heating. Overall, the physico-mechanical properties changed after thermal treatment, although this effect was dependent on the type of RC and on the heating protocol. Sinfony showed the lowest modulus and hardness of the study, although it was the most compliant system (higher work of fracture). The load-deflection ability was also greater for the indirect RC. Reliability of the tested materials was similar among each other (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the alternative thermal treatments suggested here may significantly influence some aspects of the mechanical behavior of dental resin composites, with negative effects relying on both the chemical composition of the restorative material as well as on the wet heating protocol used. Clinicians should be aware of the possible effects that additional wet heating of direct resin composites using microwave or autoclave thermal protocols as performed here could have on the overall fracture and mechanical responses during loading circumstances.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2021.104424DOI Listing
May 2021

Cytotoxicity of contemporary resin-based dental materials in contact with dentin.

Eur J Oral Sci 2020 10 2;128(5):436-443. Epub 2020 Aug 2.

Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.

In this study, the cytotoxicity of different combinations of contemporary resin-based restoratives (adhesives, composites, luting agents) against human keratinocytes (HaCaT) was evaluated under two conditions, whether materials were applied to dentin or not. Adhesives (3-step etch-and-rinse/3ER: OptiBond FL; 2-step self-etch/2SE Clearfil SE Bond; Single Bond Universal/UNI), composites (conventional composite resin/CCR: Filtek Z350XT; flowable/FCR: Filtek Z350XT Flow; self-adhesive composite resin/SACR: Dyad Flow), and luting agents (conventional luting agent/CLA: Variolink-II; self-adhesive luting agent/SLA: RelyXU200) were combined according to their clinical use. Eluates from polymerized specimens applied to dentin were placed in contact with cells grown for 1 and 7 d. The controls were defined by cells without material contact. Cell viability was determined using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide)] assay. C=C conversion was investigated using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. After 1 d of incubation, when dentin was not present, 2SE yielded the highest cell viability, whereas 3ER, UNI, and SACR showed higher cell viability in the presence of dentin. After 7 d, when dentin was absent, 2SE and CLA achieved significantly higher cell viability. The presence of dentin resulted in a drastically higher cell viability for all materials, except 2SE and CLA. UNI had the lowest C=C conversion. The presence of dentin was a significant factor, which resulted in higher cell viability than what was seen for the material specimens per se. All materials resulted in a lower viability of HaCaT than what was seen under the no-material control conditions, with effects mainly limited to the first 24 h.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eos.12723DOI Listing
October 2020